News Releases

A Story Tracing the Rise of Madam C.J. Walker, Told by Award-Winning Storyteller Deborah Asante

Posted October 11, 2021

Supplied Graphic:  Madam C.J. Walker's Story

Morrisson-Reeves Library presents a storytelling performance by award-winning storyteller and actress, Deborah Asante on Thursday, October, 21st at 6:00 pm. The art of storytelling brings the iconic Madam C.J. Walker to life in a historical portrayal of the successful business woman.

A rags-to-riches saga like no other, full of challenges and triumphs, the Madam C.J. Walker's story is an inspiration. Facing poverty and tragedy from a very young age, Sarah Breedlove beats the odds and becomes the first woman in America to be a self-made millionaire. Storyteller Deborah Asante guides our exploration of the girl, the wife, the mother, the mogul, all parts of the woman known as Madam Walker.

Madam C.J. Walker (1867-1919) was lauded as "the first Black woman millionaire in America" for her successful line of hair-care products. Born Sarah Breedlove in Louisiana, she was widowed by age 20 and took work as a laundress. After seeking treatment for hair loss, she developed "The Walker System" and sold her homemade products directly to Black women. Talented in the art of self-promotion, she built a booming national enterprise. In 1910, she moved her headquarters to Indianapolis, where the company eventually trained 20,000 workers, mostly door-to-door saleswomen. Madam Walker also funded scholarships for women and donated large sums to the NAACP, the Black YMCA and dozens of other charities.

This performance was commissioned by the Indiana Historical Society and Storytelling Arts of Indiana.

Registration is required to attend this event. Register by calling the library at 765-966-8291 or online at MRLinfo.org/events

This library's event will have a limit on the number of participants and will follow all current Covid protocols (contact MRL for the most current procedures).

About Deborah Asante

Deborah Asante is an actress, writer, director and storyteller. She has worked for Arts for Learning for over a decade and been an accomplished performer for even more. She has received numerous awards, including the Aesop Cup for Tall Tales and the Zora Neale Hurston Award from the National Association of Black Storytellers. The Arts Council of Indianapolis has honored her twice as a Creative Renewal Arts Fellow. Asante is also the founder and artistic director of the Asante Arts Institute. She has dedicated her life to teaching and sharing the value of culture and heritage through the performing arts.

Facebook Event Listing: https://www.facebook.com/events/982019299043606

Photos courtesy of: https://storytellingarts.org/event/sarah-the-dreambuilder-a-story-tracing-the-rise-of- madam-cj-walker-told-by-deborah-asante-3/?instance_id=874

Free Concert with Kelly Zullo

Posted October 11, 2021

Supplied Photo:  Kelly Zullo

The Friends of Morrisson-Reeves Library presents a free musical performance by guitarist Kelly Zullo on Friday, October, 15th at 5:30 pm. The doors open at 5:00 pm and music starts at 5:30 pm. Zullo, who won the Columbus, Ohio Songwriter Association competition's "best songwriter" category, fuses funk, jazz and Americana, and will perform in the Library's Historic Courtyard as weather permits. If it's rainy, the concert will be moved indoors at the library.

"Americana Transcendentalist" Kelly Zullo writes songs reflecting the likes of Emerson with an adoration of the writing style of Patty Griffin. Known in the guitar community for her fast "finger slamming" style, Kelly has fused that element with her inspirational songwriting and vocals. Zullo is described as a one-person band.

In her hometown of Columbus, Ohio, she was voted 614 Magazine's "Best Solo Musician" for 2014/15 and most recently was reviewed by Guitar World Magazine, describing her latest release as "An energetic acoustic guitar assault by this skilled, funky speed demon." Kelly also appeared in the 2014 show, "Woodchopper's Ball" at Kent Stage in Columbus, Ohio which features 9 of the top acoustic guitarists from around the country. For more information on Zullo's music, see kellyzullo.com/

This concert is coordinated by local music enthusiast Joe Augustin who helps introduce cherished musicians to our local community.

The library will have a limit on the number of participants and will follow all current Covid protocols (contact MRL for the most current procedures). Face Coverings over the nose and mouth are required while inside the library. For outdoor events, face coverings and social distancing are recommended for attendees.

Grab Bag Book Sale to be Held October 16th

Posted October 11, 2021

Supplied Graphic:  MRL Book SaleThe Friends of Morrisson-Reeves Library have a fun event planned for all avid readers in our community! The Grab Bag Book Sale is offered Saturday, October 16th from 10:00 am – 1:00 pm. Shop from the convenience of your car. Volunteers will be on hand to take your order and delivery the books to your trunk.

Drive-thru the library's parking lot and purchase $5 Grab Bags of books. Look for the orange tent for the pick-up location.

Grab Bags will be prefilled with a selection of gently used, popular books that have been donated to the library. This is not a typical browser's delight Book Sale where shoppers can select books of their choice. Each prefilled bag is sealed after it is packed by volunteers.

Book categories available at this sale are fiction, cookbooks, youth, picture books, mysteries, romance, science fiction and suspense. Cash or check accepted.

A Few Key Reminders About COVID-19 Testing and What Should Happen After the Test

Posted October 7, 2021

With COVID-19 case counts still high, it's a good time to review what should happen when someone tests positive for the virus, especially considering some of the guidance from federal health officials has changed since the pandemic's early days thanks to the presence of vaccines.

I tested negative

A negative result likely means you don't have COVID-19, or at least you didn't at the time your sample was collected. You should consult your school/workplace policies to find out whether you can return to your normal schedule.

I tested positive

All those who test positive for COVID-19 -- whether fully vaccinated or not -- should isolate from others for at least 10 days from either their first day of symptoms or the day of their positive test, whichever was earlier.

The Indiana Department of Health's page on contact tracing says you can spread COVID-19 two days before you begin to have symptoms. Once you test positive, you should reach out to anyone you've been in close contact with so they can begin their quarantine. Close contact is defined as being within 6 feet for a total of 15 minutes or more over a 24-hour period.

If you don't have symptoms, you should reach out to any close contacts from the 48 hours before you were tested. If you do have symptoms, it's the 48 hours before you developed those symptoms.

I've been exposed to someone who tested positive

Anyone who is not fully vaccinated who has been in close contact with someone who has COVID-19 should quarantine for 14 days.

Those who are fully vaccinated -- anyone who has received both doses of a two-dose vaccine such as Pfizer or Moderna or the single-dose Johnson & Johnson vaccine -- do not need to quarantine after exposure unless the vaccinated person is symptomatic.

Fully vaccinated people should get tested 3-5 days after their exposure even if they don't have symptoms and wear a mask in public for 14 days after exposure or until they get a negative test result.

What should I be on the lookout for now that I've tested positive?

Those who have complications typically see them in the second week or about eight days after the onset of symptoms. Watch for worsening symptoms and don't delay contacting your primary care provider should they appear.

According to the CDC, if you have trouble breathing, persistent pain or pressure in your chest, new confusion, an inability to wake up or stay awake, or pale, gray, or blue-colored skin, lips, or nail beds, seek emergency medical care immediately. Call 911 or go to the nearest Emergency Room.

If you need to schedule a COVID-19 test or are looking for your results, call Reid Health's COVID hotline at (765) 965-4200. The hotline is available 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. seven days a week to help with testing and those who need clinical advice.

Today's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 48
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 38 (79.2%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 9
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 9 (100%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 5
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 5 (100%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 339
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 32 (9.4% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 14

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Foundation Announces Finalists for 2022 Lilly Endowment Community Scholarship

Posted October 11, 2021

The Wayne County Foundation is pleased to announce that among a pool of 79 highly competitive applicants, five high school seniors who attend Wayne County schools have been selected as finalists for the 2022 Lilly Endowment Community Scholarship.

  • Emily Cox, Lincoln High School
  • Esther Etherington, Richmond High School
  • Devin Frazier, Centerville High School
  • Shayna Morris, Lincoln High School
  • Garrett Walther, Centerville High School

From the five finalists, two will be awarded the scholarship. The applications were thoroughly reviewed and independently scored by members of the Foundation's selection committee. In selecting the finalists, consideration was given for a student's activities, achievements, community service, academic performance, financial need, work experience, and leadership potential.

Finalists will be interviewed in October and interview scores will determine the finalists' rankings. The committee's recommendations will be submitted to Independent Colleges of Indiana, Inc. for final review of the scholarship recipients. The 2022 Lilly Endowment Community Scholars for Wayne County will be announced in December 2021.

Lilly Endowment Community Scholars are awarded a four-year, full-tuition scholarship to pursue baccalaureate degrees at colleges or universities in the state Indiana. The scholarship also includes up to $900 annually for required textbooks and equipment. To date, more than 50 Wayne County students have been awarded the scholarship since the program began in 1998.

For more information on the Lilly Endowment Community Scholarship or other scholarships administered by Wayne County Foundation, visit https://waynecountyfoundation.org/ or contact Alex Painter, Community Engagement Officer, at 765-962-1638.

Senior Adult Ministry October Meeting

Posted October 11, 2021

Do you have questions about Hospice Care? Then attend the next meeting of the Senior Adult Ministry which will be held at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, October 26, at First United Methodist Church, 318 National Road West, Richmond, IN.

