News Releases

Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County Name New Chief Operating Officer

Posted January 24, 2022

Supplied Photo:  Rachel Winters
Rachel Winters, COO

The Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County named Rachel Winters as their new Chief Operating Officer. Winters earned her Bachelor of Science in Social Work at Miami University in 2017 and has served at the Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County's Richard E. Jeffers Unit as Unit Coordinator and Unit Director since 2018.

"I am excited for this next step in my journey with the Boys & Girls Club," Winters said of her new position. "I think it is so important to focus on each of our staff's strengths and foster those to create the best Club experience possible."

The role of Chief Operating Officer is a new position replacing the previous Director of Operations. In this position, Winters is responsible for the Clubs' day-to-day operations, providing strong leadership to staff and volunteers, and implementing new strategic initiatives related to areas such as operations, program services, program expansion, innovation, membership growth, and human resources.

"Rachel is an excellent addition to our Executive Team," Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County Chief Executive Officer Alicia Painter remarked. "Her leadership style balances and compliments my own, and I know from years of working with her that she is a competent, caring professional with a true heart for the Club."

While Winters assumes the role of COO today, she already has aspirations for new Club programming designed to meet the challenges presented by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Winters noted, "Our kids have really had a hard time in the last few years connecting with peers in a way that is healthy and supportive. It is so important that we bring social emotional learning programs into every aspect of Club programming to help them manage their emotions and develop healthy identities."

The mission of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County is to enable all young people, especially those who need us most, to reach their full potential as productive, caring, and responsible citizens. Members of the Club, ages 6-18, have access to dedicated, trained professionals who provide guidance in adopting healthy lifestyles and pursuing educational objectives. Currently, the Club serves over 2,700 youth at five locations: the Jeffers, McDaniel, First Bank, Western Wayne, and Hagerstown units and during the summer at our 168-acre Camp Guy located on the Whitewater River. Since 1957, the Club has been striving to equip young people with the skills they need to succeed in life. For more information, visit www.bgcrichmond.org.

Free Tax Service at MRL

Posted January 18, 2022

Supplied Flyer: MRL Tax ServiceIt's tax time! Why not receive free help with filing your taxes? Free tax preparation assistance provided by AARP's Certified Tax-Aide volunteers is available at Morrisson-Reeves Library starting on February 2nd. This free service is offered through April 15th.

Due to COVID-19 restrictions, the service will be offered by appointment only. Call 765-203-1788 to reserve your time with a tax preparer. Once your appointment is made, instructions will be given for your intake interview and tax document drop-off details. Services include Indiana and Federal Tax form preparation including handy electronic filing.

A dozen certified volunteers will be on hand to assist patrons. Although there are no income restrictions for this service, individuals with tax returns that are deemed too complex will be referred to a tax professional.

For further details, contact the library at 765-966-8291 or online at MRLinfo.org.

It will be necessary to bring the following items in order to be properly served:

  • Last year's tax return
  • Photo ID
  • Social Security cards and birth dates of all names listed on tax returns, including dependents;
  • All W2s, 1099s, and other tax statements received for the tax year;
  • Receipts for deductions including tax receipts;
  • Rent receipts, name and address of landlord if claiming renter's deduction;
  • Care provider's name, address, and identifying number if claiming deduction for Dependent Care;
  • Amount(s) and date(s) of each payment of estimated taxes during the tax year;
  • Voided check or savings account routing numbers for direct deposit of refund.

Highly Contagious Omicron Variant Means You Should Upgrade Your Mask

Posted January 18, 2022

Questions about which masks are best to wear have been with us since the COVID-19 pandemic's beginning, and many are still wearing the cloth masks that became popular when mandates were in place for public spaces.

But with the extremely contagious Omicron variant of the virus now in circulation, it's time to consider an upgrade.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has helpful information about the various kinds of masks and what amount of protection they offer against contracting COVID-19. Whatever type of mask you wear, it's crucial the mask fits well around your nose, mouth, and chin.

All those ages 2 and older who are not vaccinated or boosted should wear a mask in indoor public spaces. Even those who are up to date on their vaccines should wear a mask if they live in an area of substantial or high transmission, which includes the Reid Health service area.

Cloth masks offer the least amount of protection from the virus. Disposable surgical masks are better, and respirators such as KN95 or N95 masks perform the best when fitted properly for the wearer.

Surgical masks are required at all Reid Health facilities. Anyone who comes to Reid without one will have a surgical mask provided to them when they arrive.

"We encourage everyone to replace their cloth masks with disposable surgical masks instead," said Thomas Huth, MD, Vice President of Medical Affairs for Reid Health. "The ease with which Omicron spreads makes it critically important to wear a mask that will offer better protection than what cloth masks provide."

Although scarce in the pandemic's early days, KN95 and N95 respirators are easier to come by today. If you choose to wear one, they must be fitted to form a seal to your face for the maximum level of protection. Specially labeled "surgical" N95 respirators should be reserved for healthcare personnel, according to the CDC.

Masks are just one layer of protection needed to slow the spread of COVID-19. Vaccination remains the best tool we have for safeguarding ourselves, our loved ones, and everyone else we're around.

Reid Health is giving out primary doses and booster shots of the vaccines at Lingle Grand Hall on the lower level of Reid's main campus in Richmond. Hours there are 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays.

You don't have to schedule an appointment or pre-register. Walk-ins are welcome, and there are no long wait times.

For those who would like to make an appointment, Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule a time by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov. You may also call Reid's vaccine clinic directly at (765) 935-8484.

January 18th's COVID-19 Stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 42
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 29 (69%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 9
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 7 (77.8%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 5
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 4 (80%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 728
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 195 (26.8% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 24

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are FREE. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you need to be tested for COVID-19, Reid offers drive-thru testing at 1200 Chester Blvd. in Richmond and at 2025 Virginia Ave. in Connersville. Appointments are required at both sites. The Richmond location is open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily while the Connersville location runs 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. To schedule an appointment, call Reid's COVID-19 Hotline.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Reid Health Donation Will Allow Unused Building to Become a Hub for Social Services

Posted January 18, 2022

Social service agencies plan to turn an unused building in Connersville into a central access point for nutrition, housing, and other programs after Reid Health recently donated the facility to Interlocal Community Action Program Inc. (ICAP).

"We wanted to see the property used for services needed in the community. We felt ICAP would be able to successfully operate from the location, which will provide a central and convenient access point for those in need of services." -- Billie Kester, Reid Health Vice President of Continuum of Care

Reid came into possession of the building at 420 W. 24th St. when the health system assumed ownership of the former Fayette Regional Health System in 2019. The facility was vacant at the time, and it didn't fit Reid's needs.

