News Releases

IU East's Run with the Wolves 5K Is July 16

Posted June 29, 2022

Supplied Photo: Rufus the Red Wolf RunsRegistration is open for the 2022 IU East Run with the Wolves Saturday, July 16.

Part of the Wayne County Challenge series, the annual event draws hundreds of participants. Early registration is encouraged to ensure getting this year's official 5K shirt. Terry Wiesehan, director of Alumni Relations at IU East, expects an even larger turnout this year.

"Our run is a fun event for everyone, whether you love to run or just take a stroll on a beautiful course with the kids," Wiesehan said.

The event takes place on campus and the Red Wolves' cross country course, located behind Hayes Hall. The Run with the Wolves includes a "Run with Rufus" 1K family run/walk.

All pre-registrants receive a Run with the Wolves race shirt. Pre-register by Friday, July 8, to ensure a shirt.

Day-of-race registration opens at 7 a.m. on July 16 at the Hayes Hall patio, located on the lower level of the building. The 5K run/walk starts at 8 a.m. followed by the "Run with Rufus" at 9:05 a.m. Awards will be presented at 9:25 a.m. at the Hayes Hall patio.

Run with the Wolves is part of the Wayne County Challenge series and supports student scholarship programs funded through the IU East Alumni Association.

Register online at iue.edu/5k. The pre-registration cost is $20, and day-of registration is $25. Students in grades K-12 and college can pre-register for $15 or register on race day for $20.

For more information, contact Terry Wiesehan, director of Alumni Relations, at (765) 973-8221 or email twiesaha@iue.edu.

Medical Monday and Thriving Thursday in July Will Spotlight Senior Safety

Posted June 29, 2022

Supplied Photo: Reid Health Assistant Chief of Police Jeff Cappa (left) and Capt. Dennis Perkins (right) will discuss senior safety at July's Medical Monday and Thriving Thursday events.Familiar faces in local law enforcement will be the guest speakers at Reid Health's Medical Monday and Thriving Thursday events in July.

Former Wayne County Sheriff and current Reid Health Assistant Chief of Police Jeff Cappa will discuss senior safety during Medical Monday at 1 p.m. on July 11 at Central United Methodist Church, 1425 E. Main St. in Richmond.

For the same topic at Thriving Thursday, the speaker will be former Connersville Police Officer and current Reid Health Police Capt. Dennis Perkins. Thriving Thursday will begin at 11:30 a.m. on July 14 at the Fayette County Senior Center, 477 N. Grand Ave. in Connersville.

Both events are free to attend. To register, call Sharrie Harlin Davis at (765) 983-3000, ext. 4676. Masks are required.

Medical Monday and Thriving Thursday are supported by Reid Health Community Benefit. Harlin Davis started Medical Monday when she was working for the Minority Health Coalition and maintained it after joining Reid Health. The events have loyal followings, averaging 40 to 50 guests each month to learn about various health issues, community programs, and health screenings.

Grant Will Help Reid Health Improve Care for Survivors of Sexual Assault

Posted June 29, 2022

Reid Health's work to expand care for sexual assault survivors received a boost this month when the health system learned it had been awarded nearly $350,000 in federal grant funding.

The two-year grant will be used to support a coordinator position for Reid's Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners (SANE) program as well as to help ensure there's enough specially trained nursing staff to provide 24/7 coverage for incidents of sexual assault.

"We're very excited to receive this grant and the opportunity it provides to continue growing our SANE program," said Ryan Williams, Director of EMS, Forensics, and Trauma Services for Reid Health. "Nurses with this kind of specialized training are in short supply across the country. Having this at Reid is a great benefit to the communities we serve."

SANEs are nurses who have been through an extensive training program to teach them how to provide comprehensive care to sexual assault survivors. Reid has five nurses who have completed the adult/adolescent version of the training with more starting soon.

The program includes 40 hours of classroom time plus two days with live models to learn how to collect specimens that may be used as evidence. There are also multiple hours spent with different career fields involved in the sexual assault process such as a police ride-along, observing a federal court trial, job shadowing a prosecuting attorney, and spending time at a crime laboratory, STD clinic, victim services/patient advocate center, and more.

"We're very excited to receive this grant and the opportunity it provides to continue growing our SANE program. Nurses with this kind of specialized training are in short supply across the country. Having this at Reid is a great benefit to the communities we serve." -- Ryan Williams, Director of EMS, Forensics, and Trauma Services for Reid Health

Along with helping support Reid's SANE personnel needs, grant funds will be used to provide additional education to healthcare providers and to spread awareness in the community about victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, and other violent crimes.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than 1 in 3 women and 1 in 4 men experience sexual violence involving physical contact during their lives. In addition to the physical toll caused by an assault, there can be psychological trauma as well, leading to post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, anxiety, or suicidal thoughts.

