News Releases

Armed Forces Day Parade

Posted May 5, 2021

Saturday, May 15, 2021, 6:00 to 7:00 pm, Crown Creek Boulevard in Centerville, Indiana

Centerville's annual parade to recognize veterans will be held on Armed Forces Day this year, Saturday, May 15. This year's parade will be in reverse. For those not familiar with this Covid concept, the veterans will be stationary, positioned six feet apart along the side of the road. Some will be seated in military vehicles. The parade audience will drive or walk by. The veterans will be in position by 5:45 PM and the audience may pass by from 6 to 7 PM. All veterans and attendees will receive free Ullery's ice cream.

Logo: Centerville Loves Our VeteransThe parade route is Crown Creek Boulevard, the road adjoining Maplewood Park in Centerville. Veterans are asked to enter the parade route from the west end, at Morton Street. The audience is asked to enter from the east end, at Eliason Road.

The parade grand marshall will be Frank Crowe, age 98, Centerville resident, and veteran of the Pacific Theater in WWII. He will be escorted in a WWII jeep owned by Ron Hill.

All area veterans are invited, whether their service was in peace time or conflict. Vietnam-era veterans will be especially recognized as a representative of the Welcome Home Vietnam Veterans organization in Indianapolis will be on hand to give each of them a gift.

To make the event even more special for veterans, the audience is invited to festoon their car, their bike, or themselves with patriotic decorations.

The Centerville veterans parade was first held in 2017, the brainchild of a small committee including Marine Kris Turner and Air Force veteran Dan Wandersee. Adopting the name C-LOV (Centerville Loves Our Veterans), the committee now works under the auspices of Main Street Centerville, Inc. All C-LOV events are for any area veterans, not just Centerville residents.

Sponsors of this year's parade are A&Z Engineering, Indiana Municipal Power Agency, Kenna Consulting, Lochmueller Group, and Warm Glow Candle Company

Cardboard Recycling Program Coming to City of Richmond in Fall 2021

Posted May 3, 2021

The City of Richmond Sanitary District (RSD) has been awarded monies to pilot a curbside cardboard recycling program for residents of the City of Richmond.

Curbside cardboard recycling requires:

  • Distribution of separate specialized (96 gal) recycling container
  • Automated trash truck purchase
  • The development of route(s) to collect cardboard for recycling
  • 2,000 containers available for 2021

Participating residents MUST break down brown corrugated cardboard boxes to no larger than 22" X 22" X 36" to easily slide in/out of containers Please remove all packing materials; Styrofoam to green Rosie Roller; Plastic film/bags to stores that recycle plastic grocery bags (Needlers, Meijer, Kroger, Walmart)

Please complete a few questions so RSD can determine your level of interest of curbside cardboard collection and needs as we plan pick up routes.

The survey is located at: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/NBG72K2

No access to Internet??

Please call Deborah Tevis at 765 983-7456 to sign up!

Supplied Flyer:  Cardboard Recycling - Fall 2021

LifeStream Celebrates Older Americans Month with "Do Something Nice Today" Campaign

Posted May 3, 2021

LifeStream Services invites the community to "Do Something Nice Today" in celebration of Older Americans Month (OAM) during the month of May. The Administration for Community Living set this year's OAM theme as "Communities of Strength" to recognize the important role older adults play in fostering the connection and engagement that build strong, resilient communities.

This last year has been difficult for most Americans, but older Americans have often felt the loneliest as they have spent the year away from friends and family. To foster cheer and a sense of community, LifeStream Services will celebrate OAM by encouraging community members to do something nice for these elder pillars of the community and then share their experiences on LifeStream Services' Facebook and Instagram social media pages. Strength in a community is built and shown not only by bold acts, but also small ones of day-to-day life — sharing a conversation, working in the garden, delivering a meal, or giving a potted plant. And when the community shares these activities with others—even virtually or by telling about the experience later—not only is community strengthened, but it helps seniors build resilience too.

To coincide with Older Americans Month, spring coloring cards will be available for children or adults to color for later delivery to seniors who receive home delivered meals. Cards will be available for pick up during two drive-through events at LifeStream Services' office at 1701 Pilgrim Blvd., Yorktown, IN 47396 on Monday, May 10 from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. and Thursday, May 13 from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. Cards are also available to print on the LifeStream website. Finished cards can be returned by mail or placed in the drop box outside of the office. Deadline for their return is May 20. Learn more about Older Americans Month and what we are doing to celebrate at lifestreaminc.org/older-americans-month.

LifeStream Services also offers several additional community volunteer opportunities to give back to seniors, including the Friendly Caller Program or creating handmade holiday crafts for homebound seniors. The Friendly Caller Program uses contactless communication by telephone to bring together volunteers and isolated older adults to enjoy conversation and ease feelings of loneliness. Contact Laura Bray, Volunteer Services Administrator, at 765-759-3372 or lbray@lifestreaminc.org for more information or to get involved.

Walk-ins Now Welcome at Kuhlman Center Vaccine Clinic

Posted May 3, 2021

Reid Health is now taking walk-ins at the health system's community COVID-19 vaccination clinic at the Wayne County Fairgrounds.

The Kuhlman Center Vaccine Clinic is open 7 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday.

If you would like to schedule an appointment, that still can be done through the state website, ourshot.in.gov, using either the Firefox or Chrome web browser. If you need help getting an appointment, you can register directly with the Kuhlman Center clinic by calling (765) 935-8484 during regular operating hours.

"The Indiana Department of Health has urged health systems giving vaccinations to open up to walk-ins, and we're happy to do so," said Thomas Huth, M.D., Vice President of Medical Affairs for Reid Health. "We want to make it as easy as possible for everyone to get vaccinated."

Free vaccinations also currently are available through appointments at Reid's Urgent Care sites in Richmond (1501 Chester Blvd.) and Connersville (1475 E. State Road 44). The Reid Ready Care Clinic inside the Richmond Meijer store will begin giving shots Monday.