"We wanted to see the property used for services needed in the community," said Billie Kester, Vice President of Continuum of Care for Reid Health. "We felt ICAP would be able to successfully operate from the location, which will provide a central and convenient access point for those in need of services."

Kevin Polivick, Executive Director of ICAP, said his agency is looking forward to opening the facility this spring.

"On behalf of the clients we serve in Fayette County, we want to thank Reid Health for this generous donation," Polivick said. "We plan to join with other social service agencies to develop a 'hub of services' that will include programs with a focus on nutrition, housing, employment, and training.

"We believe working together is key and with a high level of collaboration between our stakeholders, we can make substantial contributions to both the community and those we serve."

Reid Health Welcomes Unexpected 4-Legged Guest After Fire

Posted January 17, 2022

Supplied Photo: Coco, the dog Whatever the circumstances that bring an individual to Reid Health, the team works hard around the clock to provide excellent care and ensure any needs are met.

Even if that individual isn't human.

An early morning house fire recently brought a surprise to the hospital in the form of a dog named Coco, a very good girl who suddenly needed a place to stay while her family recovered from their injuries.

As the patients were being treated, House Supervisor Vince Kennedy happened to overhear the EMS crew from the Richmond Fire Department wondering what to do with the dog they had in their ambulance, so Kennedy called Jeff Cook, Reid's Director of Engineering and Environmental Services, to see if Reid could help.

As it so happens, the health system's disaster plans include contingencies for sheltering employees' and patients' pets, so an animal crate was already available. Coco herself was no worse for wear after the fire.

"She was dragging me through the hallways," Kennedy said. "She just needed a good bath to get the soot and smoke smell off of her."

Cook asked a member of his team, Jon Norris, to get a crate ready and then make a special shopping trip so Coco would have everything she needed, a new collar and harness, a new leash, a bed for the crate, food from a local company ("Don't buy the cheap stuff and let's support the local economy," Cook told him), and more.

Cook's team is caring for Coco during the day while officers from the Reid Health Police Department make sure she has everything she needs through the night. Over the weekend, Officer Cory Jenkins brought Coco over to the hospital to visit with her family.

"She's really sweet and super friendly," Cook said. "We're going to make her a very spoiled pooch while she's here. It's just really cool to be able to help out this family in a time of need."

Omicron Variant Sends COVID-19 Positivity Rate Soaring

Posted January 17, 2022

Federal health officials have warned the Omicron variant of COVID-19 is highly contagious, more so than Delta or any other previous variant. Evidence of just how easily Omicron spreads can be found in the recent positivity rates for tests done at Reid Health.

Omicron was first detected in South Africa in November, made its way to the United States in the weeks that followed, and eventually was found in Indiana for the first time the weekend before Christmas.

That timeline is reflected in the positivity rates for COVID-19 tests performed by Reid for those months:

  • November: 11.1%
  • December: 16.4%
  • January: 30%

And the numbers continue to climb. This week alone, the positivity rate for tests conducted by Reid has been 39.9%.

Although evidence suggests Omicron is generally milder than the Delta variant, a portion of these cases will lead to hospitalizations at a time when health systems - including Reid Health - are already overwhelmed and in a state of emergency.

The ease with which Omicron spreads comes in part thanks to its ability to at least somewhat evade immunity brought on by a prior infection or the vaccines. Data has shown a booster dose of an mRNA vaccine such as Pfizer or Moderna greatly increases the vaccine's effectiveness against Omicron infection, going from about 35% to about 75%.

The vaccines continue to perform very well in protecting against severe illness, including hospitalization and death.

For that reason, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) strongly encourage COVID-19 vaccination for everyone 5 and older and booster shots for everyone 12 and older. The COVID-19 vaccines are safe, effective, and FREE.

Although the vaccines are the most important layer of protection, even if you're up to date on your shots, there are other things you should be doing to help reduce the spread of the virus:

  • Wear a well-fitting mask over your nose and mouth in indoor public settings and crowded outdoor areas,
  • Avoid crowds and poorly ventilated areas,
  • Stay at least six feet away from others,
  • Wash your hands frequently with soap and water,
  • Get tested if you have symptoms or have been exposed to someone with COVID-19, and
  • Stay home if you're sick.

Reid Health is giving out primary doses and booster shots of the vaccines at Lingle Grand Hall on the lower level ofReid's main campus in Richmond. Hours there are 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays.

You don't have to schedule an appointment or pre-register. Walk-ins are welcome, and there are no long wait times.

For those who would like to make an appointment, Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule a time by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov. You may also call Reid's vaccine clinic directly at (765) 935-8484.

January 14th's COVID-19 Stats

Patients in containment areas: 52

  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 37 (71.2%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 10
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 8 (80%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 9
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 7 (77.8%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 322
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 135 (41.9% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 25

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are FREE. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you need to be tested for COVID-19, Reid offers drive-thru testing at 1200 Chester Blvd. in Richmond and at 2025 Virginia Ave. in Connersville. Appointments are required at both sites. The Richmond location is open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily while the Connersville location runs 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. To schedule an appointment, call Reid's COVID-19 Hotline.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

IU East Establishes $850,000 Endowed Edwin Lewis Pike and Marilynn Craig Pike Scholarship

Posted January 13, 2022

Marilynn C. Pike is remembered as a dedicated teacher who valued education and her students. Now her love for both will continue through a newly established endowed scholarship for students at Indiana University East.

Pike passed away in August 2021, but not before setting up an $850,000 bequest to IU East to establish the endowed scholarship. Now finalized, the scholarship will honor the memory of Pike and her husband, Edwin Lewis Pike, and their support of education.

The Edwin Lewis Pike and Marilynn Craig Pike Scholarship will be awarded annually to one or more students pursuing a degree at IU East. Students may be enrolled in any academic program and must be residents of the state of Indiana in need of financial aid.

The Pike Scholarship recipient(s) will be selected by a committee beginning this spring for the fall 2022 academic year.

As an endowed scholarship, the Pike Scholarship it will generate approximately $38,000 in annual scholarship support.

According to the IU Foundation, an endowed gift is invested and a portion of the principal's earnings are used each year to support our mission. Endowments are created through gifts of cash, securities and other assets invested by the university. Typically, the principle of the endowment is untouched with awards made from a portion of the fund's earnings, generally around 4.5%.

IU East awards scholarships to incoming and current undergraduate students to assist with tuition costs, textbooks, fees, internships, research or creative projects, and travel opportunities.

Each year IU East awards over 70 scholarships in varying amounts to on campus and online students in each of its 50 academic programs.

Information needed to share on costs, percentage of student receiving aid each year, first-generation students receiving aid and any other needed information to share broadly. Each year, IU East students on average have less than $8,000 in tuition costs. During the 2020-21 academic year 71% of degree seeking students at IU East received some sort of financial aid.