About the grant

The Victims of Crime Act Grant Program distributes funds collected by U.S. Attorney's Offices, U.S. Courts, and the U.S. Bureau of Prisons in the form of fines and penalties against criminals convicted of federal crimes. The program is intended to support high-quality services that directly improve the health and well-being of victims of crime across the country.

Nominations Sought for 2022 Rhoads Humanity in Medicine Award

Posted June 29, 2022

Supplied Photo: Paul S. Rhoads, MDNominations for the 2022 Paul S. Rhoads Humanity in Medicine Award can be made beginning Saturday, June 25.

Any physician recommended for the honor must be a full-time member of the Reid Health medical staff and demonstrate one or more of the following traits and achievements:

Has a combined commitment to clinical quality (in medical knowledge, discernment, and practice) along with genuine compassion, sensitivity, and a caring attitude in dealing with patients, patients' families, and colleagues, AND/OR

Has been a leader and/or initiator of programs and services resulting in improvement in quality of health or life within Reid's service area, AND/OR

Has been consistently inspirational, encouraging, and helpful to colleagues, hospital staff, patients, and others in efforts to prevent or to alleviate illness or injury, and to enhance quality of healthcare in Reid's service area

Physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and previous winners are not eligible to be nominated.

The Paul S. Rhoads Humanity in Medicine Award is East Central Indiana's most prestigious medical honor and has been awarded yearly since 1983. The 2021 winner was Rohit Bawa, MD, Otolaryngology and Chair of the Reid Health Physician Associates Network Operating Council.

Nominations can be made at reidhealth.org/rhoads/nominations and will be accepted through Sunday, July 17.

IU East establishes Henry Family Scholarship

Posted June 29, 2022

Robin Henry hopes to encourage students attending Indiana University East to pursue their degree through establishing a new $25,000 scholarship endowment in honor of her parents, the Henry Family Scholarship.

Henry is from Richmond and a first-generation college graduate. Growing up it was never a question that she would attend college, and her parents, Homer W. Henry and Patricia "Pat" Sue Wampler Henry, were supportive of her education and career ambitions.

Homer Henry was the co-owner of and operated Klute-Beach-Henry Funeral Home in Richmond. Before then, he served in the U.S. Army during World War II and was a POW in Germany.

"Neither of my parents received a college degree," Henry said. "My father did attend some classes at Earlham College to prepare him for his mortuary science certification, but it was always assumed that I would attend college."

Henry believes that her parents were instrumental in her success. By establishing this scholarship in the memory of her parents, Henry hopes to provide award recipients with an awareness that someone believes in them and what they can achieve when they pursue their dreams and passion.

"The achievements that I have been able to accomplish so far in my career and personal life is because my dad and mom believed in me," Henry said.

Supplied Photo:  Robin Henry
Robin Henry of Richmond has established a new scholarship at IU East to honor her parents and the support they provided to her to pursue her education and career.

The Richmond High School 1977 graduate attended Ball State University. The first two years in college, she pursued a secondary education degree with a concentration in history. "But I didn't feel this was my calling," Henry said.

She changed her major and graduated with a bachelor's degree in political science. Henry completed an internship at the Indiana State House, working for three senators before returning to her hometown. "The economy wasn't great at that time, so I came back to Richmond and tried finding my way into different opportunities," Henry said.

She joined WQLK/WHON (KICKS 96) as an account executive and news reporter, working for the local station. Henry was also the executive director for Leadership Wayne County. She went back to her roots in government and worked with the City of Richmond, serving first in the role as the director of Community Partnerships and then as the director of Human Resources.

Later she attended IUPUI to earn her Master of Science in Adult Education. She also received certification as a Senior Professional in Human Resources through the Society for Human Resource Management.

Additionally, Henry has worked as an adjunct for Purdue University in Richmond. Within the community, Henry served on the board of directors for nearly 20 different community non-profits, including officer roles with the Richmond Art Museum, the Reid Health Governing Board and the Reid Health Foundation, Main Street Richmond/Wayne County and the Richmond Board of Works and Safety. She was appointed to Richmond City Council in 1982 at the age of 22 to fill the vacant third district seat making her the youngest citizen to serve on council to date.

More recently, Henry also was a founding committee member for Palette to Palate, a collaborative annual fundraiser for the Richmond Art Museum and IU East.

IU East Chancellor Kathy Girten said scholarships help to make an academic degree and other opportunities possible for students.