Vaccinations at the Urgent Cares are available from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday-Sunday. The Ready Care Clinic will be open for shots 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday-Friday and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

There is no office fee or copay for vaccination-only visits at any of Reid's locations.

"The Indiana Department of Health has urged health systems giving vaccinations to open up to walk-ins, and we're happy to do so. We want to make it as easy as possible for everyone to get vaccinated." -- Thomas Huth, M.D., Vice President of Medical Affairs

After an appointment has been made, a link will be sent to complete the registration. That information doesn't have to be filled out before arriving for a scheduled vaccination but doing so ahead of time will speed up the process.

Registration is preferred at the Urgent Care and Ready Care sites, but walk-ins are accepted.

Everyone 16 and older is eligible to be vaccinated in Indiana, but only the Pfizer vaccine has been approved by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration for those ages 16-17. Reid's sites use the Pfizer product.

Parents or legal guardians of minor children who will be vaccinated need to be present at the child's appointment.

IU President-elect Pamela Whitten visits IU East

Posted May 3, 2021

IU President-elect Pamela Whitten toured IU East with Chancellor Kathy Girten, student Zachery Honeycutt, and administrators on April 27.
IU President-elect Pamela Whitten toured IU East with Chancellor Kathy Girten, student Zachery Honeycutt, and administrators on April 27.
Supplied Photo:  IU President-elect Pamela Whitten listens as IU East student Zachery Honeycutt shares about the academic programs and resources available in Hayes Hall. Honeycutt is an Admissions Ambassador for the Office of Admissions.
IU President-elect Pamela Whitten listens as IU East student Zachery Honeycutt shares about the academic programs and resources available in Hayes Hall. Honeycutt is an Admissions Ambassador for the Office of Admissions.
Supplied Photo:  IU President-elect Pamela Whitten met with IU East Student Government Association members while she visited campus on Tuesday.
IU President-elect Pamela Whitten met with IU East Student Government Association members while she visited campus on Tuesday.

Indiana University President-elect Pamela Whitten toured the IU East campus on Tuesday, meeting with faculty, staff, local media and community members.

Whitten was named the 19th IU President on April 16 by the IU Board of Trustees. The visit to Richmond is one of five stops at IU Regional campuses this week. Whitten will take the helm on July 1, 2021.

IU East Chancellor Kathy Girten welcomed Whitten to the Richmond campus.

"We are honored to welcome President-elect Whitten to IU East and the community," Girten said. "She is very interested in the campus and all that we have to offer our students and the community. We look forward to working with President-elect Whitten as IU East continues to move toward fall 2021 and beyond."

While at IU East, Whitten was given a tour of the facilities and grounds by Admissions Ambassador Zachery Honeycutt, a senior biochemistry major. Honeycutt - who plans to one day be a dentist - shared his IU East experience with President-elect Whitten and his future plans to attend the IU School of Dentistry.

"IU East really is like a family," he said. "I've really enjoyed my time here."

President-elect Whitten had an opportunity to meet with other students as well, including the Student Government Association.

Andrea Hernández, SGA president, will graduate this May with a degree in human life science and minors in psychology, neuroscience and chemistry. She plans to attend medical school. "I am extremely excited for the impact President-elect Whitten will have on IU as a whole," Hernández said.

Hernández said she appreciated the opportunity to talk with Whitten.

"Talking to her today I noticed she cares a lot about our IU community and has the students' best interests at heart. Since we are a regional campus, I look forward to seeing her involvement with us, keeping us all connected as we are all one IU family regardless of what campus we come from," Hernández said. "I know President-elect Whitten will have a very positive impact on the regional campuses and the IU community. I was honored to have the privilege to meet her today and I cannot wait to see all that is accomplished during her presidential term."

Alex Hakes, SGA vice president, is a junior double-major in political science and Spanish.

"I was so honored to meet President-elect Whitten today. I have a feeling that her expertise and strategy for the IU community will benefit us greatly," Hakes said. "Under Chancellor Girten and President-elect Whitten, the opportunities for growth as a campus will be limitless."

Whitten, a visionary scholar and accomplished educator and researcher, will be the first female president for IU. She will oversee one of the nation's leading research universities at a time of record-level research funding and philanthropic support.She is currently the president of Kennesaw State University.

Whitten holds a Ph.D. in communication studies from the University of Kansas, a Master of Arts in communication from the University of Kentucky and a Bachelor of Science in management from Tulane University. She is an internationally recognized expert in the field of telemedicine. As part of her work in higher education, she additionally held leadership roles at University of Georgia and the University of Kansas Medical Center.

For more information on President-elect Whitten, visit iu.edu/about/leadership/incoming-president/index.html.

Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County Name Deserae Rivas as 2021 Jack Reed Memorial Scholarship Winner

Posted May 3, 2021

Supplied Photo: Deserae Rivas and BGCWC Board Member, Cherie Dolehanty
Deserae Rivas and BGCWC Board Member, Cherie Dolehanty

The Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County named Deserae Rivas as their 2021 Jack Reed Memorial Scholarship winner. Rivas will receive $2,000 to continue her education post high school. Rivas is a senior at Richmond High School and intends to study biomedical engineering in order to pursue a career as a plastic surgeon for cancer patients.

"Once (tumors) are removed they leave tissues and scars, causing a daily reminder of the pain you're enduring," Rivas explained about her desire to become a plastic surgeon. "If I can comprehend and embrace the pain these patients are feeling, I can help make it easier with my techniques in my line of work."

Rivas was selected from a group of three finalists by a panel of judges based on her academic merits and involment with the Club. Rivas has been a Club member for 7 years and has participated in Club programs like Biz Kid$, a financial literacy initative that teaches kids about money and business.

"She has an intrinsic drive to succeed that is rarely see among even the brightest of students," Richmond Community Schools STEM Department Head Brandon Hilbert noted of Rivas in a letter of recommendation. "Her determination, intrinsic motivation, and experiences while a student at Richmond Hight School set her apart from others."