Chancellor Kathy Girten said scholarships are extremely important for students to achieve their academic goals.

"We are so grateful for Marilynn's very generous gift endowing this new scholarship for students pursuing their degree at IU East," Girten said.

Marilynn C. Pike was born in Richmond and resident for most of her life. She graduated from New Castle High School before going on to earn her bachelor's degree in education from Indiana University. She then went on to Ball State University for her master's degree in counseling.

Pike taught English at Test Middle School in her native hometown for over 30 years.

An anonymous, close friend and the executor of Pike's trust said that she is dearly missed.

"She was one of those rare teachers who truly changed the lives of her students. Teaching was indeed a calling for her, not just a job. Past students often came to visit her - well into her 90s. She loved hearing about their lives now and the funny stories they would tell about things that happened while in her classroom. Marilynn and her husband were never blessed with children. She always said that this left her more time for her students. She was one of the most dignified, intelligent, caring and humble human beings that I have ever had the pleasure of knowing. I just thought you might enjoy knowing something about this remarkable (and generous) woman."

Girten added the scholarship shows the connection between the campus and the community.

"As an IU alumnus and an educator, Marilynn related to our campus and its mission to provide a high-quality education for students in Wayne County," Girten said. "A respected teacher and mentor in her profession, it is fitting that Marilynn would establish a gift that would continue to support her community long into the future by providing for countless students working toward their degree for years to come."

Todd Duke, interim vice chancellor for External Affairs, said Pike's passion for education is a legacy she will continue through planned giving.

"In the 30 years that Marilynn was a teacher, she prepared her lessons, planned for her students and what each day would bring, and worked to meet those goals. It was important to Marilynn to be the best educator she could be, and she valued a life of learning so much so that she wanted to see others meet their ambitions for a degree," Duke said. "Marilynn's foresight into continuing her passion for education and the legacy she built to care for others is evident through this gift."

Paula Kay King, director of Gift Development, said IU East works closely with individuals who wish to establish or contribute to scholarships in support of students.

"Our students appreciate the support they receive through scholarships. Without the support of these gifts, students may not get to experience all of the opportunities available to them and we wouldn't be able to continue to enhance our academic and extracurricular programs offered at IU East," King said. "Contributions from donors is extremely valuable to providing for our students on so many levels. We couldn't do this without the support of the community, and we are thankful for each gift."

For information on how to contribute, contact Paula Kay King, director of Gift Development, at (765) 973-8331 or pkayking@iue.edu.

Application Deadline for Teacher Scholarship and Stipends Approaching

Posted January 13, 2022

Students have until January 31 to apply for $7,500 scholarship and other teaching stipends

(INDIANAPOLIS) – Students in high school or college who are planning to teach or work in school administration in the State of Indiana have until January 31 to apply for one scholarship and two teaching stipends.

The Indiana Commission for Higher Education is encouraging students to act quickly, as there is limited funding available. All three financial aid opportunities can be applied for at ScholarTrack.IN.gov.

"Educators play a pivotal role in preparing students for higher education and the workforce," said Indiana Commissioner for Higher Education Teresa Lubbers. "The Commission is pleased to provide these financial aid opportunities to fund future educators' higher education and build Indiana's teacher pipeline."

Scholarship:

Next Generation Hoosier Educators Scholarship: The Next Generation Hoosier Educators Scholarship provides 200 high-achieving high school and college students interested in pursuing a career in education the opportunity to earn a renewable scholarship of up to $7,500 each year during up to four academic years. In exchange, students agree to teach for five years at an eligible Indiana school or repaythe corresponding, prorated amount of the scholarship. The Commission will review all applications and notify applicants of their scholarship status via email by March 18, 2022. For instructions on how to apply, and for a full list of eligibility requirements, visit learnmoreindiana.org/futureteacher.

Stipends:
  • Earline S. Rogers Student Teaching Stipend for Minorities: This stipend is available to minority students (defined as Black or Hispanic and Latino individuals) who plan to participate in student teaching or a school administration internship as part of their degree requirements during the semester they receive the stipend. The maximum amount a student may receive is up to $4,000. Priority will be given to student teaching applicants.
  • Student Teaching Stipend for High-Need Fields: The Student Teaching Stipend for High-Need Fields is available to students who plan to teach special education (any grade), middle school math, middle school science, high school math or high school science. The maximum amount a student may receive is up to $4,000.

For questions about state financial aid, students can contact the Indiana Commission for Higher Education by phone at 888-528-4719 or via email at awards@che.in.gov.

Why Does CDC Guidance Keep Changing? We're Learning More About COVID-19

Posted January 13, 2022

One constant throughout the COVID-19 pandemic has been the need to keep up with the latest safety guidelines issued by federal health officials. Although some of those remain unchanged -- advice to wear a mask, social distance, and wash your hands goes back to the beginning -- others have been tweaked over the past two years.

In the past few weeks alone, federal health officials have made several changes to guidance around booster shots (see here, here, and here) and isolation/quarantine timelines.

Although it can be frustrating trying to stay up to date with the latest news coming from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the shifting guidelines are a good sign: We're learning more about COVID-19 every day.

When the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19 first appeared, there were many questions about how easily it could be transmitted, how severe was the illness it caused, and how best we could fight back. Those answers eventually came, only for the virus to mutate multiple times, creating variants with their own set of questions.

Even when the first vaccines became available, we knew from trial studies they were effective against the virus, but we didn't know how long that effectiveness would last or how well the vaccines would hold up against whatever variants might come along.

Last fall, it became clear from studies and other data immunity from the vaccines had begun to wane for those who had been among the first to receive the shots. As a result, boosters were approved. Then came the highly transmissible Omicron variant with its ability to at least somewhat evade immunity created by the first vaccine doses. That led to the CDC moving up the timeline for booster shots.

As we learned more about how Omicron is spread and it became the dominant form of the virus, federal health officials realized the isolation and quarantine guidelines could change, so adjustments were made to those as well.

Yes, it can be frustrating trying to keep straight what's changed and what hasn't, but each new piece of information brings us that much closer to the end of the pandemic. For now, keep these measures in mind:

  • Get vaccinated,
  • If you're vaccinated, get boosted,
  • Wear a well-fitting mask over your nose and mouth in indoor public settings and crowded outdoor areas,
  • Avoid crowds and poorly ventilated areas,
  • Stay at least six feet away from others,
  • Wash your hands frequently with soap and water,
  • Get tested if you have symptoms or have been exposed to someone with COVID-19, and
  • Stay home if you're sick.

Reid Health is giving out primary doses and booster shots at Lingle Grand Hall on the lower level of Reid's main campus in Richmond. Hours there are 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays.