"We appreciate Robin's gift of generosity and admire her consideration to assist students by helping to cover the cost of their education, in an effort to provide the same assurance and support that she was given by her parents," Girten said.

Henry joined West End Bank as assistant vice president of Human Resources in 2002 and was later promoted as the executive vice president and chief human resource officer. Simultaneously, she started working on her Master of Adult Education at IUPUI in Indianapolis. Henry said she found graduate work to be a new experience, and the online experience was incredible. She especially appreciated the support of faculty like Henry Merrill. "College was a given in 1977, and I did it then for my parents and for myself. But, I really enjoyed my adult education degree. It was something I really wanted to do."

Today, Henry is the assistant vice president of Regional Human Resources for 3Rivers Federal Credit Union.

Starting out her path may not have been clear, she said, but she has found a unique path that has put her skills to use and brought her years of enjoyment, involvement and service to the community.

"When I look back at a total career, it wasn't a clear way to go. I kept my eyes open and looked for opportunities. Now looking back I just think, 'Wow, this has been quite the journey.' They have all been very different but have all involved my skillset," Henry said. "I have just really been blessed."

Now, she is looking forward to giving back so new generations can have the opportunity to continue to do the same.

"I see the value of IU East. Having the university here in the community, and I see what it has done for individuals in the community – for many who have continued to work while they pursued a college degree – truly, IU East is a community asset. IU East is now a college of choice for students out of high school," Henry said. "As an employer I appreciate the outstanding workforce IU East provides for us."

For information on how to contribute, contact Paula Kay King, director of Gift Development, at (765) 973-8331 or pkayking@iue.edu.

Main Street Richmond IN and The Tin Lizzie Cafe Collaborate to Keep Restaurant Open and Serving the Community, as Sip 'n a Bite Deli

Posted June 24, 2022

Supplied Graphic/Photo: Sip n a Bite

Main Street Richmond's mission is to enrich downtown by coordinating and collaborating with city government, property owners and business owners resulting in economic prosperity, community development and a vibrant center city. "This is exactly what we are doing with the help of Ron & Rachel Hughes, current owners of The Tin Lizzie Café," says Beth Newton, Director of Main Street Richmond.

Main Street Richmond will be purchasing the building currently home to The Tin Lizzie Café and Tin Cup Tea Shop. Newton says, "Our goal is to ensure the property stays in the hands of a local owner and will be able to continue to provide restaurant service to the community. In addition, we will be making plans to continue the revitalization efforts initiated by the Hughes family".

As Ron's retirement was announced, there was interest in the restaurant space, but not the entire building. Main Street Richmond also had ideas for the space the building offered. This created an opportunity for Main Street Richmond to collaborate with Ron and Rachel to connect all interested parties and come up with a plan. "We are thrilled to work with Teresa and John Leith, the new owners of the restaurant, to meet the needs of the community and accomplish each of our individual goals," Newton says.

Teresa and her daughter, Natalie Johns, will be taking over operation of the restaurant which will be known as Sip 'n a Bite Deli, beginning July 11th at 8:00am. With Ron's retirement, his last day will be June 30th . The restaurant will be closed Friday, July 1st, and the week of July 4th , but will reopen under new ownership on July 11th . "This essentially makes the transition seamless for patrons, as they are used to us being closed the week of July 4th ," says Hughes. "We are thrilled that we found a local buyer who can continue the restoration we started and that they are partnering with Teresa and John. The Leith's will continue the 50-year tradition of running a restaurant on this spot and we are so excited that another local couple stepped up to make that possible," Ron Hughes added.

June 30 Deadline Approaching for 21st Century Scholarship Enrollment

Posted June 29, 2022

(INDIANAPOLIS) – Indiana seventh- and eighth-grade students can still apply for the 21st Century Scholars program, but the June 30 deadline is quickly approaching. Led by the Indiana Commission for Higher Education, the 21st Century Scholarship is the state's early college promise program that provides up to four years of undergraduate tuition and fees for eligible students at Indiana colleges and universities.

To qualify, students must apply during their seventh- or eighth-grade year (students cannot apply past June 30 of their eighth-grade year). Most students who qualify for the federal free and reduced lunch guidelines will qualify for the 21st Century Scholars program.

"The 21st Century Scholars Program created the opportunity for me to strive and excel throughout my college career. It gave me the chance to be a first-generation college graduate," said IUPUI graduate and 21st Century Scholars alum Melissa Aceves. "Through the Scholars program, I gained mentors who guided me, a scholarship for my tuition, a community of fellow Scholars and happiness because I had the opportunity to focus on my education as well as create an impact on the community."