Bring snacks to share and invite a friend for a presentation by Valerie King from Premier Hospice Health Care.

Senior Adult Ministry is an active group of seniors over 50 years old open to all regardless of religious affiliation. The group is guided by Pastor Judi Marshall, Clara Bulmer and Beverly Kirby. These three women actively share their gifts of ministry, hospitality and creativity in planning and organizing the monthly meetings.

For further information, call 765-962-4357.

Applications are Open for Next Generation Hoosier Educators Scholarship

Posted October 11, 2021

Students have until January 31, 2022 to apply for renewable $7,500 scholarship

(INDIANAPOLIS) – High-achieving high school and college students who are planning to teach in the State of Indiana for at least five years can apply for a $7,500 scholarship per year of college (up to $30,000 total) through the Next Generation Hoosier Educators Scholarship program.

The Indiana Commission for Higher Education is encouraging students to act quickly, as there are only 200 scholarships available and the deadline to apply is January 31, 2022. Interested students should apply at ScholarTrack.IN.gov.

"Everyone has a story about a great teacher who changed their lives for the better. We need more of these change agents in Indiana's classrooms," said Dr. Katie Jenner, Indiana Secretary of Education. "The Next Generation Hoosier Educators Scholarship is elevating the importance of this lifelong impact with a meaningful scholarship to help support Indiana's best and brightest as they pursue a career in education."

This scholarship is making a difference at building Indiana's teacher pipeline. Nearly 90 percent of scholarship recipients from the inaugural 2017 cohort are either continuing their education or have already become licensed teachers actively making an impact for Hoosier students.

To qualify for the scholarship, students must have either graduated in the top 20 percent of their high school class or earned a score in the top 20th percentile on the SAT (1190) or ACT (26). To continue earning the scholarship in college, students must file a Free Application for Federal Student Aid each year, earn a 3.0 cumulative GPA and complete at least 30 credit hours per year. Current college students who apply must be able to use the scholarship for at least two full academic years.

"The Next Generation Hoosier Educators Scholarship not only assists future educators in funding their higher education, but it helps keep those who become licensed teaching in Indiana," said Indiana Commissioner for Higher Education Teresa Lubbers. "We look forward to the positive impact these educators will have on their students and on Indiana's teacher pipeline."

The Commission will review all applications and notify applicants of their scholarship status via email by March 18, 2022.Supplied Photo:  Maylee Barriger

A total of 438 students applied for the 2021-22 Next Generation Hoosier Educators Scholarship, with applications from 229 high schools in 84 of Indiana's 92 counties. Nearly three-quarters of applicants were Indiana high school seniors with the remainder comprised of current college students.

Maylee Barriger, a recent graduate from Hauser Jr.-Sr. High School in Hope, Indiana, is one of the 2020-21 scholarship recipients. Barriger is currently attending Indiana University-Purdue University Columbus where she's pursuing a major in elementary education with an endorsement for middle school math. Upon graduation, she wants to teach at either her former Jr.-Sr. high school or Hope Elementary.

"I was super nervous to go to college because I was not sure I could afford it," said Barriger. "I'm really thankful for this scholarship because it's given me the opportunity to stay at home and be close to my family, work to save money and be involved in my community in new ways I was not able to in high school."

Visit www.LearnMoreIndiana.org/NextTeacher for more information on how to apply and follow #NextTeacher on social media. Questions may be directed to NextTeacher@che.in.gov.

For questions about state financial aid, students can contact the Indiana Commission for Higher Education by phone at 888-528-4719 or via email at awards@che.in.gov.

Humanity in Medicine Honor 'Long Overdue' for 2021 Winner

Posted October 4, 2021

Supplied Photo: Dr. Rohit BawaWhen Daniel Wegg heard Rohit Bawa wasn't on the list of previous winners of the Paul S. Rhoads Humanity in Medicine Award, he was shocked.

"When I look over the list of the people who have had the award, the most surprising thing is that Dr. Bawa's name wasn't on it 10 years ago," said Wegg, M.D., Family Medicine. "I couldn't believe it when somebody said he'd never had the award. I thought to myself surely he's been recognized time and again."

Dr. Wegg wasn't alone in thinking Bawa, M.D., Otolaryngology, had to have been honored with the award already.

"You wonder, 'How did he slide under the radar for so long?' He's been a steady, constant, consistent, loyal performer who cares about Reid, cares about the community, cares about his patients, cares about the medical staff," said Craig Kinyon, Reid Health President/CEO.

"I would say he's deserving of this on so many levels. It's hard to even describe which one stands out the most."

Dr. Bawa officially was added to the list of winners Friday evening, becoming the 41st recipient of the award named after its first honoree, the late Paul S. Rhoades, M.D., in 1983.

"I think this is long overdue, and 100 percent well-deserved," Dr. Wegg said.

Dr. Bawa's selection for the award was announced at an annual medical staff appreciation and new physician reception in Richmond. Nominations were solicited from patients, physicians, and healthcare workers.

Authorized as an annual event by Reid's governing board in 1983, the Humanity in Medicine Award honors the memory of Dr. Rhoads for his service to patients and medicine. He was the founding director of Reid's Medical Education Department and helped organize the hospice program and the Wayne County adult clinic for the indigent.

"I feel very proud. I follow in a long line of distinguished physicians - some I've known for a long time," Dr. Bawa said. "It humbles me to be included in that list. I never thought I would get this award.

"The honor is not just for me. It's for the entire team. It's my clinical team, my medical assistants, the nurses, the people I work with in the operating room, my colleagues, the nurses in the hospital. Everybody works together. I'm just one representative of the entire team that takes care of the patients."

"You wonder, 'How did he slide under the radar for so long?' He's been a steady, constant, consistent, loyal performer who cares about Reid, cares about the community, cares about his patients, cares about the medical staff. I would say he's deserving of this on so many levels. It's hard to even describe which one stands out the most." -- Craig Kinyon, Reid Health President/CEO

Dr. Bawa's colleagues praised his work ethic, wondering how he finds time to not only care for his patients at his practice's main location in Richmond but also make time for outreach to other communities in Reid's service area. Then there's his position as chair of the Reid Health Physician Associates Network Operating Council and other various committees and leadership roles.

"I can't even count the number of committees he's on," said Kristy Carter, Physician Assistant. "In the office, he's always doing something else while he's seeing patients. We don't stand still. I always joke that he couldn't be an ortho surgeon because you have to wait for cement to dry and he couldn't stand still for 15 minutes."

"Working alongside Dr. Bawa, I'm in a constant state of awe about how he keeps juggling so many things with absolute grace and humility," said Misti Foust-Cofield, Reid Vice President/Chief Nursing Officer.

"He is truly an inspiration just to see how he manages the several different hats he wears and never loses sight of being here to serve others, whether that's patients or other medical staff members or patients' families. He has a true heart to serve other people."

A native of India, Dr. Bawa came to the United States with his family at the age of 11. He grew up in the Westchester, Ohio, area near Cincinnati. He earned his bachelor's and doctoral degrees from the University of Cincinnati and did his residency at West Virginia University Hospitals in Morgantown, W.Va.

"Working alongside Dr. Bawa, I'm in a constant state of awe about how he keeps juggling so many things with absolute grace and humility. He is truly an inspiration just to see how he manages the several different hats he wears and never loses sight of being here to serve others, whether that's patients or other medical staff members or patients' families. He has a true heart to serve other people." -- Misti Foust-Cofield, Reid Vice President/Chief Nursing Officer

Dr. Bawa came to Richmond in 1994, hired by David Jetmore, M.D., to join Jetmore's growing ENT practice.

"A lot of people don't realize how involved he has been with Reid, serving on various committees, and he's done this for years," Dr. Jetmore said. "These are things where you don't get a lot of applause when you walk into the room. A lot of the things you do go totally unrecognized.

"He's not been a person who looks for acclaim. He just toils quietly away, many times behind the scenes."

Dr. Bawa loves to travel with his fiancée, Dr. Lisa Carter. Years ago, he spotted a magazine article naming 50 places of a lifetime, and they've been steadily checking off destinations from the list.

"I think we've ticked off about 20 to 25 roughly. Our goal is to end up in all those places," he said. "I like to learn. She loves to learn. We have the same mentality about exploring and learning new things. And traveling does that for us."

The couple have five children, Raman, Rajan, and Rhea Bawa and Zachary and Gabriella Harris.

"When he commits to something, you get 100 percent of Dr. Bawa," Dr. Wegg said. "I don't know how he keeps giving up 100 percent of himself and still having anything left over, but he does. I don't know how he manufactures time like that.

"He's just everywhere. When there's major decisions to be made, when there's leadership required, he is there. He's the first person you think of, and I respect him immensely for that."

CDC Health Alert Urges Pregnant People to Get COVID-19 Vaccine

Posted October 4, 2021

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently issued a health alert urging those who are pregnant, recently pregnant, who are trying to become pregnant now, or who might become pregnant in the future to get vaccinated against COVID-19.

According to the CDC, as of Sept. 27, more than 125,000 COVID-19 cases had been reported in pregnant people, with more than 22,000 hospitalizations and 161 deaths. Some 97% of pregnant people hospitalized this year for illness or for labor and delivery who tested positive for COVID-19 were unvaccinated.