You don't have to schedule an appointment or pre-register. Walk-ins are welcome, and there are no long wait times.

For those who would like to make an appointment, Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule a time by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov. You may also call Reid's vaccine clinic directly at (765) 935-8484.

January 13th's COVID-19 Stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 58
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 39 (67.2%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 8
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 6 (75%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 8
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 6 (75%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 356
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 81 (22.8% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 36

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are FREE. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you need to be tested for COVID-19, Reid offers drive-thru testing at 1200 Chester Blvd. in Richmond and at 2025 Virginia Ave. in Connersville. Appointments are required at both sites. The Richmond location is open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily while the Connersville location runs 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. To schedule an appointment, call Reid's COVID-19 Hotline.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Booster Timing for Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine Moved Up a Month

Posted January 10, 2022

Federal health officials have moved up the booster shot timing for Moderna's COVID-19 vaccine, bringing it in line with the Pfizer vaccine, which also uses mRNA technology to create an immune response to the virus.

Those who received either of the two-dose vaccines should now get a booster five months after their second dose. Previously, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) had recommended booster shots six months after the second dose.

For those who received the one-shot Johnson & Johnson vaccine, the guideline for getting a booster remains two months after their initial dose.

The change comes because of the rapid rise of the highly contagious Omicron variant, which has shown an ability to at least somewhat evade immunity brought about by a previous infection or the initial series of the vaccines.

Data has shown a booster dose of an mRNA vaccine such as Pfizer or Moderna greatly increases the vaccine's effectiveness against Omicron infection, going from about 35% to about 75%. The vaccines continue to perform very well in protecting against severe illness, including hospitalization and death.

Federal health officials strongly encourage COVID-19 vaccination for everyone 5 and older and booster shots for everyone 16 and older. The COVID-19 vaccines are safe, effective, and FREE.

Reid Health is giving out primary doses and booster at Lingle Grand Hall on the lower level of Reid's main campus in Richmond. Hours there are 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays.

You don't have to schedule an appointment or pre-register. Walk-ins are welcome, and there are no long wait times.

For those who would like to make an appointment, Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule a time by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.

January 10th's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 52
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 37 (71.2%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 10
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 7 (70%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 9
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 7 (77.8%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 1,088
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 244 (22.4% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 16

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are FREE. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you need to be tested for COVID-19, Reid offers drive-thru testing at 1200 Chester Blvd. in Richmond and at 2025 Virginia Ave. in Connersville. Appointments are required at both sites. The Richmond location is open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily while the Connersville location runs 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. To schedule an appointment, call Reid's COVID-19 Hotline.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Wayne County Area Chamber of Commerce, IU East and RAM Announce Postponements to Upcoming Events

Posted January 10, 2022

In consideration of the health and safety of the community and the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, the Wayne County Area Chamber of Commerce, Indiana University East and Richmond Art Museum (RAM) have mutually determined the best course of action is to postpone their respective upcoming public events, the Chamber Annual Dinner and Palate to Palette, until a later time.

The three organizations considered the size of the events, with regular attendance of hundreds of guests, and that the events are held in indoor venues. Additionally, Wayne County is experiencing a rise in coronavirus cases putting a strain on the health care system. With these considerations in mind, the boards and university determined the best course of action was to postpone the events.

This year's Wayne County Area Chamber of Commerce's Annual Dinner and Awards, themed "Wayneopoly," was originally scheduled for January 21. The Chamber recognizes businesses, organizations and individuals for their work and accomplishments during the dinner.

Palate to Palette is a collaborative fundraiser to benefit RAM programming and the IU East Department of Fine Arts. This year's event, "Under the Boardwalk," was scheduled for February 5. Individuals who have purchased tickets and sponsors with tickets for the event will be contacted soon.

While the events are postponed for now, IU East, RAM and the Chamber fully believe events such as these continue to be important for the community in order to raise funds, to show support and appreciation for area businesses and individuals for their dedicated efforts and accomplishments, to support the arts, and to foster close community connections.

Updates for Palate to Palette and the Chamber Annual Dinner will be shared at a later time. For updates regarding the Chamber Annual Dinner, visit WCAreaChamber.org/AD2022. For information on Palate to Palette, contact 765-973-8514 or pkayking@iue.edu.

Some COVID-19 Vaccinated People Are Getting Sick; That Doesn't Mean the Vaccines Don't Work

Posted January 10, 2022

On any given day, about 70-80% of the COVID-19 patients at Reid Health Hospital are not fully vaccinated. Some who are still skeptical of vaccination look at that number and perceive this as evidence the vaccines don't work.

"We thought the vaccines would prevent everyone from getting sick, so why are there vaccinated people in the hospital?" they ask.

There are several reasons why a small number -- about 3.7% in Indiana -- of those who have been vaccinated might still get sick.

They might have an underlying condition that compromises their immune system and prevents the vaccines from doing their best work such as cancer, a recent organ transplant, HIV, or even old age.

But the two primary reasons why some vaccinated people might now get infected with COVID-19 are waning immunity and a highly mutated variant of the virus, both of which we've known could pose problems since the vaccines were first administered more than a year ago.

The push to get vaccines in as many arms as fast as possible always was a race against time. How long immunity from the vaccines would last wasn't known at first, and the more the virus spread, the more likely it was that a trouble-causing variant would appear.

"The longer it takes to get people vaccinated, the higher the likelihood that one of these variants could catch hold or even a new one might pop up that the vaccines are less effective against," Thomas Huth, MD, Vice President of Medical Affairs for Reid Health said back in April 2021.

The good news is the vaccines still work. They remain highly effective in protecting against severe illness, including hospitalizations and death. Booster shots have proven to restore much of the vaccines' effectiveness in preventing infection from the virus, even from the Omicron variant.

And here we are. We've come to a time when many of those who were vaccinated last year have waning immunity while at the same time a new, highly contagious variant called Omicron has taken off thanks in part to its ability to at least somewhat evade immunity brought on by a prior infection or the vaccines.

The good news is the vaccines still work. They remain highly effective in protecting against severe illness, including hospitalizations and death. Booster shots have proven to restore much of the vaccines' effectiveness in preventing infection from the virus, even from the Omicron variant.

Vaccination is the best tool we have available to fight COVID-19, yet too many of us remain unvaccinated, creating the conditions in which we find ourselves today, with a state of emergency at Reid Health and other hospitals around the region.

FREE primary doses and booster shots of the COVID-19 vaccines are available at Lingle Grand Hall on the lower level of Reid's main campus in Richmond. Hours there are 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) now says everyone ages 12 and older should get a booster shot. At this time, only the two-shot Pfizer vaccine has been approved for those under the age of 18. Pfizer recipients should get their booster five months after their second dose.

Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.