For 30 years, the Indiana General Assembly has provided bipartisan support for the 21st Century Scholars program. Since its inception in 1990, more than 45,000 students have earned a degree or credential through the 21st Century Scholars program and there are more than 100,000 students enrolled between seventh grade and college seniors today. The Commission published a report about the program and its impact for Indiana earlier this year.

"The 21st Century Scholars program is a transformative opportunity for students," said Indiana Commissioner for Higher Education Chris Lowery. "This scholarship is one of the many ways Indiana has committed to ensuring students can access education and training beyond high school. It continues to be one of the proven tools to close educational equity gaps and help Hoosier students succeed."

Students in the 21st Century Scholars program go to college at much higher rates than the statewide average, with 81 percent of students who meet the program requirements enrolling in college, compared to the statewide average of 53 percent. The Commission's 2022 College Readiness Report also highlights how the program closes the race and ethnicity equity gap for low-income students.

However, opportunities exist to increase program utilization. Awareness of the 21st Century Scholars program remains a barrier to increasing participation. Currently, four in 10 high school graduates are financially eligible for the 21st Century Scholars program, but less than half enroll. The Commission is recommending all eligible students in seventh and eighth grade be automatically enrolled in the Scholars program.

"There are many organizations and volunteers that help enroll students into the 21st Century Scholars program. Indiana's middle school counselors and educators are working on this effort, and the Commission has an outreach team dedicated to this goal. All of that is still not enough, however. Enrolling all students who are eligible will clear a barrier for Hoosiers and would enable everyone to shift resources toward ensuring students are succeeding in high school and college and beyond," Lowery said.

Help with enrollment available

To best serve students, the Commission has split the state into eight outreach regions; and the Commission's outreach coordinators are available via phone or email. A full list of counties and associated numbers is available here.

Help is also available in Spanish by calling 317-232-1072 or 317-617-0318. Additionally, the Commission's Padres Estrellas, or "Star Parents" are available. Padres Estrellas work with community organizations focused on empowering Hoosier Hispanic and Latino communities to provide college and career support to students and families across the state.

¿Necesitas ayuda en español? Llame al 317-232-1072 o 317-617-0318.

Learn more and apply at www.Scholars.in.gov/enroll.

Are you a 21st Century Scholars alumni?

Please take a few minutes to complete the Commission's alumni survey and share how the 21st Century Scholarship impacted you personally and professionally. Your story can help inspire others.

Reid Health Conducts Active Shooter Drill

Posted June 24, 2022

Reid Health held an active shooter drill Thursday at the health system's main campus in Richmond and across its various other facilities.

The exercise tested the response of Reid Health staff in the event of an active shooter in the hospital or at the practice locations throughout Reid's service area.

"Drills are very important as a reminder for our staff. They also create opportunities to adjust our master plan and each department's plan," said Randy Kolentus, Chief of the Reid Health Police Department. "Over a year's time, things can change within a facility that would require we make some updates, so conducting regular drills allows us to identify those areas that need to be reviewed."

"The safety of our staff and all those who come to our facilities is of the utmost importance. Exercises like the drills conducted today help ensure we're prepared should we ever be called upon in such a situation." -- Randy Kolentus, Chief of the Reid Health Police Department

Local law enforcement and emergency agencies were alerted ahead of time, and precautions were taken to ensure patients and visitors were aware of the exercise, including signage and overhead announcements.

"We try to make the drills as real as we can without disrupting patient care," Kolentus said.

Last year, Reid Health completed a two-year transition from a security team to a police department, joining other health systems around the state. The move was made to enhance the security and safety of Reid Health team members, patients, and visitors.

"The safety of our staff and all those who come to our facilities is of the utmost importance," Kolentus said. "Exercises like the drills conducted today help ensure we're prepared should we ever be called upon in such a situation."

Reid Health in the Top 15% Of Hospitals in the U.S. For Outstanding Patient Experience, According to Healthgrades

Posted June 24, 2022

Reid Health has received the Healthgrades 2022 Outstanding Patient Experience Award™, a first for the health system.

The distinction places Reid among the top 15 percent of hospitals nationwide for patient experience, according to Healthgrades, the leading marketplace that connects people with the right doctor and hospital.

Healthgrades evaluated 3,173 hospitals that submitted at least 75 patient experience surveys to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), covering admissions from July 2020 to March 2021. Of those hospitals evaluated, 399 outperformed their peers -- based on their patients' responses -- to achieve the award.