As of Sept. 18, only 31% of pregnant people were fully vaccinated before or during their pregnancy.

Pregnancy causes changes in the body that could make it easier to get very sick from respiratory viruses such as the one that causes COVID-19.

In addition to the same severe illness and death risks that all those with COVID-19 face, pregnant people who become infected have a higher likelihood for preterm birth, stillbirth, and the need for their baby to be admitted to an intensive care unit.

Meanwhile, studies have shown breastfeeding people have antibodies in their breastmilk, which could help protect their babies from infection.

In addition to the same severe illness and death risks that all those with COVID-19 face, pregnant people who become infected have a higher likelihood for preterm birth, stillbirth, and the need for their baby to be admitted to an intensive care unit.

The CDC says the COVID-19 vaccines are safe for those who are pregnant, breastfeeding, or who hope to become pregnant in the future. There is no evidence the vaccines cause infertility issues.

Along with the CDC, the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology and the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine have endorsed COVID-19 vaccination during pregnancy.

FREE vaccinations are available at a number of nearby locations. Indiana residents can find sites and sign up for an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.

Today's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 54
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 41 (75.9%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 9
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 9 (100%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 5
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 5 (100%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 652
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 120 (18.4% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 20

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

International Day of the Girl: The Importance of Supporting Young Women

Posted October 4, 2021

By: Jackie Webb, Board President, Girls Inc. of Wayne County

"I feel safe and like I belong here," said one of the girls of Girls Inc. of Wayne County. Girls Inc. becomes the promise for a better, brighter future that is quietly beating deep inside the hearts of girls throughout Wayne County. On International Day of the Girl, we not only recognize the importance of serving girls in Wayne County but all girls.

International Day of the Girl is an international observance day declared by the U.N., taking place each year on Oct. 11. The day is meant to support more opportunities for girls and increase awareness of inequality faced by girls worldwide based upon their gender. At Girls Inc. of Wayne County, we take time on International Day of the Girl to celebrate the progress we have made at our organization and recognize the work that needs to be done to improve girls' rights everywhere.

Girls Inc. of Wayne County delivers nine core programs that inspire girls to be strong, smart and bold. Our programs like Economic Literacy, Friendly PEERsuasion and Leadership & Community Action equip girls with the skills they need to be strong wherever they decide to go in the world. As Girls Inc. and our girls continue to grow, we hope that the programs will continue to inspire girls on their own journey and support other women in their endeavors.

Girls are facing similar issues whether they are in Wayne County or somewhere else in the world. It is essential that we understand the differences in each and every girl and embrace them, as they are each facing their unique set of challenges. While organizations like Girls Inc. are available to some girls, not every girl is lucky enough to have access to support depending on where they are at in the world.

Support beyond the organization is vital. Community and workforce must be an example to these girls that the values taught at Girls Inc. are demonstrated in "real life" situations. Community members, government entities and businesses need to mirror the objectives of Girls Inc. to prove that honesty, integrity, and hard work will lead to a successful and satisfying outcome.

International Day of the Girl provides us with a moment to look at how we support girls and encourage them to advocate for themselves. Girls Inc. affiliates like Wayne County have the ability to impact girls, but this influence needs to work its way into everyday situations. The values we find key on International Day of the Girl should be top of mind on a daily basis to encourage girls to reach their full potential.

For more information about Girls Inc. of Wayne County, visit https://www.girlsincwayne.org/.

Caregivers Invited to Drive-Thru Appreciation Events

Posted October 4, 2021

LifeStream Services invites caregivers to the Caregiver Drive-Thru Appreciation events in celebration of National Family Caregivers Month in November. Caregivers can drive-thru to receive helpful caregiver resources from local organizations and a sweet treat.

Registration is not required and there is no fee to attend this event. CDC guidelines will be in place to keep the events safe for the community. LifeStream will host two events in Connersville and Richmond:

  • Richmond Caregiver Drive-Thru Appreciation: Wednesday, November 3 from 11:00am to noon at The Leland Legacy located at 900 S. A St. Richmond, IN 47374.
  • Connersville Caregiver Drive-Thru Appreciation: Wednesday, November 10 from 11:00am to noon at Majestic Care of Connersville located at 1029 E. 5th St. Connersville, IN 47331.
LifeStream Services recognizes the importance of family caregivers and the sacrifices they make to keep their loved one(s) safe and healthy. This event is one way LifeStream and partners can give back to those who give so much. For more information regarding caregiver resources provided by LifeStream or the Caregiver Drive-Thru Appreciation events, please contact Angie Jenkins, Outreach Coordinator, at 765-759-1121 or ajenkins@lifestreaminc.org. More information at lifestreaminc.org.

Those Who Have Had COVID-19 Should Still Get Vaccinated

Posted October 4, 2021

Since the Delta variant-fueled surge in COVID-19 cases began in July, more than 2,500 people in Wayne County alone have tested positive for the virus.

The vast majority of those people were unvaccinated when they became infected. Across all of Indiana, only about 1.2% of the fully vaccinated have had a breakthrough case since the state's first full vaccinations in mid-January.

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), those who have recovered from COVID-19 should get vaccinated. The CDC cites evidence that suggests people get better protection from reinfection by being fully vaccinated, including one study that showed unvaccinated people who already had COVID-19 are more than two times more likely than fully vaccinated people to become infected again.

Anyone who was treated with monoclonal antibodies or convalescent plasma while sick with COVID-19 should wait 90 days before getting a vaccine.

Everyone else can get the FREE shot as soon as they've recovered from their illness and have met the criteria for discontinuing isolation, which includes 10 days after symptoms first appeared, 24 hours with no fever without the use of medication, and other COVID-19 symptoms having improved.

Those who test positive for the virus but don't have symptoms should wait to get vaccinated until 10 days have passed since their test.

People who have been exposed to someone who has tested positive for COVID-19 should wait to get vaccinated after their 14-day quarantine period has ended.

FREE vaccinations are available at a number of nearby locations. Indiana residents can find sites and sign up for an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.

Today's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 45
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 34 (75.6%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 10
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 10 (100%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 7
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 7 (100%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 276
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 18 (6.5% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 18
Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

FAFSA Opens Today For 2022-2023 School Year

Posted October 4, 2021

Hoosier students can apply for state financial aid through April 15, 2022

Hoosier students and families are encouraged to file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), which is now open for the 2022-2023 school year.

The Indiana Commission for Higher Education reminds Hoosiers that filing the FAFSA by April 15, 2022 is imperative for securing money for college and accessing some of the $390 million in state financial aid and billions of dollars in federal aid available for learners.

"Regardless of family income, filing the FAFSA is an important first step for anyone interested in education and training beyond high school," said Indiana Commissioner for Higher Education Teresa Lubbers. "It's surprising how much money is left on the table each year because many Hoosiers assume they don't qualify for state or federal financial aid. There is a significant amount of funding available to help with the cost of college, but you must at least have a FAFSA on file to use it."

Filing the FAFSA is required for many of Indiana's scholarship and grant opportunities, such as the Frank O'Bannon Grant and the Next Level Jobs Workforce Ready Grant, and many colleges require a completed FAFSA to award merit and need-based scholarships. Regardless of the degree being pursued – including short-term certificates, associate and bachelor's degrees and higher – students should file the FAFSA to potentially qualify for available financial aid.

Currently, there are nearly 15,000 high school seniors who qualify for Indiana's early-college promise program, the 21st Century Scholars program. Completing the FAFSA on time is a necessary step for Scholars to earn the full scholarship amount of up to four years of college tuition.

How to file the FAFSA

Students can file the FAFSA online at FAFSA.gov. The first step for students who have not previously filed the FAFSA is to create a Federal Student Aid (FSA) ID. Then, each student will need:

  • Social Security number
  • Alien Registration number (for non-U.S. citizens)
  • Federal income tax returns, W-2s and other records of money earned from 2020
  • Bank statements and records of investments (if applicable)
  • Records of untaxed income (if applicable)

Improvements to simplify and shorten the FAFSA are coming for the 2023-24 academic year, however this year filers will notice a new look to the form, making it easier to navigate and get assistance. The U.S. Department of Education provides email and live chat assistance for FAFSA filers as well as a helpline at 800-4FED-AID. Hoosier families can also access free FAFSA help through INvestEd Indiana at www.investedindiana.org.

Posted October 4, 2021

NATCO Credit Union Selected as the First Place State Level Recipient for the Dora Maxwell Social Responsibility Community Service Award

Posted October 4, 2021

Supplied Photo:  NATCO Employees with AwardIndiana Credit Union League announced that Natco Credit Union was selected as the first-place winner of the Dora Maxwell Social Responsibility Community Service Award for Indiana in the asset size of $50 million to $250 million.

Dora Maxwell was a credit union pioneer who worked with numerous organizations to improve the living standards of the poor and needy. Many years ago, the Dora Maxwell Social Responsibility Recognition Program was established to encourage involvement in community projects and activities.

Each year, credit unions across Indiana have the opportunity to compete with other credit unions in their asset category for the Dora Maxwell award. This year, we submitted an entry based on our Volunteer Individual Tax Assistance (VITA) program offered through Natco Community Empowerment Center (NCEC). The two-person staff of NCEC found innovative and transformative ways to provide safe alternative methods for collecting tax information and providing finalized returns. During the most recent tax season, they prepared and submitted a total of 1158 returns totaling $1.5 million in Federal refunds and $185,000 in State refunds. By offering this free service, individuals and families saved nearly half a million dollars ($497,940) in fees*. When spent locally, businesses in our area and our economy were stimulated.