January 7th's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 56
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 39 (69.6%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 10
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 8 (80%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 9
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 8 (88.9%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 264
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 101 (38.3% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 19

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are FREE. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you need to be tested for COVID-19, Reid offers drive-thru testing at 1200 Chester Blvd. in Richmond and at 2025 Virginia Ave. in Connersville. Appointments are required at both sites. The Richmond location is open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily while the Connersville location runs 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. To schedule an appointment, call Reid's COVID-19 Hotline.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Pfizer COVID-19 Vaccine Recipients Now Eligible for a Booster Shot a Month Earlier

Posted January 5, 2022

Those age 16 and older who receive the two-shot Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine now only need to wait 5 months after their primary doses before they can get a booster shot.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) this week updated recommendations for Pfizer boosters as well as for third doses for moderately or severely immunocompromised children.

Guidelines for booster shots of the vaccines from Moderna (6 months after the primary doses) and Johnson & Johnson (2 months after the initial dose) remain unchanged.

The CDC also now recommends moderately or severely immunocompromised kids ages 5-11 get a third primary dose of the vaccine 28 days after their second shot, lowering the age limit for third primary doses from the previous threshold of 12 years old. Only the Pfizer vaccine has been authorized for those under the age of 18.

Changes in the recommendations come as the highly contagious Omicron variant sweeps across the country -- thanks in part to its ability to at least somewhat evade immunity brought on by prior infections and vaccination -- creating new spikes in the number of infections

.

Data has shown a booster dose of an mRNA vaccine such as Pfizer or Moderna greatly increases the vaccine's effectiveness against Omicron infection, going from about 35% to about 75%. The vaccines continue to perform very well in protecting against severe illness, including hospitalization and death.

Federal health officials strongly encourage COVID-19 vaccination for everyone 5 and older and boosters for everyone 16 and older.

The COVID-19 vaccines are safe, effective, and FREE. Reid Health is giving out primary doses and booster shots at Lingle Grand Hall on the lower level of Reid's main campus in Richmond. Hours there are 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays.

Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.

January 5th's COVID-19 Stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 67
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 45 (67.2%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 13
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 10 (76.9%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 9
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 8 (88.9%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 253
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 102 (40.3% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 21

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are FREE. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you need to be tested for COVID-19, Reid offers drive-thru testing at 1200 Chester Blvd. in Richmond and at 2025 Virginia Ave. in Connersville. Appointments are required at both sites. The Richmond location is open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily while the Connersville location runs 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. To schedule an appointment, call Reid's COVID-19 Hotline.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Kids Ages 12-15 years Old Can Now Get COVID-19 Vaccine Booster Shots

Posted January 10, 2022

With the Omicron variant's ability to at least somewhat evade immunity created by prior COVID-19 infections and the vaccines, federal health officials have expanded booster shot eligibility to kids ages 12-15 years old.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) now says everyone ages 12 and older should get a booster shot. At this time, only the two-shot Pfizer vaccine has been approved for those under the age of 18. Pfizer recipients should get their booster five months after their second dose.

Data has shown a booster shot of an mRNA vaccine such as Pfizer or Moderna greatly increases the vaccine's effectiveness against Omicron infection, going from about 35% to about 75%. The vaccines continue to perform very well in protecting against severe illness, including hospitalization and death.

In making the decision to expand booster shot eligibility, the CDC reviewed available safety data from more than 25 million vaccine doses given to adolescents. That data showed the vaccines continue to be safe and effective.

Although COVID-19 infection has typically led to less serious illness in children than adults, they can still get sick -- sometimes severely or even deathly so -- and they can pass it along to others who might be more vulnerable to the virus such as older family members, caregivers, teachers and staff members at their schools, or even others their own age who might be immunocompromised or have other underlying health conditions.

Getting your child vaccinated not only protects themselves but also your family and all those who come into contact with your child.

FREE primary doses and booster shots of the COVID-19 vaccines are available at Lingle Grand Hall on the lower level of Reid's main campus in Richmond. Hours there are 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays.

Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov. Parents or legal guardians of minor children who will be vaccinated need to be present at the time of vaccination.

January 6th's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 62
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 44 (71%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 11
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 9 (81.8%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 8
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 7 (87.5%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 312
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 80 (25.6% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 18

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are FREE. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you need to be tested for COVID-19, Reid offers drive-thru testing at 1200 Chester Blvd. in Richmond and at 2025 Virginia Ave. in Connersville. Appointments are required at both sites. The Richmond location is open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily while the Connersville location runs 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. To schedule an appointment, call Reid's COVID-19 Hotline.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Even if Omicron Proves More Mild, High Rates of Infection Will Still Make Emergency Worse

Posted January 5, 2022

Since the Omicron variant of the virus that causes COVID-19 was first reported in November, there has been a push to discover as much about it as fast as possible, including how quickly it spreads and how severe it is compared to other variants.

Today, we know Omicron is very transmissible -- even more so than the highly contagious Delta variant -- thanks in part to its ability to at least somewhat evade immunity brought on by prior infections and vaccination.

The severity of the illness caused by Omicron remains under study, but even if it proves to be milder than the Delta variant, Omicron's ease of spread is still expected to create another spike in cases, some of which will lead to hospitalizations at a time when health systems -- including Reid Health -- are already overwhelmed and in a state of emergency thanks to the Delta variant.

The CDC says data from South Africa and the United Kingdom show vaccine effectiveness against Omicron infection for two doses of an mRNA vaccine -- Pfizer and Moderna -- is about 35%. A booster dose moves that effectiveness against infection up to about 75%, but the vaccines continue to perform very well in protecting against severe illness, including hospitalization and death.

Federal health officials strongly encourage COVID-19 vaccination for everyone 5 and older and boosters for everyone 16 and older.

Although the vaccines are the most important layer of protection, even if you're up to date on your shots, there are other things you should be doing to help reduce the spread of the virus:

  • Wear a well-fitting mask over your nose and mouth in indoor public settings and crowded outdoor areas,
  • Avoid crowds and poorly ventilated areas,
  • Stay at least six feet away from others,
  • Wash your hands frequently with soap and water,
  • Get tested if you have symptoms or have been exposed to someone with COVID-19, and
  • Stay home if you're sick.

The COVID-19 vaccines are safe, effective, and FREE. Reid Health is giving out primary doses and booster shots at Lingle Grand Hall on the lower level of Reid's main campus in Richmond. Hours there are 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays.

Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.