Jack Reed was a Board Member of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County and advocate for youth development. After relocating to northern Indiana, Reed was instrumental in helping to open a new Boys & Girls Club in the Fort Wayne area. His dedication to youth and service to his community was remembered by his family when they created the Jack Reed Memorial Scholarship in his honor.

The mission of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County is "to enable all young people, especially those who need us most, to reach their full potential as productive, caring, and responsible citizens." Members of the Club, ages 6-18, have access to dedicated, trained professionals who provide guidance in adopting healthy lifestyles and pursuing educational objectives. Currently, the Club serves over 3,000 youth at five locations: the Jeffers, McDaniel, Central, First Bank, and Hagerstown units and during the summer at their 168-acre Camp Guy located on the Whitewater River. Since 1957, the Club has been striving to equip young people with the skills they need to succeed in life. For more information, visit www.bgcrichmond.org.

New Federal Relief Grants Available Through Restaurant Revitalization Fund

Posted May 3, 2021

Indiana SBDC and gener8tor to help Hoosier businesses apply for grants

INDIANAPOLIS (April 30, 2021) – The U.S. Small Business Administration is launching the Restaurant Revitalization Fund to provide relief for the restaurant and food service industry, which has been disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. Demand for this funding is high, so the Indiana Economic Development Corporation (IEDC) and the Indiana Small Business Development Center (Indiana SBDC) are encouraging Hoosier businesses to register and apply for funding through this program as soon as possible.

Through the Restaurant Revitalization Fund, eligible businesses may receive awards between $1,000 and $5 million per location to offset expenses, such as payroll, supplies, and operating expenses, incurred between Feb. 15, 2020, and March 11, 2023. Interested businesses may register starting today, Friday, April 30, at 9 a.m. EDT, and the portal to submit applications will open on Monday, May 3, at 12:00 p.m. EDT.

To help Hoosier restaurant and food service owners apply for and access available funds, the Indiana SBDC is partnering with gener8tor to offer no-cost webinars, including two in Spanish. The first webinar is scheduled for today at 3 p.m. EDT. Consultations and application assistance will also be offered through designated virtual office hours beginning next week. In addition, Spanish interpretation services will be offered through the regional Indiana SBDC offices. Specific dates, times and more details are available on the Indiana SBDC website.

"Indiana restaurants and food service owners were quick to respond and pivot during the height of the pandemic," said David Watkins, state director for the Indiana SBDC. "We're grateful for their perseverance and want them to know more federal funding will be available through this new relief program. It is vital for eligible Indiana businesses to apply as soon as possible, as we anticipate these federal funds will be distributed quickly across the nation."

RESTAURANT REVITALIZATION FUND

Grant Details:

  • The SBA may provide funding up to $5 million per location, not to exceed $10 million total for the applicant and any affiliated businesses.
  • The minimum award is $1,000.
  • Eligible expenses include business expenses such as payroll, supplies, and operating expenses, construction of outdoor seating and some business debt.
  • Funds must be spent on expenses that were/are incurred between February 15, 2020 and March 11, 2023.

Eligibility

Eligible entities are businesses that are not permanently closed and include businesses where the public or patrons assemble for the primary purpose of being served food or drink.

This includes:

  • Restaurants
  • Food stands, food trucks, food carts
  • Caterers
  • Bars, saloons, lounges, taverns
  • Snack and nonalcoholic beverage bars (e.g., coffee shops, ice cream shops)
  • Bakeries (onsite sales to the public comprise at least 33% of gross receipts)
  • Brewpubs, tasting rooms, taprooms* (onsite sales to the public comprise at least 33% of gross receipts)
  • Breweries and/or microbreweries* (onsite sales to the public comprise at least 33% of gross receipts)
  • Wineries and distilleries* (onsite sales to the public comprise at least 33% of gross receipts)
  • Inns* (onsite sales of food and beverage to the public comprise at least 33% of gross receipts)
  • Licensed facilities or premises of a beverage alcohol producer where the public may taste, sample, or purchase products
  • Other similar places of business in which the public or patrons assemble for the primary purpose of being served food or drink

Register & Apply

Registration, more details and the application are available at sba.gov/restaurants. Account registration opens today, Friday, April 30, at 9:00 a.m. EDT, and the portal to submit applications will open Monday, May 3, at 12:00 p.m. EDT.

For more information on available recovery and relief resources, programs and grants available to small businesses, including the Indiana Small Business Restart Grant and Indiana Hospitality and Entertainment Grant, please visit isbdc.org/covid-resources.

About Indiana SBDC

The Indiana Small Business Development Center (Indiana SBDC) is a program of the Indiana Economic Development Corporation, which leads the state of Indiana's economic development efforts. The Indiana SBDC helps entrepreneurs launch, grow and locate businesses in the state, providing entrepreneurs with expert guidance and resources on how to start and grow a business. With a network of 10 regional offices through the state, the Indiana SBDC creates a positive and measurable impact on the formation, growth and sustainability of Indiana's small businesses.

The Indiana SBDC is funded, in part, through a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Small Business Administration. All opinions, conclusions, and/or recommendations expressed herein are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the SBA. For more information about the Indiana SBDC, visit www.isbdc.org.

Reid Health's Focus on Perinatal and Infant Loss Support Inspires Donation

Posted May 3, 2021

Supplied Photo: Stephanie Nicholson (left), Reid Health’sIt's been eight months since Claire Olson and her husband, Jared, lost their daughter Piper halfway through Claire's pregnancy.

In the time since, the couple have launched an effort in Piper's name that aims to support other families grieving the loss of a life that had only just begun.

Piper's Purpose, a group made up of Claire and a few volunteers, have been making donations of handmade blankets, candles, and more to hospitals and OB/GYN offices. On Friday, she and Jared dropped off their latest gift at Reid Health.

The donation was a special one for the couple. It was the first time Jared had been able to be there with Claire when the items were presented.

"He's always had to work in the past," Claire said, "but we are trying to represent both the support of the mom and the dad."