On September 10th, Natco Credit Union was recognized as the first-place state winner in the $50 - $250 million asset category. Cindy Duke, CEO, Sherry Dillon, Director of Administration and Innovation and Doug Macias, Community Development Officer accepted the award during the Indiana Credit Union League Convention. As the first-place winner, our entry was forwarded to CUNA (Credit Union National Association) for the national competition.

Natco Credit Union is a community based, not-for-profit credit union committed to providing an alternative to other financial institutions. In our commitment to people helping people, Natco Credit Union's mission is helping people live better lives.

Natco Credit Union currently serves over 16,000 members and is over $133 million in assets. Our services are available to any industrial workers or family member within a 25 mile radius of Richmond, IN and anyone who lives or works in the following Indiana counties – Wayne, Fayette, Randolph, Henry, Rush, Union, and Franklin. Membership is also available to any family member of an existing member.

Hunters Can Donate Deer to Help Feed Hungry Hoosiers

Posted September 30, 2021

Conservation Officers encourage Indiana hunters to donate harvested deer to help feed hungry Hoosiers.

The Sportsmen's Benevolence Fund administered by the DNR Division of Law Enforcement provides grants to Hoosiers Feeding the Hungry, the Dubois County Sportsmen Club, and Hunters and Farmers Feeding the Hungry to pay for processing fees when hunters donate legally harvested deer.

Participating in the program is simple:

Enjoy a deer hunting experience.

  • Harvest a deer.
  • Drop off the field-dressed deer at a local participating processor.
  • Processing fees are paid for by the Sportsmen's Benevolence Fund.
  • The processor will create healthy venison burger to distribute to food banks.

The participating organizations notify food banks throughout Indiana when venison is ready to be collected from certified Sportsmen's Benevolence Fund butchers. The food banks distribute venison to soup kitchens and food pantries.

As a result of the 2020 deer hunting seasons, the Sportsmen's Benevolence Fund provided funding to process more than 360 harvested deer that resulted in more than 20,650 pounds of venison being donated.

For information on donating your harvested deer and participating processors, please visit sbf.IN.gov.

Booster Shots vs. Third Doses: What's the Difference

Posted September 30, 2021

In recent weeks, federal health officials have approved extra doses of some COVID-19 vaccines for certain groups of people. Either "booster shot" or "third dose" are used to describe the extra jabs, and although the terms sound like they can be used interchangeably, they actually have very different official meanings.

To help clear up some of the confusion, here's a breakdown of what each term means, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Booster shot

Who's it for? Pfizer vaccine recipients who are 65 years and older or are 18 years and older and have underlying medical conditions such as cancer; chronic kidney, liver, lung, or heart conditions; diabetes; pregnancy; obesity; and HIV, or are 18 and older and work or live in high-risk settings such as first responders (healthcare workers, firefighters, police), long-term care, education, food and agriculture, manufacturing, prisons and jails, public transit, U.S Postal Service, and grocery stores.

Which vaccine is approved for it? Only Pfizer. The CDC says it expects booster doses will be approved at some point for both the Moderna and Johnson & Johnson vaccines as well, but more data is needed first.

If you're eligible, when should you get it? At least six months after your second dose.

Third dose

Who's it for? Pfizer and Moderna vaccine recipients who are moderately to severely immunocompromised, which can include those who have been receiving active cancer treatment for tumors or cancers of the blood, received an organ transplant and are taking medication to suppress the immune system, received a stem cell transplant within the past two years or are taking medication to suppress the immune system, moderate or severe primary immunodeficiency (such as DiGeorge syndrome or Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome), advanced or untreated HIV infection, and active treatment with high-dose corticosteroids or other drugs that might suppress the immune system. Talk with your healthcare provider about your particular medical condition and whether the additional dose is appropriate for you.

Which vaccines are approved for it? Both of the vaccines that use mRNA technology, which means Pfizer and Moderna.

The third dose should be of the same vaccine that was received the first two times, but if the same one isn't available, the CDC says the other can be used.

If you're eligible, when should you get it? At least 28 days after your second dose.

FREE vaccinations are available at a number of nearby locations. Indiana residents can find sites and sign up for an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.

Today's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 45
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 34 (75.6%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 8
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 8 (100%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 7
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 7 (100%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 371
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 69 (18.6% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 19

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Reid Hearing Center Takes Center Stage at Medical Monday

Posted September 30, 2021

Supplied Photo:  Stacy BordenIf you find yourself having a little trouble hearing these days, you'll want to check out October's Medical Monday event.

Reid Health audiologist Stacy Borden will discuss the services offered by the Reid Hearing Center during her presentation titled "Can You Hear Me Now?".

The free presentation will begin at 1 p.m. Monday, Oct. 11 at Central United Methodist Church, 1425 E. Main St. in Richmond.

To register for the event, call Sharrie Harlin Davis at (765) 983-3000, ext. 4676. Masks are required to attend.

Medical Monday is supported by Reid Health Community Benefit. Harlin Davis started the event when she was working for the Minority Health Coalition and maintained it after joining Reid Health. The event has built a loyal following, averaging 40 to 50 guests each month to learn about various health issues and community programs.

It's in the Name: ClaimAid Plays Vital Role in Helping Neighborhood Health Center Patients

Posted September 30, 2021

Neighborhood Health Center's (NHC) partner to help patients with financial challenges to getting care is an appropriately named organization for the job – ClaimAid does exactly what the name implies.

"ClaimAid specializes in helping patients find programs to help cover their medical expenses," said Carrie Miles, CEO of NHC. "This program and our advocate are a great resource for patients to assist with completing confusing forms or respond to any mailing information they may receive."

Richinda Banks, Revenue Cycle Supervisor for NHC, said NHC has a ClaimAid advocate, Kristin Harris is available Monday through Fridays to help patients. The advocate is in Richmond's location Mondays and Fridays and in Liberty Tuesdays through Thursdays. Harris can help patients find insurance options based on income and household size, apply for NHC's sliding fee discount program, find medication assistance and set up affordable payment plans.

Patients can meet with an advocate in private office space so they can be more comfortable discussing financial need, she said. "We encourage all new patients without insurance coverage to meet with our ClaimAid advocate before establishing care at NHC because she can assist our patients quickly to determine what help they may be able to receive."

Patients who have a single source of coverage or who have had changes in their income may find they qualify for additional assistance – and ClaimAid can help them find out. "The advocate can help the patient make the best decision based on their personal and unique needs," Miles said. "In 2020, NHC was able to help 450 patients obtain Medicaid coverage. We are on pace to meet and possibly exceed that number in 2021. This is life changing coverage for patients."

Banks said patients who don't think they qualify for Medicaid or sliding fee discounts find they do after working with ClaimAid. "This lessens the burden and reduces barriers for accessing healthcare services."

NHC also provides on-site Spanish interpretation to help with forms and conversations.

Neighborhood Health Centers offer quality primary care and mental health services to people at its Richmond and Union County locations.

To schedule an appointment with ClaimAid at NHC, simply call 965-4299 or 458-5191 or stop in during normal business hours at one of our offices: 101 South 10th, Richmond; or 950 N. Market Street, Liberty.

Mindful Explorations Presents Award-Winning Author, Social Justice Scholar Monique W. Morris to Discuss Empowering Black Girls

Posted September 29, 2021

An award-winning author and social justice scholar is the featured presenter in this year's first Mindful Explorations event at Indiana University East.

Supplied Photo:  Monique Morris
Monique W. Morris, Ed.D., an award-winning author and social justice scholar with three decades of experience in the areas of education, civil rights, juvenile and criminal justice, will virtually present during IU East's Mindful Explorations event on October 6.

Monique W. Morris, Ed.D., will virtually present "Empowering Black Girls in Schools and Society" at 5:15 p.m. on Wednesday, October 6, on IU East Facebook Live at https://www.facebook.com/events/285833289753954. The presentation will begin with a panel discussion led by IU East faculty, and Morris' presentation will begin at 6 p.m.

The presentation is free and open to the public.

Morris has 30 years of experience in education, civil rights, and juvenile and criminal justice. She is the president/CEO of Grantmakers for Girls of Color, a philanthropic collaborative that supports a world where all girls and young women of color can thrive.

She is the executive producer and co-writer of the documentary film, Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools, which will be available for participants to view ahead of the event. The film is based on two of her books - Sing A Rhythm, Dance A Blues: Education for Liberation of Black and Brown Girls and Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools.

For the Mindful Explorations discussion, Morris will expand on themes in the documentary and the continuing urgency of understanding and responding to the experiences of Black girls in schools and social institutions.

The event is sponsored by the IU East School of Education, the Office of Diversity and Inclusion, the School of Nursing and Health Sciences, the School of Business and Economics, the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, and Mindful Explorations, courtesy of the William H. and Jean R. Reller Endowment.