January 4th's COVID-19 Stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 71
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 49 (69%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 13
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 11 (84.6%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 9
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 8 (88.9%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 264
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 19 (7.2% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 25

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are FREE. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you need to be tested for COVID-19, Reid offers drive-thru testing at 1200 Chester Blvd. in Richmond and at 2025 Virginia Ave. in Connersville. Appointments are required at both sites. The Richmond location is open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily while the Connersville location runs 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. To schedule an appointment, call Reid's COVID-19 Hotline.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Reid Health EMS Expands Ambulance Service in Wayne County

Posted January 5, 2022

Supplied Photo: Reid Health AmbulanceReid Health's emergency ambulance service has expanded to include most of the Wayne County area.

In October, the Wayne County Board of Commissioners awarded Reid Health EMS a five-year contract to provide emergency ambulance service beginning in 2022 to all areas of the county with the exceptions of the City of Richmond and Wayne Township, which will continue to be served by the Richmond Fire Department.

"We're excited to continue to build upon our already-high-quality EMS program," said Ryan Williams, Director of EMS, Forensics, and Trauma Services for Reid Health. "We look forward to providing that same great level of care to Wayne County residents in these areas in the years ahead."

Reid began providing emergency ambulance services in 2019 when it was awarded the contract for southwestern Wayne County after the county's initial request for bids went without a provider for that area.

Reid Health EMS has since grown to include Union County, starting service there at the beginning of 2021.

"We're thrilled to be able to expand our service to more of the Wayne County area," said Misti Foust-Cofield, Vice President/Chief Nursing Officer for Reid Health. "It's our mission to lead our communities to well-being, one person at a time, and the growth of our EMS program is part of that."

As a result of the new contract with the county, Reid has worked with Culberson Ambulance Service to create a smooth transition for the northwestern Wayne County residents that Culberson had served for nearly 52 years. Owner Rick Culberson recently announced his retirement from the ambulance service.

"I want to thank Ryan Williams for all of his cooperation with this transition," Culberson said. "Whatever the replacement organization was going to be, I wanted to be sure it had the ability to demonstrate sustainability into the future. Reid has shown that."

"We're excited to continue to build upon our already-high-quality EMS program. We look forward to providing that same great level of care to Wayne County residents in these areas in the years ahead." -- Ryan Williams, Director of EMS, Forensics, and Trauma Services for Reid Health

Reid has an ambulance stationed at the former Culberson location in Hagerstown and has hired some of the Culberson crew members as part of the transition.

"The service Rick Culberson and his staff have provided deserves recognition by everyone in the community," Williams said. "There is no better way a person can serve their neighbors than by assisting them in their greatest time of need and with the pride and commitment shown by Culberson Ambulance Service for more than 50 years."

In the eastern part of the county, Reid takes over for Red Line EMS, which plans to continue to provide education in the area through EMT and Advanced EMT classes.

"We thank Red Line for their years of service and plan to continue working with and supporting them in the future," Williams said. "They have been and will continue to be an important piece of the first responder community."

Patients transported by Reid EMS do not have to be taken to Reid Health Hospital for care. Patients can request to be transported to a nearby hospital of their choice, provided their choice is suitable for the level of care they require.

All Reid EMS ambulances are staffed 24/7 with a paramedic-level crew of at least one paramedic and one EMT. In Wayne County, Reid ambulances are stationed in Cambridge City, Hagerstown, and Richmond.

Monoclonal Antibody Treatment Clinic Moving to Former Elder-Beerman Building

Posted January 3, 2022

Reid Health's COVID-19 monoclonal antibody treatment clinic will move this week from its current location on Richmond's west side to the former Elder-Beerman building downtown.

Monoclonal antibodies are a treatment designed to help your immune system fight viruses. The U.S. Food & Drug Administration has given Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) for their use in adults and children who are at least 12 years of age, who weigh at least 88 pounds, and who are at high risk for severe COVID-19.

Beginning Wednesday, Reid will give the infusions at the former Elder-Beerman building at 601 E. Main St. The move was made necessary when sewer issues were discovered recently at the Reid Plaza site. Those issues do not affect Reid's PACE Center or any of the tenants occupying other suites at the plaza.

Those needing monoclonal antibody treatment will enter the former Elder-Beerman building on its south side next to the parking lot. Patients should call (765) 993-5496 when they arrive before entering.

For those who qualify, monoclonal antibodies can be used to treat mild to moderate symptoms of COVID-19. Treatment can be provided up to 10 days after the onset of symptoms, but it's most effective when administered within no more than four days.

Under the EUA, being high risk means meeting at least one of the following criteria:

  • Being at least 65 years old
  • Having a body mass index (BMI) of at least 35
  • Being pregnant
  • Having chronic kidney disease
  • Having diabetes
  • Having an immunosuppressive disease
  • Currently receiving an immunosuppressive treatment
  • Having cardiovascular disease or hypertension
  • Having chronic lung diseases
  • Having sickle cell disease
  • Having neurodevelopmental disorders or conditions that require ongoing specialized care
  • Having a medical-related technological dependence (for example, tracheostomy, gastrostomy, or positive pressure ventilation)

If you meet the criteria for a monoclonal antibody infusion, don't wait until you feel poorly to talk with your physician. Once you qualify for hospital admission, you no longer meet the requirements for monoclonal antibody treatment.

Patients need a physician's referral to get an appointment for treatment. If you do not have a primary care provider or it's the weekend, call Reid's COVID-19 Hotline at (765) 965-4200 for help. The hotline is available 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a week.

Hotline staff also can help with scheduling COVID-19 testing, getting test results, or with clinical advice.

January 3rd's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 67
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 47 (70.1%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 14
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 13 (92.9%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 8
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 8 (100%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 805
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 249 (30.9% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 17

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are FREE. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you need to be tested for COVID-19, Reid offers drive-thru testing at 1200 Chester Blvd. in Richmond and at 2025 Virginia Ave. in Connersville. Appointments are required at both sites. The Richmond location is open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily while the Connersville location runs 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. To schedule an appointment, call Reid's COVID-19 Hotline.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Paysleigh Makes It Through COVID to Arrive as Reid's First Baby of 2022

Posted January 3, 2022

For Valerie Scalf, her second pregnancy went much different than her first nine years ago. There's the COVID-19 pandemic to thank for that.

Scalf caught the virus in her second trimester. Fever, chills, and body aches led to congestion and coughing. It was about a week and a half before she finally tested negative for COVID.

"I had a doctor's appointment every week with a stress test and an ultrasound on top of it," the Richmond resident said.

Thankfully, Scalf made it through the illness OK, eventually leading to the birth of her daughter, Paysleigh, in time to be Reid Health's first baby of 2022.

Paysleigh was born at 7:32 p.m. on New Year's Day after about eight hours of labor. When Scalf first arrived at the hospital, she wasn't anticipating having a baby that same day.

"I came in because I thought I had a UTI or something, but it was really labor. I didn't have anything wrong," she laughed.

"After they told me I was going to have a baby, they told me I was going to have the first if I did it right. I was like, 'Alright, here we go.'"