"This honor is a reflection of the incredible dedication and hard work of the entire Reid Health team," said Craig Kinyon, Reid Health President/CEO. "What makes it even more remarkable is the period evaluated came during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic, a time when our team was pushed to its limits but continued to provide high-quality care to the communities we serve."

"This honor is a reflection of the incredible dedication andaluated came during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic, a time when our team was pushed to its limits but continued to provide high-quality care to the communities we serve." hard work of the entire Reid Health team. What makes it even more remarkable is the period ev-- Craig Kinyon, Reid Health President/CEO

"We're committed to creating an environment in which our patients and their families feel as comfortable as possible," said Michelle McClurg, Vice President/Chief Patient Experience Officer for Reid Health. "Everything we do is guided by our organizational values of excellence, empathy, integrity, and accountability."

Healthgrades evaluates performance by applying a scoring methodology to 10 patient experience measures, using data collected from surveys of the hospital's patients. Questions focus on patients' perspectives of their care in the hospital.

Topics range from cleanliness and noise levels in patient rooms to medication explanations and hospital staff responsiveness to patients' needs. The measures also include whether a patient would recommend the hospital to friends or family and their overall rating of the hospital.

"We applaud all recipients of the Healthgrades 2022 Outstanding Patient Experience Award for putting patient experience at the front and center within their organizations," said Brad Bowman, MD, Chief Medical Officer and Head of Data Science, Healthgrades.

"We commend these hospitals for their ongoing commitment in prioritizing an exceptional patient experience, while ensuring the health and safety of their patients."

Consumers can visit healthgrades.com for more information about how hospital quality was measured and access the complete methodology here.

Whitewater Community Television Adds New Way to Watch Local Stations

Posted June 22, 2022

Until now, programming on the Whitewater Community Television "family of stations" WCTV, public access, WETV, educational access and WGTV, government access was available only to residents in Wayne County with Comcast cable. This morning, Whitewater Community Television announced that technology has created a change that will allow many more residents to view WCTV's 3 channels on their television. Whitewater Community Television recently agreed to share its programming with Didja, Inc., which operates LocalBTV, a platform that provides 24/7 viewing of live television most mobile and streaming devices.

Residents can start watching Whitewater Community Television channels immediately by going to: https://www.localbtv.com/ where Apple, Android, and Fire TV's and Roku support is available as well as by going to the Google or App store for their mobile devices. The app includes a DVR feature for delayed viewing of programs. There are two sides of this app, one for over the air channels like HSN, COZI, QVC and a growing list of commercial stations, and a community side for more hyperlocal channels like the Whitewater Community Television family of stations which can be found on 74.1, 74.2 and 74.3.

Of significance, this agreement opens WCTV programming to residents throughout the Indianapolis DMA. So as the EDC, EIRPC, the Eastern Indiana Regional Planning Commission and others work across county lines, WCTV and other community partners can assist in sharing content that has regional significance.

Whitewater Community Television is a 501c3 not-for-profit corporation that has been serving Wayne County residents with Public, Education and Government (PEG) services since 1988. As technology has changed, WCTV has worked to make programs more accessible to residents with both streaming and Video on Demand services through WGTV Online: https://wgtv.viebit.com, Facebook and You Tube. Additional information on available job openings, community events and more are shared using Twitter, @WCTVinfo, Instagram and Facebook.

Reid Health Celebrates 5 New Graduates of Family Medicine Residency Program

Posted June 21, 2022

Supplied Image: Graduates of Reid Health's Family Medicine Residency Program (from left): Kapesh Kunwar, MD; Brandon Baccari, DO; Nabeel Uwaydah, MD; Mehrosh Naseem, MD; and Nida Noor, MD.Reid Health is saying goodbye to five graduates of its Family Medicine Residency Program and hello to a handful of new doctors who will soon begin their own three-year stint.

Members of the Class of 2022 were celebrated Saturday at Forest Hills Country Club. Each will finish their time at the Reid Health Residency Clinic in Richmond over the coming weeks before moving on to the next step in their careers.

"This class represents many significant changes for the program," said Phillip Scott, DO, FAAFP, Residency Program Director.

"They're the first class with MD and international physicians. Also, this group learned to deal with COVID-19 from the first year of their training."

Those graduating in the 2022 class include:

  • Brandon Baccari, DO, who will work for Lutheran Health in Fort Wayne, Ind.;
  • Kapesh Kunwar, MD, who will work for IU Health in Indianapolis;
  • Mehrosh Naseem, MD, who has been accepted to an Integrative Medicine fellowship at The Ohio State University;
  • Nida Noor, MD, who is undecided; and
  • Nabeel Uwaydah, MD, who also is undecided.