Morris is a prolific writer about social justice issues and has lectured widely on research, policies and practices associated with improving juvenile/criminal justice, educational, and socioeconomic conditions for girls and women of color. She is the Founder of the National Black Women's Justice Institute (NBWJI), which works to interrupt school-to-confinement pathways for girls and reduce barriers to employment for formerly incarcerated women, and increase the capacity of organizations working to reduce sexual assault and domestic violence in African American communities.

Josh Tolbert, associate professor of education, said he was inspired by Morris' books, which eventually led to the plan to bring her to IU East for Mindful Explorations.

"I read Pushout in 2016 and it was really powerful. I had already been teaching for quite some time, and what Dr. Morris wrote made me reevaluate my own past practice and completely reshaped the way I thought about the future," Tolbert said.

Tolbert added the documentary and the virtual event will be beneficial to anyone, not just those in education.

"Her work focuses on the experience of black girls and black women in society. It is so relevant to everything - nursing, business, criminal justice, women's and gender studies, to name a few," Tolbert said.

Morris also excels not only in presenting the existing problems, but also on developing programs and solutions to respond appropriately," Tolbert said. "Her work has a universal quality to it."

He trusts the presentation and discussion will "raise awareness and create a desire in people to keep working for equity in our communities."

To view the documentary ahead of the event, individuals with an IU login can access it through the Campus Library at https://purl.dlib.indiana.edu/iudl/media/q27z60kj19. Community members without an IU login are encouraged to contact the Campus Library at liblearn@iue.edu for access to the documentary.

Morris has an extensive background.

She is also the author of Black Stats: African Americans by the Numbers in the Twenty-First Century (The New Press, 2014), Too Beautiful for Words (MWM Books, 2012), and she worked with Kemba Smith on her book, Poster Child: The Kemba Smith Story (IBJ Book Publishing, 2011). Morris has written dozens of articles, book chapters, and other publications on social justice issues and lectured widely on research, policies, and practices associated with improving juvenile/criminal justice, educational, and socioeconomic conditions for girls and women of color.

Her 2018 TED Talk on how to stop the criminalization of Black girls in schools has received more than 1.8 million views and been translated into 18 languages.

Morris served as an adjunct associate professor for Saint Mary's College of California between 2013-2018 and has taught at the University of San Francisco and California State University, Sacramento. She is a 2012 Soros Justice Fellow, the former vice president for Economic Programs, Advocacy and Research at the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and the former director of research for the Thelton E. Henderson Center for Social Justice at the UC Berkeley Law School.

She has worked in partnership with and served as a consultant for federal, state and county agencies, national academic and research institutions, and communities throughout the nation to develop research, comprehensive approaches and training curricula to eliminate racial/ethnic and gender disparities in justice and educational systems. Her work in this area has informed the development and implementation of improved culturally competent and gender-responsive continua of services for youth.

Her work has been profiled by MSNBC, CSPAN2, The Washington Post, The New York Times, NPR, and PBS, among other national and local print, radio, and television media. Morris' research intersects race, gender, education and justice to explore the ways in which Black communities, and other communities of color, are uniquely affected by social policies. She also frequently lectures on the life and legacy of the artist Prince.

Boys & Girls Club of Wayne County Names New CEO

Posted September 29, 2021

The Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County has named Alicia Painter as their new Chief Executive Officer (CEO). Mrs. Painter becomes only the fourth leader and first female leader of the organization in its 64-year history. Alicia will follow long-time Executive Director Bruce Daggy as he retires in December 2021 after a long 29-year career with the Club. Alicia will take over starting in January 2022.

Supplied Photo:  Alicia Painter
Supplied Photo: Alicia Painter

The Executive Committee and Search Committee stated, "This was a long process and we had over 100 candidates that we screened. We believe Alicia will make a great CEO for our organization and lead us into the next decade of youth development and after school programming for the youth in Wayne County."

Alicia is a graduate of Earlham College where she was a Bonner Scholar. She has been with the Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County for 10 years serving in several roles including a Camp Director, Program Director, Unit Director, Sr. Unit Director and currently the Director of Operations. She has also served on the United Way Vision Council for Juvenile Delinquency and on the Lemonade Day Board. Alicia stated that she believes in the mission of the Boys & Girls Club and is eager to serve in this new role. Alicia lives in Richmond with her husband Alex and their three children.

The Executive Committee also named Jennifer Feaster as the new Chief Financial Officer (CFO) starting in January. Jennifer has been with the Club for 19 years as their Director of Financial Administration. Both Mrs. Painter and Mrs. Feaster have been a part of the Executive Team of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County overseeing all operations and administration aspects of the Club. They are excited about the opportunity to continue to work as a team with the Board of Directors to make the Boys & Girls Club the leader in youth development programs and addressing the needs of our young people.

The mission of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County is to enable all young people, especially those who need us most, to reach their full potential as productive, caring, and responsible citizens. Members of the Club, ages 6-18, have access to dedicated, trained professionals who provide guidance in adopting healthy lifestyles and pursuing educational objectives. Currently, the Club serves over 3,000 youth at five locations: the Jeffers, McDaniel, First Bank, Western Wayne, and Hagerstown units and during the summer at our 168-acre Camp Guy located on the Whitewater River. Since 1957, the Club has been striving to equip young people with the skills they need to succeed in life. For more information, visit www.bgcrichmond.org.

Call for Entries! 123rd Annual RAM Exhibition

Posted September 29, 2021

Supplied Graphic:  RAM's 123rd ExhibitionFor more than a century, artist have exhibited their artwork at the Richmond Art Museum.

Today, this juried art show gives artists who are currently living in Indiana or Ohio the chance to exhibit their work at the Richmond Art Museum.

Thanks to RAM's generous sponsors and art afficionados, approximately $20,000 in prizes & purchase awards are handed out. Each year, pieces are selected for inclusion in the Annual Exhibition by a juror.

Important Dates:

  • October 1st: Postmark Deadline for Entry
    (Entry Fee includes up to two (2) artworks)
  • October 7, 8 & 9th 9 am - 4 pm: Works delivered to RAM
  • October 28, 29, & 30th: 10 am - 5 pm: Pick-up unaccepted works
  • November 4th, 7 pm: Virtual Awards Ceremony
    (Show will be open to the public after November 4th, however the awards ceremony will be virtual.)
  • January 8th: Exhibition Closes
  • January 13, 14 & 15th, 10 am - 5 pm: Pick-up all artwork

Download the 2021 Prospectus and Entry Form Here!

Richmond Shakespeare Festival in Richmond, Indiana presents
BECOMING OTHELLO: A Black Girl's Journey

Posted September 29, 2021

Written & Performed by Debra Ann Byrd, (Founding Artistic Director of New York's Harlem Shakespeare Festival)

Supplied Photo:  Debra Ann Byrd in Becoming Othello: A Black Girl's JourneyBECOMING OTHELLO is a personal, poignant and powerful story of perseverance, tragedy, triumph—and ultimately unconditional love. A victory story of making it against all odds. Through rhyme, meter, moving multimedia images, lyrical language, and soulful songs, this choreo-poem chronicles the life of classical actress, Debra Ann Byrd; her trials and triumphs with race and the classics; and her gender-flipped journey on the road to becoming Shakespeare's noble flawed general Othello.

DETAILS
  • When: Friday, October 15th & Saturday, October 16th, 2021
  • Where: Reid Memorial Presbyterian Church, 1004 N A St, Richmond, IN 47374
  • Time: 7:30 PM Both Nights
  • Tickets: $12 Adults/$6 Students
  • Bonus: After each performance there is a talkback with the artist!

Social distancing and masks are required for this performance. Vaccinations are strongly recommended.

For tickets go to www.richmondshakes.org and click on the Becoming Othello link.

New COVID-19 Vaccination Location Opens Thursday

Posted September 29, 2021

Reid Health's new COVID-19 vaccination clinic on Richmond's west side will open for its first day Thursday.

The new site located at Reid Plaza sits one door down from Reid's PACE Center, 2300 National Road W., but is a separate operation. PACE Center staff cannot schedule appointments for the vaccination clinic or administer the vaccine.

The vaccination clinic replaces the one that Reid has operated at the Kuhlman Center on the Wayne County Fairgrounds since mid-January. Operating hours at the new location will remain 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Thursday, noon-4 p.m. Friday, and 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday.

Appointments are preferred, but walk-ins are available. Indiana residents should go to ourshot.in.gov to schedule their free vaccinations at any Reid site or other locations such as county health departments and area pharmacies.

The state of Indiana has designated 211 as the number to call if you need help in scheduling an appointment.

Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov to see a list of their available locations and make an appointment.

The new site located at Reid Plaza sits one door down from Reid's PACE Center, 2300 National Road W., but is a separate operation. PACE Center staff cannot schedule appointments for the vaccination clinic or administer the vaccine.

Reid's other recent vaccination site addition continues to be popular. The clinic on the main concourse of Reid Health Hospital has administered some 462 vaccines since it opened Sept. 13. That includes record highs in the past two days of nearly 100 doses given a day.

Located next to the Home Medical Equipment store, the vaccine site at the hospital is open 6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Walk-ins are welcome, but appointments can be made through the state website.

The Reid Plaza clinic uses the Pfizer vaccine, which anyone 12 years and older can receive. Parents or legal guardians of minor children who will be vaccinated need to be present at the time of vaccination.