When it came time to begin pushing, Paysleigh made her arrival quickly.

"Three pushes and she was out," dad Zachary Bennett said.

"She was making her entrance," Scalf said.

Paysleigh was born at 19 inches long, weighing 6 pounds and 10.3 ounces.

Community Generates Over $1.86 Million in 2021 Challenge Match

Posted January 3, 2022

The Wayne County Foundation is pleased to announce the results of the 2021 Challenge Match. Over the nine-day match period between November 1-9, 2021, forty local nonprofit organizations collectively raised over $1.6 million from their generous donors. This amount, plus the Foundation matching funds, represents over $1.86 million in total contributed to benefit the community. All of the funds raised during this program go directly to the organization's operating costs.

The Challenge Match was an opportunity for participating organizations to share up to $275,000 in matching funds from the Foundation, based on qualifying gifts they received from the community in the designated match period. 2021 represented the tenth consecutive year the program was offered, and also one of the largest amounts raised in program history.

'The Challenge Match was first implemented in 2012 as a means to assist our local nonprofits raise critical operating dollars and to enhance the spirit of charitable giving in our community,' said Rebecca Gilliam, Wayne County Foundation Executive Director. 'Over the past decade, we feel like we have accomplished these goals. As a Foundation, we remain in awe of the generosity of the program's donors - they help make all of this possible.'

The program also featured several match partners, including David and Carla Stidham, Doxpop Charitable Giving Fund, First Bank Community Fund, Fund for Tomorrow, and the Second Chance Fund.

'We would like to thank our match partners for giving so generously,' Gilliam said. 'Also, our participating organizations did a wonderful job of effectively spreading their respective missions to galvanize their donors once again.'

Auxiliary Makes Record Donation to Reid Health Foundation

Posted January 3, 2022

Despite the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, the Reid Health Auxiliary continues to make record donations to the Reid Health Foundation.

The latest came this month when the auxiliary's board members presented Randy Kirk, Reid Health Vice President/President of Reid Health Foundation, with a check for $370,000, which was $45,000 more than last year's record-setting total.

"I couldn't be more pleased. It's the most joyous thing I've done in 2021," said John Herig, president of the auxiliary board. "I can't think of anything better than being able to present our foundation with what is an exceptional donation considering the circumstances."

The auxiliary raises money year-round with special sales and through the hospital's gift shop, the Ginkgo Boutique, which is wholly owned and operated by the auxiliary. All proceeds from the gift shop and other activities are presented to the foundation annually.

"The impact of the work of this auxiliary and of Gingko Boutique is off the charts. There is no peer in the country for what you are giving," Kirk said. "For all the programs you'll support this year and the purchases of equipment and the impact in multiple service areas -- on behalf of all those patients in the future who are beneficiaries of what you have done -- thank you."

"I couldn't be more pleased. It's the most joyous thing I've done in 2021. I can't think of anything better than being able to present our foundation with what is an exceptional donation considering the circumstances." -- John Herig, President of the Reid Health Auxiliary Board

Since its formation in 1948, the auxiliary has now given more than $4.56 million to the foundation. The money is used to support patient care at Reid Health, including technology and equipment needs. Past donations have funded items such as the green roof installed over a portion of the main campus, the grand piano in the atrium, pediatric therapy equipment, chemotherapy chairs, and defibrillators.

The auxiliary's officers for 2022 will include Herig as president, Electa Berk as president-elect, David Garman as past president, Virginia Thompson as treasurer, Pat Shuck as assistant treasurer, John Reddington as recording secretary, Becky Russell as assistant recording secretary, and Patsy Goble as corresponding secretary.

Auxiliary volunteers donate their time across Reid Health with some 200 active in various departments.

For information about volunteering at Reid, visit reidhealth.org/volunteer-opportunities.

Logans Reign Supreme in Service and Giving; Scholarship Endowed

Posted January 3, 2022

Supplied Photo: Jerry and Terri Logan
Dr. Jerry Logan and Terri Logan established an endowed scholarship to benefit fine arts at IU East.

Jerry Logan is the Supreme Court justice of Indiana University alumni.

So say those who've known him as a perpetual booster and board member for about 50 years.

Of course, the honorary title is not because he hands down judicial rulings.

It's because he has garnered so much respect through decades of continuous service on local and statewide alumni boards.

It's because he is a hands-on, tireless worker who is laser-focused on helping more students get into the Indiana University system -- whether it's at Bloomington, IU East or any IU campus.

It's because he and his wife, Terri, give so generously to help students in optometry and the arts, fields that they studied at IU Bloomington and then turned into highly successful careers.

In fact, they recently endowed the Jerry & Terri Logan Fine Art Scholarship at IU East with gifts totaling $50,000.

The scholarship is designed to help more IU East students to achieve success -- and also to lead the way to more gifts. "We hope that our scholarship will entice others to either join our scholarship or start one of their own in fine arts," Jerry Logan said.

"We both feel that we owe IU a lot and want to give back. We are excited about the opportunity to introduce students to art in hopes that some will decide to make it their career," he added.

Terri agrees: "It's the perfect place to help, to give back to the community and artists ... make the journey a little easier and more likely," she said.

The scholarship for undergraduates in fine arts is the first for IU East, King believes.

"Their goal is to truly make an impact for fine arts students at IU East. Each year, they look forward to meeting with the scholarship recipient to hear how their classes are going," King said. "This gives the scholarship recipient the opportunity to learn more about the Logans and why they created the scholarship. It also gives the student a chance to thank them for their generosity. We are grateful for the support the Logans provide our students at IU East."

The Logans both lived in Winchester and knew each other during their high school years, but she was most often away at a college-prep school. They connected during a fateful summer event after her senior year. "We danced one dance and that was it," she said about the beginning of their 55-year partnership in life.

They settled in Richmond, where they raised two children, Ryan and Greg. She worked in psychotherapy for nearly two decades, often blending art forms into her treatment, before turning her attention to creating unique pieces of jewelry as a full-time artist.

Jerry Logan opened his optometrical practice in 1969 and soon started serving on IU alumni boards.

His involvement with IU East reaches back to the mid-1960s when he took a class during a summer break. Classes then were held at Earlham College -- and IU East didn't officially become a regional site of the Indiana University system until 1971.

"I've seen it go from one building to five," he boasts. "It's been very enjoyable to see how that has benefited the community."

It's also given him great joy to serve in every role on alumni boards.

He can't remember the last year he didn't serve as secretary of a local board. "They think I am kind of a Supreme Court justice," he jokes. "I have been secretary forever."

The supreme designation certainly has its merits, said Terry Wiesehan, director of Alumni and Campus Ceremonies at IU East. Everyone else serves two- and three-year terms, but, "He doesn't rotate off," Wiesehan said. "He is amazing."