Reid's residency program is affiliated with the Kansas City University of Medicine and Bioscience in Kansas City, Mo. Graduates complete three years of training in family medicine, gaining a wide-ranging experience in the Reid Health system.

"This class represents many significant changes for the program. They're the first class with MD and international physicians. Also, this group learned to deal with COVID-19 from the first year of their training." -- Phillip Scott, DO, FAAFP, Residency Program Director

Five new doctors will join the program in July, bringing the total number of residents to 18. Five core faculty members - Dr. Scott; Nuzhat Nisa, MD; Novera Inam, MD; Donald Smith, MD; and Tim Kaehr, MA, LMFT - supervise the residents' overall training, along with 75 community physicians who act as preceptors across a variety of medical specialties.

The residents in Reid's program include:

  • Advancing second-year residents Jonathan Adams, DO; Adebisi Adeyemi, MD; Waiel Almardini, MD; Kimberly Carhuatanta, DO; Dustin Cundiff, DO; Ibrahim Khan, MD; and Abdallah Saleh, MD
  • Advancing first-year residents Kristopher Brott, DO; Shruti Dave, MD; Tanner Everhart, DO; Nicholas Hinkle, DO; Joseph Intriago, MD; and Sara Khan, MD
  • New residents Bothaina Afifi, MD; Vijay Gottipati, MD; Nicole Hountz, DO; Jeffery Lee, MD; and Benjamin Leeds, DO

"It's remarkable to think we've had this program for almost seven years now," Dr. Scott said. "As of this year, we'll have graduated 24 family physicians and kept many excellent physicians in the Richmond area. We hope to keep even more here in the future."

Singles Interaction, Inc.

Posted June 13, 2022

Supplied Newsletter: July 2022

If you are 21 years of age or better and single, divorced, widow or widower, Singles' Interaction invites you to join them on Friday nights. Come to the Eagles Lodge, 75 South 12th Street, Richmond (membership not required) and meet other single people in the Richmond area.

Smart Futures Dinner to Honor Club Alum Desmond Bane

Posted June 8, 2022

Supplied Flyer: Smart Futures Dinner

Come join the Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County for our 23rd Annual Smart Futures Dinner! This event celebrates the links between Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County, the community, and some exceptional individuals. Our featured guest speaker will be NBA Superstar, and Richmond native, Desmond Bane.

Social Hour will begin at 6:00pm and dinner catered by Galos will begin at 7:00pm.

Dress is smart casual - from khakis to slacks. If you feel good, you look good.

Please RSVP by Tuesday, July 12th.

Nettle Creek Players Summer Stock Tent Theatre Returns in June and July

Posted June 8, 2022

National, Regional & Local Theatre Artists Line-Up Announced for 2022 Summer Residencey in Hagerstown, Indiana

Logo: Nettle Creek PlayersNettle Creek Players, a 501c3 not-for-profit arts organization in Hagerstown, Indiana, has announced its 2022 troupe of visiting professional theatre artists who will live in the community for nine weeks as they prepare and present the Nettle Creek Players 2022 Summer Stock Tent Theatre Season featuring productions of OLIVER!, A FUNNY THING HAPPENED ON THE WAY TO THE FORUM, and THE GIN GAME. Performances of OLIVER! will be at 7:00pm on June 24, 25, 30 & July 1 & 2 and at 2:00pm on June 26 with A FUNNY THING…FORUM at 7:00pm on July 8, 9, 14, 15 & 16 and at 2:00pm on July 10, and THE GIN GAME at 7:00pm on July 22, 23, 28, 29 & 30 and at 2:00pm on July 24. All performances will take place in the Nettle Creek Players Show Tent at 150 N. Plum Street in historic downtown Hagerstown, Indiana. Tickets are $18 per person for adults and $15 per person for students and seniors. Tickets and more information are available at www.nettlecreekplayers.com, at Facebook/NettleCreekPlayers and by phone at 765-914-7828.

"Oliver!" is Lionel Bart's classic musical based on the Charles Dickens novel, Oliver Twist. The Tony and Olivier Award-winning show is one of the few musicals to win an Academy Award for Best Picture and is widely hailed as a true theatrical masterpiece by audiences around the world. The streets of Victorian England come to life as Oliver, a malnourished orphan in a workhouse, becomes the neglected apprentice of an undertaker. Oliver escapes to London and finds acceptance amongst a group of petty thieves and pickpockets led by the elderly Fagin. When Oliver is captured for a theft that he did not commit, the benevolent victim, Mr. Brownlow takes him in. Fearing the safety of his hideout, Fagin employs the sinister Bill Sikes and the sympathetic Nancy to kidnap him back, threatening Oliver's chances of discovering the true love of a family.