Both the one-dose Johnson & Johnson and the two-dose Pfizer vaccines are available at the hospital main concourse site. Only those 18 and older can receive the Johnson & Johnson vaccine.

Today's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 45
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 35 (77.8%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 9
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 8 (88.9%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 8
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 8 (100%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 427
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 55 (12.9% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 15

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Booster Shots Available at All Reid COVID-19 Vaccination Sites

Posted September 29, 2021

If you are among those newly eligible for a booster dose of Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine, you can sign up now for an appointment to get the extra shot at Reid Health's vaccination locations.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently approved booster shots for some groups of people who received the Pfizer vaccine at least six months ago.

Those eligible for a booster dose include:

  • Anyone 65 years and older
  • Those 18 years and older who have underlying medical conditions such as cancer; chronic kidney, liver, lung, or heart conditions; diabetes; pregnancy; obesity; HIV; and more
  • Those 18 and older who work in high-risk settings such as first responders (healthcare workers, firefighters, police), long-term care, education, food and agriculture, manufacturing, prisons and jails, public transit, U.S Postal Service, and grocery stores
  • Those 18 and older who live in high-risk settings

Studies have suggested protection against infection and mild illness given by the COVID-19 vaccine may decrease over time, although the vaccines continue to perform very well in preventing severe illness and death. Data has shown the Pfizer booster shot increases a person's immune response, helping their bodies to better prevent infection.

For now, only the Pfizer vaccine has been approved for a booster dose and only for the specific groups listed above. The CDC says others who received the Pfizer vaccine and those who received the Moderna and Johnson & Johnson vaccines will likely need a booster as well, but more data is needed first.

Before last week's booster shot news, those who are moderately to severely immunocompromised already had been given approval for an extra dose of the two-shot Pfizer or Moderna vaccine. That third dose should come at least 28 days after the second.

The CDC recommends people talk with their healthcare provider about their particular medical condition and whether an additional vaccine dose is appropriate for them.

Free vaccinations are available at a number of nearby locations. Indiana residents can find sites and sign up for an appointment by going to . Ohio residents shouourshot.in.govld use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.

For now, only the Pfizer vaccine has been approved for a booster dose and only for the specific groups listed above. The CDC says others who received the Pfizer vaccine and those who received the Moderna and Johnson & Johnson vaccines will likely need a booster as well, but more data is needed first.

Today's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 56
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 45 (80.4%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 10
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 9 (90%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 8
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 8 (100%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 359
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 37 (10.3% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 20

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

IU East's Career Services Encourages Alumni, Students to Seek Employment Through Handshake

Posted September 29, 2021

Supplied Graphic:  Handshake
IU East Office of Career Services offers Handshake to connect students and alumni to job listings and internship opportunities tailored to their degree program and career interests.
The Indiana University East Office of Career Services is ready and eager to help current students and alumni throughout their academic career and beyond.

Career Services is using a new online platform, Handshake, to connect students and alumni to potential employers. Over the past year since Handshake has been in use, the number of participants has continued to increase, and the department expects this to be a continuing trend.

Within a year, 844 students and alumni have activated their accounts with IU East Career Services.

Handshake is a free online service where students can view job listings and internship opportunities tailored to their degree program and career interests. Students may sign up for events such as career fairs and schedule appointments with Career Services through Handshake.

The senior account activation rate totaled 22.7 percent-9.7 percent above peer institutions. Profile completion between undergraduates, graduates, and alumni totaled 21 percent-15.4 percent above peer institutions.

But even with job listings at their fingertips, wading through job searches and preparing to enter the professional world can be intimidating. That's why Career Services encourages students to reach out and take advantage of their assistance.

The Office of Career Services provides students a chance to develop their professional skills through free workshops and career coaching. They also assist students with finding the right internships and employment opportunities.

One of the most important aspects to Career Services is the personal attention they devote to students.

Students are treated as individuals. It is important for students to start networking with Career Services and to let them know what sort of career path they are interested in so they can be provided with an individualized experience once something is available on Handshake.

Career Service Specialist Kara Bellew offers that individual support and dedicates her time to meeting with students and providing valuable feedback on how to develop and improve their professional skills.

Handshake was initiated on campus by Bellew and former director of Career Services, Sally Saydshoev.

IU East student-athlete Joao Vitor de Lima appreciates the personal assistance he has received from Career Services and Bellew. He is from Curitiba, Brazil. He is a senior who is majoring in finance with a minor in economics, and first reached out to Career Services at the end of his sophomore year in 2019.

"They prepared me for interviews," Lima said. He appreciates the help he received when building his resume. "Kara helped me a lot with the way I should portray my resume."

Lima said that she took the time to help him learn about ideal resume layouts and using action verbs to describe his work experience."They have been very, very helpful when it comes to getting ready for being face-to-face with a recruiter. That's how they helped me the most."

He added that the support Career Services provided was a major factor toward obtaining his remote internship with the Indiana Economic Development Corporation in Indianapolis. At his internship, Lima had the opportunity to help evaluate applications for a program that provides relief to small businesses.

Alex Hakes of Yorktown, Indiana, is a senior double-majoring in Political Science and Spanish. He is also pursuing a double minor in Economics and International Relations. Hakes reached out to Career Services during his second semester for resume advice and assistance in tracking down internship opportunities.

"Career Services has helped me gain so many professional experiences that I wouldn't have been able to find on my own," said Hakes. "Kara is amazing, and she is always looking for new opportunities to tell me about."

Hakes was able to connect with The Partnership for Public Service, a non-profit organization with a mission to "build a better government and a stronger democracy." He is currently an intern with the federal workforce team.

Both Lima and Hakes used Handshake to aid their search for internship opportunities and applauded the Office of Career Services for their use of the platform.

"Career Services helped me utilize many platforms, specifically Handshake, to find employers looking for interns," Hakes said. "With Handshake, the application process was seamless and so easy to navigate."

Lima agreed the online platform helps ease the job finding process.

"I think it's a great tool," Lima said. "It really shows that they're keeping up with technology."

IU East is no stranger to virtual innovation. With IU East's expansive online program, Career Services encourages distance education students to reach out to their department too.

Career Services finds opportunities and makes connections with online students as well.

Bellew said she has met with distance education students and successfully found remote internships and student-worker positions that fit within the students' career goals.

Career Services wants students and alumni to connect with the office, to have a conversation and to know that there is support at IU East for them to be successful.

To connect with an IU East career coach or for more information, visit iue.edu/career.

COVID-19 Vaccination Site Moving from Kuhlman Center to Reid Plaza

Posted September 29, 2021

Reid Health's main COVID-19 vaccination clinic is moving this week to another convenient location on Richmond's west side.

Since mid-January, Reid has operated a public vaccination site at the Kuhlman Center on the Wayne County Fairgrounds. Starting Thursday, that clinic will instead be run out of a space at Reid Plaza, one door down from Reid's PACE Center, 2300 National Road W.

Operating hours will remain the same with the site open 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Thursday, noon-4 p.m. Friday, and 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday.

When demand for COVID-19 vaccinations was high earlier this year, the Kuhlman Center was an ideal location for Reid's clinic. As demand decreased throughout the spring, Reid moved into a smaller office space at the building.

With last week's approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for booster shots for some vaccinated people, it's anticipated high demand will return, leading to the need once again for a larger space for the clinic.

The new site at Reid Plaza offers a bigger location without having to inconvenience any activities already planned for the Kuhlman Center in the coming weeks and months.

Starting Thursday, the vaccination clinic at the Kuhlman Center will instead be run out of a space at Reid Plaza, one door down from Reid's PACE Center, 2300 National Road W. in Richmond.

Appointments at the new location are preferred, but walk-ins are available. Indiana residents can go to ourshot.in.gov to schedule their free vaccinations at any Reid site or other locations such as county health departments and area pharmacies.

Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov to see a list of their vaccination sites and make an appointment.

The Reid Plaza site uses the Pfizer vaccine, which anyone 12 years and older can receive. Parents or legal guardians of minor children who will be vaccinated need to be present at the time of vaccination.

Today's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 59
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 48 (81.4%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 12
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 11 (91.7%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 11
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 10 (90.9%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 771
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 117 (15.2% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 16

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Reid Police Officer Graduates From Academy With 'Top Gun' Award

Posted September 29, 2021

Supplied Photo:  Reid Health President/CEO Craig Kinyon (left) issues the oath of office to new police officer Dereck Tipton during a swearing-in ceremony in July 2021.When Officer Dereck Tipton graduated from the Indiana Law Enforcement Academy on Friday, he became the first member of the Reid Health Police Department to do so while also earning an award for his skill with a firearm.

Tipton received the "Top Gun" honor for his firearms scores during academy training over the past eight weeks.

"Officers who have the skills work very hard to get this award," said Randy Kolentus, Reid's Chief of Police. "We're proud of the work Dereck has put in and his accomplishments."

Tipton was Reid's lone graduate from the academy's latest class, setting the stage for the completion of Reid's transition from a security team to a police department later this year.

Officers Cody Hahn, Cody Frame, and Troy McCauley are scheduled to begin their training at the academy next month and graduate in December.

"We're so close now to the culmination of nearly two years of work," Kolentus said.