The donations, dubbed Piper's Packages, typically consist of a small handmade blanket, candles, pregnancy and infant loss stickers, and information about Return to Zero: H.O.P.E., a non-profit organization focused on raising awareness of pregnancy and infant loss issues.

"I wouldn't be able to connect with the loss community and expand our mission if it weren't for family, friends, and volunteer support," Claire said.

For Reid, the gift was a bit different, consisting of items for siblings such as children's books about death and dying.

"Especially for Reid, we branched out to find ways to support the living siblings," Claire said.

"I really do think Reid has one of the most comprehensive bereavement programs I've come across. I would definitely encourage others to use Reid because they'll be well taken care of from a bereavement standpoint." -- Claire Olson of Piper's Purpose

There's also something for providers, including cards and little items that can be given to the nurses who work with families who have suffered a loss.

"These nurses experience the grief, too," Claire said. "These are little things if they need a pick-me-up."

When Piper's Purpose was just beginning, the first contact Claire made with any hospital was to Stephanie Nicholson, Reid's Resolve Through Sharing Bereavement Coordinator.

"She took my call, which is a big deal, and then we talked forever. She was very supportive of our mission and was very receptive to the idea that the things we were offering could be used and could be a benefit at Reid," Claire said.

"From our first conversation, I was really drawn to what Reid is doing. She just kind of affirmed everything that I had seen on their website that was being implemented."

Claire had been drawn to the section of the Reid Health website that deals with perinatal and infant loss. What she found there suggested Reid was serious about helping families grieve, a trait that was rare in her early experience with Piper's Purpose.

As time passed and Claire worked with other health systems, her belief that Reid's program was special strengthened.

"I really do think Reid has one of the most comprehensive bereavement programs I've come across. I would definitely encourage others to use Reid because they'll be well taken care of from a bereavement standpoint," Claire said.

"It appears there is leadership and overall hospital network support for providing comprehensive bereavement resources to families, which is something I don't always see."

"To have the Reid leadership support and then someone like Stephanie running the program, I think that's a special combination." -- Claire Olson

Claire credits Nicholson for building a program to support families at a time when it's needed most.

"She just has a special personality and ability to relate and be compassionate, and I think that translates into the program," Claire said. "It's her leadership, commitment, and understanding of this type of loss and how to give full support from the beginning to the end. She seems very passionate about continuing to develop the bereavement resources.

"To have the Reid leadership support and then someone like Stephanie running the program, I think that's a special combination."

Although bereavement support has been present at Reid's Family Birthing Center for more than two decades, since 2018, many of the staff there, at the Reid OB/GYN office, and in outpatient surgery have taken courses in being a bereavement support person.

"That's something that's definitely not in every facility," Nicholson said.

Claire agreed.

"To have people actually trained in managing those moments in the hospital with the family is so important. The situation is already very traumatic for the family. That's huge to be able to have training support that's valued," she said.

If you have questions about Reid's Perinatal & Infant Loss Program, please contact Stephanie Nicholson by calling the Family Birthing Center at (765) 983-3020.

For more information about Piper's Purpose, visit their website at piperspurpose.org or their Facebook page.

Pack Expansion: IU East Adds Varsity Esports

Posted May 3, 2021

Supplied Photo:  IU East is adding varsity esports at the start of the 2021 academic year.
IU East is adding varsity esports at the start of the 2021 academic year.

Red Wolf Nation welcomes esports to the Pack.

Indiana University East will add a varsity esports program starting with the 2021-22 school year.

Esports is a video game-based form of competition that has rocketed in popularity in recent years.

"We're excited to be the first IU regional campus to offer varsity esports," said IU East Director of Athletics Joe Griffin. "We know esports is an up-and-coming activity, and we see that it is something our students really want here at IU East."

IU East plans to launch teams competing in five to seven games. League of Legends and Rocket League teams in particular appear to be natural fits for the IU East Varsity Esports Team. The Esports Club at IU East already competes in both games. Other teams will be considered based on student interest and the development of the varsity program.

Work on an IU East esports arena, powered by Alienware, is already underway.

IU East first entered into the esports world when a group of students formed the Esports Club at IU East in 2019. The student club will continue, in the hopes the varsity and club squads will benefit each other in their growth and development. The club will switch gears and rebrand to more of a social/non-competitive environment to provide gaming based gatherings and events on campus.

Andy Britt and Kaly Irvine will serve as coaches for the esports teams. IU East students or prospective students can contact the coaches with an email to RWEsport@iue.edu, or fill out a recruiting form at iueredwolves.com/recruiting.php (click the 'esports' tab).

For more information and updates on Esports at IU East, visit Red Wolves Athletics at iueredwolves.com.

INDOT to Resurface Portions of US 40 in Henry and Wayne Counties

Posted May 3, 2021

The Indiana Department of Transportation will intermittently close lanes on US 40 for a paving job in Eastern Henry and Wayne Counties.

Crews will be working to repave sections of US 40 EB and WB from Dunreith to East Germantown.

One lane in each direction will be open during construction. In town, crews will potentially use flaggers during construction.

Crews will begin working on US 40 starting end of April. Construction is scheduled to be complete by the end of October 2021.

During construction, the public is asked to slow down and be mindful of crews in the area. All work is weather dependent. For the latest information, follow @INDOTEast on Twitter and INDOT East Central on Facebook.

Stay Informed

Motorists in East Central Indiana can monitor road closures, road conditions, and traffic alerts any time via:

COVID-19 Vaccinations Now Available at Reid Urgent Cares in Richmond, Connersville

Posted April 29, 2021

Those looking to be vaccinated for COVID-19 have two new options for scheduling their appointments now that Reid Health's Urgent Care facilities in Richmond and Connersville have begun administering shots.

Free vaccinations at the Richmond (1501 Chester Blvd.) and Connersville (1475 E. State Road 44) sites are available from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday-Sunday. There is no office fee or copay for vaccination-only visits.