His office-holding reaches into service clubs, too, such as the Kiwanis and Jaycees. "After so many years being so involved, I kind of take it for granted," Terri Logan said. "He's a lovely, generous man."

Logan's role now with the regional alumni board involves compiling minutes after meetings and sending out the next agenda to members.

IU East recently merged its alumni chapters that serve the campus and Eastern Central Indiana, renaming the board to the East Region Chapter of the IU Alumni Association.

Logan also has served on IU's optometry board in every major role.

He has served several terms on the executive council of the IU Alumni Association and also been on the IU Optometry Dean's Advisory Council. He is a recipient of the 2018 IU School of Optometry Foley House Basement Key Award, presented to an alumnus/a who has demonstrated exceptional dedication and/or service to the school. In honor of his service to the School of Optometry, he was awarded an IU Bicentennial Medal in 2020. The bicentennial medals were awarded to organizations and individuals who, through their personal, professional, artistic, or philanthropic efforts, broadened the reach of IU around the state, nation, and world.

In 2013, the Logans were included into the Presidents Circle which honors Indiana University's most generous donors. Many of these men and women have helped define the very character of IU. Lifetime membership is offered to individuals and households that have irrevocably transferred assets to Indiana University.

Perpetuity and leadership are important to the Logans.

"My wife and I feel strongly about the importance of education. Having her degree in art, we wanted to encourage (students) to explore the possibilities," Jerry Logan said.

They want to help IU East in part because it is a school of possibilities for so many people in Richmond and the surrounding area, he said. "It's offered education to a lot who wouldn't have had that opportunity."

The Logans also have endowed a similar scholarship for aspiring optometrists at the IU School of Optometry.

Jerry Logan is grateful about what his IU degrees have meant professionally -- and personally.

"It just changed my whole life. I met friends, grew as a person," he said. "I have loved my profession and helping people. IU made that possible."

Jerry and Terri Logan still spend a lot of time in Bloomington, where they own half of a duplex.

They enjoy the large variety of restaurants, concerts and activities there. They are longtime season-ticket holders for Hoosiers basketball and football.

Both are winding down their careers.

"Until COVID hit, I was working full time," Jerry Logan said.

Drs. Logan & Bailey Optometrists was forced to close for a while and he then started working three days a week after it reopened.

"I still enjoy what I do," Jerry Logan said. "It's worked out well."

Terri Logan is a nationally recognized jewelry artist who semi-retired two years ago. "I quit doing shows and stayed with a handful of galleries (that display and sell her works)," she said. "I make what I want ... It's all my choice, my time, when I want to make it."

She is the owner of Terri Logan Studios. She has received many awards and prestigious gallery placements, including regular representation in the annual SOFA exhibitions.

Previously, she also served as a member of the Art Advisory Committee at IU East and as a member of the Whitewater Valley Chapter of the Alumni Association.

The Logans also encourage others to give when they can.

"We ask you to support fine arts by considering making a gift to the scholarship fund we have created," Jerry Logan said.

For information on how to contribute, contact Paula Kay King, director of Gift Development, at (765) 973-8331 or pkayking@iue.edu.

History Repeats as Reid Provides Jacy House With 2nd Building

Posted January 3, 2022

Some 18 years ago, Reid Health was able to help a local nonprofit in need, allowing JACY House to move into an unused building close to Chester Boulevard in Richmond. This year, Reid again has come to the group's aid, making a second, nearby building available so JACY House could expand.

A ribbon-cutting ceremony recently took place for the renovated facility at 1400 Chester Blvd., the former office of James Parliament, MD, and now the main building for JACY House.

Also known as the Justice and Advocacy Center for Youth, JACY House provides a safe, child-friendly atmosphere where specially trained staff can conduct forensic interviews in cases of alleged child abuse. The organization also provides prevention programs in local schools.

"We're so grateful for the amazing things that our new building can offer our staff and the families we serve," said Amanda Wilson, Executive Director of JACY House. "Our new family room provides families with comfortable seating, a play area for children, and their own bathroom so they're secure and their confidentiality is well protected.

"We're so grateful for the amazing things that our new building can offer our staff and the families we serve. Our new family room provides families with comfortable seating, a play area for children, and their own bathroom so they're secure and their confidentiality is well protected." -- Amanda Wilson, Executive Director of JACY House

"As this is a trying time for non-offending caregivers and their children, we strive to give them an environment that is warm and friendly to ease some nerves and fears as best we can."

Since 2003, Reid has provided the facility at 2 Quaker Hill Drive to the organization, maintaining the site and paying for utilities at no cost to JACY House. The same arrangement now is in place for the building at 1400 Chester Blvd.

Reid Community Benefit also has given grant funding to JACY House to help with prevention programs, a total of $54,625 over the past five years alone.

"This is wonderful organization, and we are pleased to provide support because they are working every day to reduce adverse childhood experiences and impact trauma in our communities," said Angela Cline, Director of Community Benefit.

Work to renovate the 1400 Chester Blvd. facility was donated by Shook Construction, Cummins Electric, Beard Masonry, Reynolds Plumbing, and others.

LifeStream Services is Recognized for Vaccination Rate

Posted January 3, 2022

LifeStream Services has been recognized as a Bronze COVID Stops Here workplace for achieving a 70% vaccination rate. The COVID Stops Here campaign recognizes Indiana workplaces that have achieved widespread vaccination against COVID-19. Organizations that have achieved at least a 70% vaccination are eligible to receive a designation.

It is critical that Hoosiers work together to stop the spread of coronavirus – including the dangerous new Delta and Omicron variants. Vaccination is the best way to stop COVID-19.

"Our employees recognize that they work with an at-risk population and know that the vaccine is the best way to protect both our clients and ourselves," said DeDe Davis, HR/Benefit Officer at LifeStream Services.

The Indiana Chamber of Commerce and Wellness Council of Indiana are promoting the COVID Stops Here campaign as a way to celebrate workplaces that are leading the fight to stop COVID-19 – and to encourage more organizations to join their ranks.

"It's become clear that the COVID-19 vaccine is Indiana's best pathway to recovery," said Indiana Chamber President and CEO Kevin Brinegar. "Employers have an essential role to play and we're pleased to recognize those organizations making it a priority for the betterment of all."

Learn more about the COVID Stops Here campaign at indianachamber.com/stopcovid.

Singles Interaction, Inc.

Posted December 15, 2021, 2021

Supplied Newsletter: Singles Interaction January 2022

If you are 21 years of age or better and single, divorced, widow or widower, Singles' Interaction invites you to join them on Friday nights. Come to the Eagles Lodge, 75 South 12th Street, Richmond (membership not required) and meet other single people in the Richmond area.

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