Reid began to transform its security team to a police department early last year, joining other health systems around the state. The move is intended to enhance the security and safety of those who use Reid services.

"Officers who have the skills work very hard to get this award. We're proud of the work Dereck has put in and his accomplishments." -- Randy Kolentus, Reid Health Chief of Police

The change reflects the growth of the health system and the accompanying increase in the need for police assistance. When the intention to establish the department first was announced, Kolentus noted the Richmond Police Department responded to Reid calls almost 900 times in 2019.

The former Security Department has grown from nine officers in 2016 to more than 20 team members today as Reid's geographic footprint has increased and its number of staff has risen to some 3,400 people.

"We're grateful for everything our officers' families do so our guys can be gone for two months to attend the academy," Kolentus said. "It's not easy. We could not have made this transition without their support."

Demand Increases for Monoclonal Antibody Infusions for COVID-19 Patients

Posted September 29, 2021

The latest surge in the COVID-19 pandemic has led to increased demand for Reid Health's monoclonal antibody infusions, a treatment approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for those who are considered high risk for developing severe illness from the virus.

Monoclonal antibodies are laboratory-produced molecules that can restore, enhance, or mimic the immune system's attack on cells. They are designed to block viral attachment and entry into human cells, neutralizing the virus.

The FDA has given Emergency Use Authorization for monoclonal antibodies for use in adults and pediatric patients who are at least 12 years of age, who weigh at least 88 pounds, and who are at high risk for severe COVID-19.

Under the EUA, being high risk means meeting at least one of the following criteria:

  • Being at least 65 years old
  • Having a body mass index (BMI) of at least 35
  • Being pregnant
  • Having chronic kidney disease
  • Having diabetes
  • Having an immunosuppressive disease
  • Currently receiving an immunosuppressive treatment
  • Having cardiovascular disease or hypertension
  • Having chronic lung diseases
  • Having sickle cell disease
  • Having neurodevelopmental disorders or conditions that confer medical complexity
  • Having a medical-related technological dependence (for example, tracheostomy, gastrostomy, or positive pressure ventilation)

For those who qualify, monoclonal antibodies can be used to treat mild to moderate symptoms of COVID-19. Treatment can be provided up to 10 days after the onset of symptoms, but best results are seen when it is administered within about four days.

If you meet the criteria for a monoclonal antibody infusion, don't wait until you feel poorly to talk with your physician as the treatment is less effective the later it is given. Also, once you qualify for hospital admission, you no longer meet the requirements for monoclonal antibody treatment.

Reid has set up a temporary clinic for its infusions in Reid Plaza on National Road West in Richmond, just two doors down from the Reid Health PACE Center.

Patients need a physician's referral to get an appointment. If a referral is needed on the weekends, call Reid's COVID-19 hotline at (765) 965-4200. The hotline is available 8 a.m.-8 p.m. seven days a week. Staff will be able to help you find the most efficient way to obtain a referral and answer any questions you might have about monoclonal antibody infusions.

Today's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 76
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 63 (82.9%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 14
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 13 (92.9%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 11
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 11 (100%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 268
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 53 (19.8% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 30

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

The 4th Street Fair Celebrates 40 Years

Posted September 23, 2021

Logo: 4th Street FairJoin Senior Opportunities Services (SOS) in celebrating the 40th anniversary of the 4th Street Fair in Richmond, Indiana. The fair will run along South 4th Street, between South A and E Streets, from 10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. on Saturday, October 2 and Sunday, October 3, 2021.

Explore the stunning architecture of the Old Richmond Historic District, shop with over 100 arts and crafts vendors, enjoy the fun family-friendly activities, and feast on the delicious offerings provided by our food vendors.

This year's fair will include FREE live music and entertainment on both days. There will be seating areas to not only to connect with your friends, but also to relax and eat. We'll also have a few surprises in store for the young and young at heart!

In celebration of the 40th anniversary, limited edition 4th Street Fair Commemorative Tote Bags and Historic Old Richmond Coloring Books will also be available.

Come out and support our artisans while supporting the services offered by SOS. This is a rain or shine event.

This year's fair promises to provide an invigorated and renewed atmosphere thanks to the outstanding support of our volunteers and community sponsors.

Volunteers are still needed, in addition to donations of gift baskets for the raffle tent.

For more details visit 4thStreetFair.com or call 765-962-1010.

Immunocompromised Can Get a Third COVID-19 Vaccine Dose Now

Posted September 23, 2021

While final details and approvals are worked out concerning COVID-19 vaccine booster shots, there is one group of people who already are eligible to receive an extra dose.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) now recommends moderately to severely immunocompromised people who received the two-dose Pfizer or Modera vaccine get a third shot at least 28 days after their second dose.

Those with compromised immune systems are at a high risk for severe COVID-19 illness, and even if vaccinated, their bodies might not build the same level of immunity to the regular two-dose series as those who aren't immunocompromised. A third dose is intended to provide greater protection against the virus.

Among the examples given by the CDC of those who are moderately to severely immunocompromised are anyone who has:

  • Been receiving active cancer treatment for tumors or cancers of the blood,
  • Received an organ transplant and is taking medication to suppress the immune system,
  • Received a stem cell transplant within the past two years or is taking medication to suppress the immune system,
  • Moderate or severe primary immunodeficiency (such as DiGeorge syndrome or Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome),
  • Advanced or untreated HIV infection, and
  • Active treatment with high-dose corticosteroids or other drugs that might suppress the immune system.

The CDC recommends people talk with their healthcare provider about their particular medical condition and whether the additional dose is appropriate for them.

Those with compromised immune systems are at a high risk for severe COVID-19 illness, and even if vaccinated, their bodies might not build the same level of immunity to the regular two-dose series as those who aren't immunocompromised. A third dose is intended to provide greater protection against the virus.

Free vaccinations are available at a number of nearby locations. Indiana residents can find sites and sign up for an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.

Those who received either the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine should get a third dose of the same vaccine. If the same vaccine isn't available, either of the mRNA vaccines can be used.

At this point, the CDC's extra-dose recommendation for immunocompromised people does not include those who received the Johnson & Johnson vaccine. The CDC says there isn't enough data at this time to determine if another dose of that vaccine would improve results.

If you have questions about the vaccine, call Reid Health's COVID-19 hotline at (765) 965-4200. The hotline is available 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. seven days a week to help with scheduling a test, receiving test results, and clinical advice. Since the hotline was established on Aug. 26, more than 5,400 community members have taken advantage of the service.

Today's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 77
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 64 (83.1%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 13
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 13 (100%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 13
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 13 (100%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 365
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 62 (17% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 17

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Local Volunteers Honored with Golden Hoosier Award

Posted September 23, 2021

Linda Morris of Parker City, Jan Bronnenberg of Anderson, and Edna Cox of Richmond were three of 21 older adults to receive the Golden Hoosier Award from the State of Indiana at a virtual ceremony on Wednesday, September 15. The Golden Hoosier Award acknowledges outstanding Indiana senior citizens for the impact they have made on the lives of others and their entire community. The award is the highest honor given to a senior in Indiana.

Jan Bronnenberg was one of two recipients of the LifeStream Golden Hoosier Award, and Linda Morris and Edna Cox were both recognized as runner-up candidates for the LifeStream Golden Hoosier Award. Additional honorees of the LifeStream Golden Hoosier Award include Jane Ann Runyon of Portland, and Ann Herman of Richmond. The LifeStream Golden Hoosier Award is announced in the Spring and acknowledges outstanding volunteerism among senior citizens in LifeStream's 12 county service area including Blackford, Delaware, Fayette, Franklin, Grant, Henry, Jay, Madison, Randolph, Rush, Union, and Wayne counties. LifeStream then nominates the recipients and runner-up candidates for the statewide Golden Hoosier Award.

Linda Morris, a retired teacher of 33 years in rural Randolph County, Ind., is devoted to giving back to her community. One cause in particular that is close to her heart is the Historic Farmland USA Community Center. Linda has been a board member since 2018 and is now the president. She not only oversees the daily operations, but is continuously seeking opportunities to enhance the programs and the senior center. Additionally, Linda worked with a group to re-establish the only senior center in Randolph County in 2019 where she has been instrumental in establish its 501c(3) status.

At 86 years old Edna Cox spends her time giving back to her community. Her volunteer work includes 15 years with the Wayne County 4H Fair where she assists in judging and donates items for crafting for 4H and the Special Clovers. Additionally, Edna has volunteered at the Centerville-Abington Senior Center with LifeStream's meal program for nearly 20 years. She helps with home-delivered meals to homebound senior citizens and assists in delivery of food with the LifeStream-Gleaners monthly food distribution. When asked why she volunteers Edna stated: "I do what someone needs and sometimes I don't think I do enough. I love helping others. That is what life is all about – doing for others!"

Get Your COVID-19 Questions Answered Live Thursday Night

Posted September 23, 2021

If you have questions about vaccinations or anything else related to COVID-19, you can get them answered live Thursday night during a special presentation of Whitewater Community Television's "IN Focus" program.

The show will feature a trio of physicians, including Thomas Huth, M.D., Vice President of Medical Affairs for Reid Health; David Jetmore, M.D., Wayne County Health Officer; and Paul Rider, M.D., Wayne County Health Board President.