"We're pleased to be able to offer vaccinations at these new locations," said Thomas Huth, M.D., Vice President of Medical Affairs at Reid Health. "Our goal is to get as many people as possible vaccinated as quickly as possible."

A separate treatment space has been established in the Urgent Cares to administer the vaccine. Patients will wait out the required 15-minute, post-inoculation observation period in the lobby area, which is socially distanced with each chair cleaned after it's vacated.

Appointments should be scheduled through the state website, ourshot.in.gov, using either the Firefox or Chrome web browser. Look for Reid Health UC Richmond or Reid Health UC Connersville among the list of options.

After an appointment has been made, a link will be sent to complete the registration. That information doesn't have to be filled out before arriving for the scheduled vaccination but doing so ahead of time will speed up the process.

"The longer it takes to get people vaccinated, the higher the likelihood that one of these variants could catch hold or even a new one might pop up that the vaccines are less effective against. We need everyone to do their part and register to be vaccinated. That's how we'll eventually be able to end this pandemic." -- Thomas Huth, M.D., Vice President of Medical Affairs

The Indiana Department of Health has designated 211 as a call line for assistance, but Reid has been made aware at least some local sites aren't showing for 211 staff as having available appointments. Patients should specifically ask for the Richmond or Connersville Urgent Care if 211 staff don't initially offer it as an option.

Everyone 16 and older is eligible to be vaccinated in Indiana, but only the Pfizer vaccine has been approved by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration for those ages 16-17. Reid's Urgent Care sites use the Pfizer product.

Parents or legal guardians of minor children who will be vaccinated need to be present at the child's appointment.

Although the spread of COVID has diminished recently in Reid's service area, variants of the virus circulating around the country, including in Indiana, have health officials worried a new wave of cases could be in our future if vaccination numbers don't rise more quickly.

"The longer it takes to get people vaccinated, the higher the likelihood that one of these variants could catch hold or even a new one might pop up that the vaccines are less effective against," Dr. Huth said.

"We need everyone to do their part and register to be vaccinated. That's how we'll eventually be able to end this pandemic."

Mission, Vision, Values: Reid Health Sets Expectations for 'Kind of Organization We Strive To Be'

Posted April 29, 2021

Nearly 30 years ago, the leaders of Reid Memorial Hospital changed the name of their organization and created a new mission statement, both with the intent to better reflect shifts in healthcare at the time.

During the following three decades, the name would change again but the mission statement remained.

Until now.

Reid Health has set new guides for its future, adopting statements that spell out the mission, vision, and values for the institution that will help govern decision-making over the coming years.

"Our mission and vision statements along with our organizational values are meant to inspire our team members and the communities we serve while also helping guide us in the short and long terms," said Craig Kinyon, Reid Health President/CEO. "These will influence our priorities, activities, and responsibilities for the years ahead.

"We want to clearly state for our team members, our patients, their families, and our communities where our priorities lie, the kind of organization we strive to be, and give a clear roadmap on what is required to improve the health of individuals in our service area."

Since 1992, Reid's mission statement has read:

"Wholeness -- in body, mind, and spirit -- is basic to fulfillment of human potential. Reid Hospital & Health Care Services and its people work with others to enhance wholeness for all those we serve. Our convictions include commitment to compassion, service, excellence, value. These convictions are expressed daily through C.A.R.E. principles, the active demonstration of courtesy, attitude, respect, enthusiasm. These principles are directed toward those people we are privileged to serve and among all of us who serve."

As was the case when that guiding statement was adopted, Reid Health officials now wanted to create something that better reflected the current state of healthcare.

"We want to clearly state for our team members, our patients, their families, and our communities where our priorities lie, the kind of organization we strive to be, and give a clear roadmap on what is required to improve the health of individuals in our service area." -- Craig Kinyon, Reid Health President/CEO

"Reid Health has grown and changed exponentially since the last revision of our mission statement in 1992," said Tom Hilkert, Chairman of the Governing Board. "Because we have evolved from a single hospital into a multi-county, full-service regional healthcare system, our focus has expanded to include an even greater emphasis on the wellness and well-being of each individual we serve."

"While it has stood the test of time, most organizations update their mission statements at least every five years," said Jennifer Ehlers, Reid Health Vice President/Chief Quality Officer. "Healthcare has changed dramatically from focusing only on healing the sick to today's world of preventing illness in the first place."

"We wanted to revisit these core tenants to ensure they properly reflect the organization we are today as well as the one we will continue to aspire to be in the future," Kinyon said.

The new statements are much shorter and focused, reflecting a trend in the healthcare industry.

Our Mission:

To lead our communities to well-being, one person at a time

Our Vision:

Healthier people, thriving communities, trusted partner

Our Values:

Excellence, empathy, integrity, accountability

"These set the standards our team members are accountable to fulfill. They represent the culture we must maintain and give team members a clear understanding of what is important to us as an organization to serve the needs of our patients and our community," Kinyon said.

"For our patients and their families, these represent the level of care they should expect to receive from Reid Health."

The process to create the new statements began more than a year ago in January 2020. Reid's executive team and governing board came together to consider the elements of strong mission and vision statements.

They reviewed the current mission statement and explored industry best practices, eventually developing three drafts that then were whittled down to one mission and vision statement. Those were shared with the entire board, leadership, workforce, medical staff, and key community partners, including Reid's volunteer group, patient advisory groups and external organizations.

"While it has stood the test of time, most organizations update their mission statements at least every five years. Healthcare has changed dramatically from focusing only on healing the sick to today's world of preventing illness in the first place." -- Jennifer Ehlers, Reid Health Vice President/Chief Quality Officer

From there, the focus shifted to identifying Reid's core values. A diverse group of employees was assembled to serve as a focus group to develop a new list.

"Their work later was shared with the executive team, board, and other stakeholders with minor adjustments made to the excellent work completed by the focus group," Ehlers said.

Governing board member Denise Retz was a member of the team that took on the task of establishing the new core values. Part of that effort involved talking through the C.A.R.E. principles from the previous mission statement.

"What has defined Reid Health through the years has been those C.A.R.E. principles. That's ingrained into the Reid Health team and the culture," Retz said. "It was neat to see how different departments look at the values depending on what area of healthcare they work in.

"It all came back to why they're really there, and that was the service they want to provide. It also came down to, 'How do we define what Reid wants in our values going forward?'."

Then-governing board member Aleasia Stewart also was part of the group working on the core values.

"During the process, we heard firsthand from Reid team members what they believe about the organization. There is compassion and a genuine sense of caring for patients and their families by the Reid team," she said.

"During the work sessions, great care was taken to hear participants and focus on common ground. I believe the final product reflects inclusivity and the collective thinking of the group."

"It all came back to why they're really there, and that was the service they want to provide. It also came down to, 'How do we define what Reid wants in our values going forward?'." -- Denise Retz, Reid governing board member

Retz hopes the communities that Reid serves will take notice of the new mission and vision statements and core values. To her, they reflect the kind of organization that Reid wants to be and set standards that meet and exceed patient, family, and visitor expectations.

"I'd like to know what Reid's values are before I walk in the door for care," she said. "To me, aside from being a board member, I would like to know what their mission, vision, and values are before I even think about giving them my business, and as a board member, I want to know those things before I consider sitting on their board. As an employee, you want to know they have the same morals and values as you do before you think of joining the team.

"This is why this process is so valuable. The mission, vision, and values truly come from each person that walks through the door and should reflect in how we make them feel."

Watch a new video about the culture at Reid Health, Within Our Walls.

IU East Celebrates Outstanding Students During Virtual Honors Convocation

Posted April 29, 2021

Indiana University East is celebrating the accomplishments of its students with a virtual Honors Convocation on April 22. The Honors Convocation is an annual event to announce the recipients of Chancellor's Scholar Awards, Outstanding Student Awards, and Honors Program graduates.

The Honors Convocation is available to watch on IU East Facebook Live Premiere at https://www.facebook.com/iueast/videos/2927443414166210.

Additionally, IU East has announced this year's Naomi Osborne Scholar, Hannah Buehner of Connersville, Indiana. The Naomi Osborne Award is an honor given to the graduate with the highest grade point average. Buehner will receive a Bachelor of Arts in Communication Studies and a Bachelor of Arts in Spanish.

Chancellor's Scholar Awards are campus-wide awards, presented to the highest achieving seniors, by academic school.

School of Business and Economics

  • Falen Pope, Indianapolis, Indiana

School of Education

  • Erika Gallaher, New Paris, Ohio

School of Humanities and Social Sciences

  • Michael Richmond, Connersville, Indiana

School of Natural Science and Mathematics

  • Calev Isaacson, Phoenix, Arizona

School of Nursing and Health Sciences

  • Anna Butler, Noblesville, Indiana

School of Social Work

  • Elena Jennings, Liberty, Indiana

Outstanding Student Awards were given to individuals in their degree programs who displayed outstanding academic achievement at IU East. Students receiving awards are the following:

School of Business and Economics

  • Emily Merrell, Brookville, Indiana, Outstanding Student in Accounting
  • Kelly Byrd, Outstanding Student in Business Administration
  • Adrian Calderon, Richmond, Indiana, Outstanding Student in Entrepreneurship
  • Tyler Hochwalt, Scotsdale, Arizona, Outstanding Student in Finance
  • Curtis Robbins, Knightstown, Indiana, Outstanding Student in Information Systems or Informatics
  • Magda Linette, Poznan, Wielkopolskie, Poland, Outstanding Student in Marketing

School of Education

  • Mary Beth McMurry, Connersville, Indiana, Outstanding Student in Elementary Education
  • Tori Harker, Lebanon, Indiana, Outstanding Elementary Education Student Teacher
  • Madison Lakes, Eaton, Ohio, Outstanding Student in Secondary Education
  • Michelle Monnin, Greenville, Ohio, Outstanding Secondary Education Student Teacher
  • Kate Bennett, Indianapolis, Indiana, Outstanding Graduate Student

School of Humanities and Social Sciences

  • Tiani Christian, Richmond, Indiana, Outstanding Student in Communications Studies
  • Risa Griffin, Richmond, Indiana, Outstanding Student in Criminal Justice
  • Kari Mynhier, Wawaka, Indiana, Outstanding Student in English
  • Calen Crumpton, Connersville, Indiana, Outstanding Student in History
  • Austin Haus, Hagerstown, Indiana, Outstanding Student in Humanities
  • Audra deFalco, Flushing, New York, Outstanding Student in Political Science
  • Rachel Washington, Indianapolis, Indiana, Outstanding Student in Psychology
  • Katie Hassan, Bloomington, Indiana, Outstanding Student in Sociology
  • Angely Luna Martinez, San Juan, Puerto Rico, Outstanding Student in Spanish
  • Lauren Murray, Richmond, Indiana, Outstanding Graduate Student in English

School of Natural Science and Mathematics

  • Zachery Honeycutt, Richmond, Indiana, Outstanding Student in Biochemistry
  • Kelsey Clark, Albion, Indiana, Outstanding Student in Biology
  • Kelsea Joseph, Middletown, Ohio, Outstanding Student in General Studies
  • Emma Lewis, Springport, Indiana, Outstanding Student in Human Life Science
  • Elizabeth Barnett, Valley Village, California, Outstanding Student in Mathematics
  • Alyssa Couch, Roanoke, Indiana, Outstanding Student in Natural Science and Mathematics, Bachelors of Arts
  • Nicole Weber, Manteno, Illinois, Outstanding Graduate Student in Biology
  • Zachary Keller, Portland, Indiana, Outstanding Graduate Student in Mathematics

School of Nursing and Health Sciences

  • Madeline Roggy, Bloomington, Indiana, Outstanding Student in Applied Health Sciences
  • Stephanie Fortman, Cambridge City, Indiana, Outstanding Student in Bachelor of Science in Nursing
  • Abby Weitzel, Celina, Ohio, Outstanding Student in RN to B.S.N.
  • Tonya Miller, Richmond, Indiana, Outstanding Student in M.S.N.