Huth and Jetmore were the featured guests of WCTV's "Ask the Doctors" program that ran for some 65 weeks from the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic through the middle of June. The duo has been featured on "IN Focus" twice since "Ask the Doctors" ended.

If you have a question you'd like to have answered during Thursday's program, it can be emailed to WCTV at WCTV@iue.edu by 5 p.m. Thursday. During the show, questions can be posed by asking on the WCTV Facebook page or by sending them via Twitter to @WCTVinfo.

"IN Focus" airs Thursdays at 6 p.m. on WGTV, Channel 11 on Comcast cable in Wayne County. Those who live outside Wayne County or who don't have Comcast can watch the show live on WCTV's Facebook page as well as on WGTV Online.

Replays can be seen on WGTV, Channel 11, Thursday at 10:30 p.m., Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 8 a.m. and 9 p.m., and Sunday at 8 a.m. and 1 p.m. Audio-only replays can be heard Sunday mornings on G101.3 and sister station ESPN Radio 1490 & 100.9 WKBV. A recording of the program also is available on WGTV Online in the "Video on Demand" section.

Today's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 87
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 71 (81.6%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 15
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 14 (93.3%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 9
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 9 (100%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 409
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 55 (13.4% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 29
Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

2021 Girls Inc. Signature Event to be Held on November 13th

Posted September 22, 2021

Supplied Image: Girl in Cape

Girls Inc. of Wayne County invites you to the 2021 Girls Inc. Signature Event on Saturday, November 13, 2021 at 6:00 p.m. at the Forest Hills Country Club, 6139 South 23rd Street, Richmond, IN 47374.

The event will honor:

  • Ann Brooks: 20 plus years at Harrington Hoch
  • Becky Jewison: Retired from Reid after 10 years
  • Ella Watson: 11 year old Studen and Girls Inc. member

Tickets are $75 each. Cocktail attire.

Purchase a tribute ad to honor someone who you see as a hero or to Congratulate the honorees.

For Tribute details, please RSVP to msoper@girlsincwayne.org by October 25th.

Changes Coming to Reid Health's Administrative Team

Posted September 22, 2021

Reid Health has added two members to its administrative team, part of a handful of changes coming to the health system's leadership.

Michelle McClurg recently was promoted to the role of Vice President/Chief Patient Experience Officer and Pamela Jones joined Reid as Vice President/General Counsel.

McClurg came to Reid in 2001 and last served as Food & Nutrition Services Director until moving to Director of Patient Experience in 2013.

She is a clinical dietitian with a degree in dietetics from Ball State University and a master's in family and consumer services, also from Ball State.

McClurg will continue to oversee the Call Center, Innovations, Volunteer and Chaplain Services, Information Desk, and Switchboard teams and in her new role will add Patient Transportation and Food & Nutrition Services.

Jones comes to Reid from the Midland Health system in Midland, Texas, where she has worked in a similar role since 2019. Before that, she was part of the Franciscan Health system in Indiana. In total, Jones brings to Reid more than 20 years of experience in healthcare.

She has a bachelor's in psychology from Purdue University and earned her law degree from Indiana University.

Her initial duties will include management of legal matters for Reid as well as administrative responsibility for the Reid Health Police Department, Reid Health Physician Associates Contracting, and Risk Management.

Other changes coming to Reid's administrative team include the eventual retirement of a longtime leader of the Reid Health Foundation and the return of a former member of the foundation's staff.

Randy Kirk, who has served in leadership positions at the Reid Foundation since 1997, plans to retire at the end of September 2022. Kirk began his time with Reid as the foundation's executive director and currently serves as Vice President/Foundation President.

He has a bachelor's in natural resources and biology from Ball State and master's degrees in natural resources and business management, also from Ball State.

Former foundation director Jason Troutwine will return to Reid as a Vice President in January. In his new role, Troutwine will oversee Volunteers, Marketing & Communications, Community Outreach, and Community Benefit.

Upon Kirk's retirement, Troutwine also will assume responsibility for the Reid Foundation.

Troutwine's first stint with Reid began in 2004 as a Development Associate before he became the manager and eventually the director of the foundation.

He currently is the Vice Chancellor for External Affairs at his alma mater, Indiana University East. He has served in the role since 2014, providing oversight of the campus' marketing, communications, web development, public affairs and government relations, advancement, alumni relations, event planning, and community engagement programs.

Rehabilitation Services Help Patient Recover from COVID-19

Posted September 22, 2021

When Pam Hall lost consciousness, it was November. The next time she woke up, everything had changed.

She was no longer at Reid Health Hospital. She wasn't even in Richmond.

Fall had given way to winter. The holiday season had come and gone. A new year had just begun.

Two months had passed since Hall had last opened her eyes.

"I had a hard time conceiving how long I had been out," she said.

Because of COVID-19, Hall would spend a total of five months in various hospitals and face a long road to recovery. When she began therapy at Reid's Acute Rehabilitation Unit, she couldn't stand on her own and the range of motion in her arms was limited, among other problems.

But in the weeks and months that followed, Reid staff guided her toward improvement.

"All the nurses, aides, and therapists, everyone I've had has been great," Hall said. "I can't say enough about all of them. They're so giving and personal and have done so much for me."

For the first week after she tested positive for COVID-19, the Cambridge City resident and mother of three dealt with the illness at home. But when her oxygen level started dropping, she went to Reid's Emergency Department where she was admitted to the hospital.

Three days later, Hall was sedated and put on a ventilator. As her condition worsened, she eventually was transferred to one and then another Indianapolis hospital, where she finally recovered enough to be removed from the ventilator.

Another month passed before Hall returned to Reid to begin her rehabilitation. Pain and stiffness in her arms and legs left her unable to do much for herself.

"I had a really hard time because I was frustrated," Hall said. "I couldn't do anything. I was dependent on so many people."

Supplied Photo: Pam Hall
Pam Hall continues to attend rehab sessions at Reid Health as part of the Pulmonary Rehab maintenance program as she recovers from COVID-19.

Three hours a day of therapy -- a combination of occupational, physical, and speech -- began with the initial goal of being able to stand and walk again. That task was made more difficult by extreme neuropathy in her left foot.

"They would try to stretch me out, but it hurt so bad," Hall said. "Every day I just kept thinking I've got to push myself further and further."

About two weeks in, she finally was able to stand and take a couple of steps with the assistance of parallel bars ("That was just unbelievable," she said). After another two weeks, she took six steps.

"I was crying because I could finally see I was showing some improvement," Hall said. "They kept telling me it was going to come. They were so encouraging, but they also pushed me when they knew I needed to be pushed."

A new illness -- C. diff, possibly caused by her long hospital stay -- impeded her improvement and jeopardized her time in the rehab unit, but Reid staff worked to make sure she could stay for another five weeks.

"That's the reason I'm walking today," Hall said.

Staff did more than just take care of her physical needs. Knowing Hall usually colored her hair, one therapist bought a box of dye and then she and a nurse did Hall's hair for her.

"It was just little things like that to try to lift my spirits, not only taking care of my body but taking care of me," Hall said.

By the time she left the ARU, Hall could care for herself again, getting around with the help of a walker. A COVID-caused blood clot about a month later necessitated a return trip to the hospital and forced her ongoing therapy to be paused for several weeks.

Nearly a year after catching COVID-19, Hall's journey to recovery continues with four days a week of therapy as part of Reid's Pulmonary Rehab maintenance program. She's walking without assistance but with a light brace on her left leg. Her lung function has improved -- Pulmonary Rehab staff helped her go from needing four liters of oxygen to 0.5 -- but she still needs oxygen for daily activity.

"I still get frustrated," Hall said. "I want to be able to do the things I want to do. There were things I missed that I won't be able to get back.

"But I've definitely made big strides since April, and I'm grateful for everything the Reid team has done to help me get this far."

"To anyone who thinks COVID isn't real, I would say just live a day in my shoes. I get frustrated and wish people would just get vaccinated. ... Everyone should know anyone can have major complications no matter how healthy you are." -- Pam Hall

COVID has left Hall with a high resting heart rate for which she takes medication. She'll be on blood thinners for the rest of her life, and the neuropathy in her left foot causes constant pain. She's unsure if she'll ever be able to go without extra oxygen.

"To anyone who thinks COVID isn't real, I would say just live a day in my shoes. I get frustrated and wish people would just get vaccinated," said Hall, who was vaccinated during her recovery.

"I took it seriously. I wore a mask and tried to follow all the protocols, but I was more afraid I would give it to my parents than I was afraid of getting it myself. Since I was a healthy adult, I believed if I got it, I wouldn't have major complications.

"Everyone should know anyone can have major complications no matter how healthy you are."

Today's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 86
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 70 (81.4%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 14
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 14 (100%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 10
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 10 (100%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 418
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 40 (9.6% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 29

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

News Archives

FacebookYouTubeFlickrTwitter

WayNet is Sponsored by:
We R Richmond - Richmond Community Schools
Morrisson-Reeves Library
City of Richmond, Indiana
Reid Health

Community Photo

More Photos:
Wayne County | WayNet Albums

Did You Know?

Fossiliferous limestone of the Ordovician Period in the Whitewater Gorge is 425 Million years old. It is one of only two places in the United States where this type of limestone is exposed to the surface.