School of Social Work

  • Courtney Pillow, Greenfield, Indiana, Outstanding Bachelor of Social Work

IU East Honors Program Graduates

  • Brooke Conway, Richmond, Indiana
  • Shannon Dice, Connersville, Indiana
  • Calev Isaacson, Phoenix, Arizona
  • Julie Kramer, Ansonia, Ohio
  • Julia McCullough, Gordon, Ohio
  • Emily Merrell, Brookville, Indiana
  • Julie Miller, Nashville, Tennessee
  • Brooke Perreira, Greenville, Ohio
  • Falen Pope, Indianapolis, Indiana
  • Ruan Roelofse, Cape Town, South Africa
  • Nicole Visse, Batavia, Ohio
  • Tatyana Whited, Brownsburg, Indiana

Singles Interaction, Inc.

Posted April 26, 2021

Supplied Flyer: Singles Interaction May 2021

If you are 21 years of age or better and single, divorced, widow or widower, Singles' Interaction invites you to join them on Friday nights. Come to the Eagles Lodge, 75 South 12th Street, Richmond (membership not required) and meet other single people in the Richmond area.

Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County to Open New Location in Townsend Memorial Building

Posted April 21, 2021

Supplied Flyer: Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County Open House

The Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County are celebrating the opening of the new First Bank Boys & Girls Club at the Rev. James M. Townsend Memorial Building with a ribbon cutting ceremony by the Wayne County Area Chamber of Commerce and an open house on Thursday, May 27th from 4-6pm. Community members are invited to tour the new facility and sign-up information will be available for families interested in joining the Boys & Girls Clubs.

Garry Kleer, First Bank President and CEO and Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County Board Member, is excited about this opportunity to collaborate with the Clubs, stating, "First Bank is proud of the long-standing partnership that we have had with the Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County. We have been involved in many aspects over the years including support of the Clubs' operations through our legacy sponsorship and our employees volunteering at their seasonal Christmas shop."

The First Bank Boys & Girls Club represents a community-wide effort to bring the Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County and their afterschool programming to a previously unserved area of Richmond. First Bank Richmond, Reid Healthcare, Paul and Pat Lingle Charitable Fund, Urban Enterprise Association, Stamm Koechlein Family Foundation, Economic Growth Group, and the Wayne County Foundation pledged multi-year donations to ensure the Club's success. State-of-the-art technology and high-speed internet access for Club Members were made possible through partnerships with Belden Wire and Cable and Parallax Systems. The Housing Authority of Richmond financed renovations to the Rev. James M. Townsend Memorial Building customized to Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County's unique needs including a new roof, HVAC and electric system updates, program spaces, and a restored gymnasium.

"The Housing Authority of the City of Richmond and the Boys and Girls Clubs of Wayne County have a long-standing working relationship in serving our community," remarked Housing Authority Executive Director and Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County Board Member Derek White. "This latest venture at the Rev. James M. Townsend Memorial Building is the fruit of that partnership, and for that, we are grateful."

"The First Bank Boys & Girls Club at the Rev. James M. Townsend Memorial Building will help further the Clubs' mission of promoting academic success, healthy lifestyles, and good character and citizenship to its members," Kleer reflected. "First Bank's gift fosters our philosophy of 'Doing Great Things Together' within our community."

The mission of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County is "to enable all young people, especially those who need us most, to reach their full potential as productive, caring, and responsible citizens." Members of the Club, ages 6-18, have access to dedicated, trained professionals who provide guidance in adopting healthy lifestyles and pursuing educational objectives. Currently, the Club serves over 3,000 youth at five locations: the Jeffers, McDaniel, Central, First Bank, and Hagerstown units and during the summer at their 168-acre Camp Guy located on the Whitewater River. Since 1957, the Club has been striving to equip young people with the skills they need to succeed in life. For more information, visit www.bgcrichmond.org.

Community Benefit Gives $120,000-Plus to Mental Health and Substance Misuse Programs

Posted April 21, 2021

In the first of two grant cycles this year, Reid Health Community Benefit is giving more than $120,000 to 19 local organizations.

The first cycle of 2021 was focused on Mental Health & Substance Misuse, with $129,342 being awarded to a mix of nonprofits, schools and governmental entities.

Requests were evaluated based on their ability to impact the number of adults who smoke, the death rate due to drug poisoning, mothers who smoke during pregnancy, age-adjusted death rate due to suicide, child abuse rate, non-fatal emergency visits due to opioid overdose, and poor mental health average number of days.

Applications for the second cycle -- Physical Activity, Nutrition, and Weight -- are open until May 20. Those will be evaluated based on their ability to impact access to exercise opportunities, adults age 20 and older who are obese, adults 20 and older who are sedentary, child food insecurity rate, and food insecurity rate.

The awards for the first cycle include:

  • $11,250 to Birth to Five to support the Healthy Families program.
  • $11,250 to Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County for its Prevention Plus programming.
  • $3,750 to Brighter Path to provide scholarship opportunities for children and adults with disabilities for the therapeutic benefits of equine therapy.
  • $5,250 to Children's Advocacy Center of Randolph County for body safety education for students and adults in all Randolph County schools.
  • $5,090 to Genesis of Richmond to support group-based programming.
  • $5,000 to Independent Living Center of Eastern Indiana for supplies and administrative costs for the local ramp program.
  • $10,875 to JACY House to support personnel costs and program materials for MBF Prevention Education programs in Reid's service area.
  • $2,000 to Love Makes Cents/NATCO Empowerment Center for the implementation of Your Financial Future, a program designed to teach individuals ages 16-30 basic financial skills.
  • $1,300 to Monroe Central Schools for a Sensory Pathway in the halls for Randolph County fourth-sixth-grade students to support social and emotional learning as part of the student environment.
  • $2,900 to Northeastern Elementary School for the development of a sensory room to assist with brain breaks, self-regulation, and classroom re-entry to support the social and emotional learning environment.
  • $7,500 to Preble County Arts Association for art workshops for first responders as a means of self-care and stress relief.
  • $7,000 to Randolph Eastern School Corporation to expand the Leader in Me program to seventh and eighth grades.
  • $7,500 to Servants at Work to build wooden ramps for those with financial need in Reid's service area.
  • $2,500 to Senior Opportunity Services to provide individuals in Wayne County with homemaker services.
  • $11,247 to The Journey Home to support staffing for the Harm Reduction Veterans Outreach Team.
  • $12,480 to The Shepherd's Way (Cross Road Christian Recovery Center) to support implementation of the Wellness Action Recovery Plan for Addictions: Finding Freedom from Unwanted Patterns program.
  • $9,200 to Wayne County Sheriff's Department for DARE programming for Nettle Creek, Western Wayne, Centerville-Abington, Seton Catholic and Northeastern Wayne schools.
  • $11,250 to Whole Family Community Initiative to support the cost of an on-site counselor for the women participating in programming at The House of Ruth.
  • $2,000 to YMCA of Darke County for the Physical Training for Change (PT4C) program that works with adults on probation for drug-related charges to infuse healthy activity as an outlet.

Community benefit is the basis of the tax-exempt status of not-for-profit hospitals. Community benefit is defined as programs or activities that improve access to health services, enhance public health, advance health knowledge through research and education, and/or relieve the burden of government to improve health.

In 2010, the Affordable Care Act added new requirements for tax-exempt hospitals in the areas of community health needs assessment (CHNA), implementation strategy, billing and collections, and reporting. In 2014, the IRS issued final rules implementing these requirements. The goals of these provisions are to ensure tax-exempt hospitals are meeting the health needs of their communities and to ensure greater transparency and accountability.

Grants, along with other specific outreach and requirements to meet Reid Health's not-for-profit status, have put more than $179 million back into the community in the past five years. A committee of Reid's governing board and community members reviews grant requests. The grants are awarded as part of the health system's efforts as a mission-driven, not-for-profit organization.

Recovery Church Richmond Celebrates 2 Year Anniversary

Posted April 21, 2021

Supplied Flyer: Recovery Church Richmond 2 Year Anniversary

You are invited to celebrate with Recovery Church Richmond on Tuesday, April 27th from 5:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. as they celebrate their 2 year anniversary. The Church is located at 1004 North A Street, Richmond. Free dinner begins at 5:30 p.m., testimony and crosses begin at 6:30 p.m. with cake and giveawyas at 7:30 p.m. Questions? Call 765.204.2175.

First Bank Richmond Celebrates IU Day with $10,000 Matching Gift for IU East Cares Crowdfunding Campaign

Posted April 21, 2021

In celebration of IU Day today, Indiana University East launched its IU East Cares Crowdfunding Campaign.

As the Indiana University community celebrates IU Day, First Bank Richmond is celebrating IU East with a $10,000 matching gift opportunity for alumni and friends of the campus for gifts made to the Chancellor's Fund. The Chancellor's Fund supports programs and initiatives to provide unique educational opportunities for IU East students.

First Bank Richmond will match all gifts, up to $500 per donor, given to IU East today, April 21. The total $10,000 matching gift amount is selected as a way to honor the 10,000 IU East alumni.

"First Bank Richmond does so much for the IU East campus and the community," said Vice Chancellor of External Affairs Jason Troutwine. "This year IU Day is back and we are excited to connect with our alumni, campus and community. We are thankful First Bank Richmond is providing a match gift as part of sharing our celebrations, joy and connections as an IU family."

This is also Campus Campaign week for the university, the annual fundraising initiative among faculty and staff for important programs and scholarships on the IU East campus.

First Bank has provided similar match programs in the past for IU Day, which have been well received by the campus community and friends.

Gifts can be made at crowdfunding.iu.edu/iu-east-cares.

LifeStream's Aging Well Conference Rescheduled to 2022

Posted April 21, 2021

LifeStream Services has rescheduled the 17th Annual Aging Well Conference to Thursday, June 2, 2022. This decision was made out of an abundance of caution to help protect the community from the ongoing pandemic and the threat for severe infection for older adults, the event's primary audience.

The Aging Well Conference will be held at the Horizon Convention Center in Muncie. The event is designed for older adults, caregivers, wellness enthusiasts, and health professionals to learn how to make positive changes in their lives and the lives of others. The conference includes a resource fair, light breakfast, lunch, keynote speaker, and educational breakout sessions.

Registration and sponsorship/resource fair information will be released early spring 2022. Those who would like more information or to receive registration information to their home/email may contact Angie Jenkins, Outreach Coordinator, at 765-759-1121 or ajenkins@lifestreaminc.org.

Special thanks to our sponsors: Healing Hands Home Health, Heaven Sent Home Healthcare, Reid Health Alliance Medicare, Community Hospital Anderson, Heart to Heart Hospice, Henry Community Health, Humana, Guardian Medical Monitoring, and Silver Birch of Muncie.

Reid Health – Connersville Opens to Public for Financial Assistance

Posted April 21, 2021

Patients needing financial assistance now can access it at Reid Health - Connersville.

The office on the first floor of the facility at 1941 Virginia Ave. will be open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Facemasks will be required to enter the building, and the office will practice social distancing.

Anyone with questions can call (765) 983-3184 or (855) 753-7125.

News Archives

FacebookYouTubeFlickrTwitter

WayNet is Sponsored by:
Reid Health
We R Richmond - Richmond Community Schools
Morrisson-Reeves Library
City of Richmond, Indiana

Featured Member

Programming and Micros

Community Photo

More Photos:
Wayne County | WayNet Albums

Did You Know?

The first high school orchestra in the nation was established at Morton High School in Richmond, Indiana in 1899 by Joseph Edgar Maddy.