"A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum" with book by Burt Shevelove and Larry Gelbart and Music by Stephen Sondheim takes comedy back to its roots, combining situations from time-tested, 2000-year-old comedies of Roman playwright, Plautus, with the infectious energy of classic vaudeville. Pseudolus, a crafty servant, struggles to win the hand of a beautiful, but slow-witted, courtesan named Philia for his young master, Hero, in exchange for freedom. The plot twists and turns with cases of mistaken identity, slamming doors and a showgirl or two. The classic Broadway musical romp through Rome has desperate lovers, scheming neighbors and secrets behind every toga.

"The Gin Game," a play by D.L. Coburn, is the winner of the 1978 Pulitzer Prize for Drama, uses a card game as a metaphor for life. Weller Martin is playing solitaire on the porch of a seedy nursing home. Enter Fonsia Dorsey, a prim, self-righteous lady. They discover they both dislike the home and enjoy gin rummy, so they begin to play and to reveal intimate details of their lives. Fonsia wins every time, and their secrets become weapons used against one another. Weller longs for a victory to counter a lifetime of defeats, but it doesn't happen. He leaves the stage a broken man, and Fonsia realizes her self-righteous rigidity has led to an embittered, lonely, old age. Both laugh-out-loud funny and heartfelt, it has been a favorite of audiences for over four decades.

The visiting artists will live in the community, most in the homes of local volunteers. They will rehearse the shows for 2 1⁄2 weeks and perform for six weekends. The professional actors and visiting artists-in-residence that will form the 2022 core company include the following:

  • James Stover, an Assistant Professor of Theater at Purdue University Fort Wayne is an actor, director, writer and producer having worked at notable theatre across the country, on television and in independent film. He holds an MFA in Theatre Pedagogy from Virginia Commonwealth University and a BFA in Musical Theatre from Otterbein University. He will play the role of Pseudolus in "…Forum.";
  • Barry McMullen is from Muncie, Indiana and is the co-owner of Think Dog! Productions. Barry performed with Nettle Creek Players in the 1990's. He will play Senex in "…Forum" and Weller in "The Gin Game.";
  • Jordan Wolfe originally comes from Richmond, Indiana and is a graduate of Earlham College. Jordan previously appeared with Nettle Creek Players in 2018 and 2019. He will play Mr. Bumble in "Oliver!" and Hero in "…Forum.";
  • Patrick Vaughn of Louisville, Kentucky and has been seen on stage at Actors Theatre of Indiana, Commonweal Theatre in Minnesota and at Dollywood. He will play the role of Bill Sykes in "Oliver!";
  • Michael Bartkiewicz is a native of Fort Wayne, Indiana and has performed Off-Broadway, at the Vineyard Theater and for Paw Patrol Live. He will play Hysterium in "…Forum.";
  • Zoe O'Hailin-Berne is from Shelbyville, Indiana, studied theatre at Ball State University and has performed regionally and on national tours. She will play Lycus in "…Forum.";
  • Rebecca Lea Evans comes to Hagerstown from St. Louis and is a graduate of Ball State University. She will play The Widow Corney in "Oliver!" and Domina in "…Forum.";
  • Nicole Leis is originally from Ansonia, Ohio and graduated from Indiana Wesleyan University. She will play the role of Nancy in "Oliver!";
  • Abigail Johnson is studying musical theater at Marymount Manhattan College in New York City. She will play Bet in "Oliver!" and Philia in "…Forum.";
  • Evan Snaufer is from Fort Wayne, Indiana where he is a theater major at Purdue University Fort Wayne. He will play Noah in "Oliver!" and Protean in "…Forum.";
  • Audrey Shockett is a student at Ball State University in Muncie, Indiana and will play The Artful Dodger in "Oliver!" and a Courtesan in "…Forum.";
  • Justin Amellio-Ashbrook is an award-winning director and Associate Professor of Theater at Indiana University South Bend. He will play Miles Gloriosus in "…Forum.";
  • Sara Breeze is from Kansas and will play Fonsia in "The Gin Game.";
  • Susannah Briscoe has been performing, teaching and choreographing for over thirty years and is currently enrolled in a two-year Meisner Acting Program at The Phoenix Theater in Indianapolis. She will play Mrs. Sowerberry in "Oliver!" and a Courtesan in "…Forum" and will serve as choreographer for the season.;

Several local performers and Nettle Creek Players from years past will also join the company. They include the following:

  • Larry Beck is originally from Elkhart, Indiana. He now lives in Muncie where he is host and producer of BlueNotes Classic Jazz at Indiana Public Radio and Associate Director Emeritus for the Career Center at Ball State University. He will play Mr. Brownlow in "Olvier!";
  • Brad Dale is from Hagerstown. He is a Nettle Creek Player alum from the 1970's and is a current board member of the organization. He will play Erronius in "…Forum."
  • Elizabeth Stracener is a native of Richmond, Indiana and teaches in Hagerstown. She will play Sissy Sowerberry in "Oliver!";

The roles of Oliver and the children's chorus will be played by local students Eli Daniel, Josephine Daniel, Grace Bruns, Natalie Hobbs, Maycee Favorite and Charley Rinehart..

Music Director for the season will be Gilda McClure Lewis who is a native of Connersville, Indiana, is an NCP alum from the 1980's and will play Mrs. Bedwin in "Oliver!" and a Courtesan in "…Forum." She will be assisted in Music Direction by Accompanist Lisa Ginn.

The artistic quality of the project is overseen by Artistic Director Greg Gasman, former Technical Director at Muncie Civic Theatre and former Artistic Director for several theatres in Minnesota. Gasman will direct all three productions, oversee all technical aspects of the project and play the role of Fagin in "Oliver!" He will be assisted over the summer by Production Stage Manager Sarah Hobson.

Nettle Creek layers is a 501c3 non-profit organization and is grateful to its corporate and foundational sponsors for underwriting some of the costs associated with presenting the 2022 Summer Season. Among the sponsors and supporters of Nettle Creek Players are the following: The Indiana Arts Commission, The National Endowment for the Arts, The Randolph Community Foundation, Meridian Health, The Wayne County Foundation, The Town of Hagerstown, Greenfield Tent Company, The Nettle Creek School Corporation, CJD Enterprise, Inc., The Hagerstown Library, and Earlham College.

For tickets and information visit www.nettlecreekplayers.com and Facebook/NettleCreekPlayers or call 765-914-7828. Photos of the cast are available on the web site and Facebook page and can be emailed by request. The cast and artistic company are also available for interviews or special performances by request at 765-914-7828.

Summer Reading Program at MRL

Posted May 18, 2022

Supplied Flyer: MRL Summer Reading Poster

Local library users know summertime is an awesome time to visit the library! Experience all the fun as Morrisson-Reeves Library (MRL) kicks off its annual Summer Reading Program "Oceans of Possibilities" on Monday, June 6th. Participants can pre-register online at MRLinfo.org or inside the library starting on May 23rd. On June 6th, patrons can start tracking their reading and activities progress from their digital device, as well as earn badges and prizes, play fun games and learn valuable tips. The program is free and open to the public. It runs through Saturday, July 16.

Tracking you and your family's reading progress is easy and quick with the online tracking system. If you wish to track your reading in-person at the library, ask library staff to track things when you visit the library.

Looking for family fun throughout the summer. A wide variety of programs are offered for various ages from pre-schoolers to teens to adults. A sampling of the programs offered are yoga for teens, storytimes, art programs, how to be a pirate, author visits, reading clubs, and adult game nights. If you are wanting to attend programs in-person at the library, registration is required for some of our events. Links to registration and full program details can be found at MRLinfo.org/events.

Have you ever wondered how big a Blue Whale or an Orca might be? Explore the library's family fun adventure "A Whale of a Good Time - Seek and Find" at MRL. You can stand next to a measurement of a Blue Whale that could be as big as 90 feet long!

This year's premiere sponsor for the Summer Reading Program is the Friends of Morrisson-Reeves Library. The Wayne County Foundation is also sponsoring library programs through the Challenge Match program.

Morrisson-Reeves Library has served the people of Richmond, Indiana since 1864. MRL is well known for signature services and programs like Storytimes, Free Computer Classes, Reading Clubs, Reader's Advisory, Local History, Research, and 1,000 Books Before Kindergarten. The library's Strategic Plan supports the mission of "connecting people to information, inspiration, and infinite opportunities." which positions MRL to respond to areas of urgent need: kids unprepared for kindergarten, third grade reading proficiency, high school graduation, college and career readiness and employment resources. MRL serves as the community's resource for lifelong learning.

Supplied Flyer: MRL June 2022 Calendar

Supplied Flyer:  MRL July 2022 Calendar

You May Be Ready to Move On From the COVID-19 Pandemic, but the Immunocompromised Can't

Posted June 8, 2022

Although many have relaxed their guard against COVID-19 -- choosing to no longer wear masks while in crowded public spaces, even when hospitalizations are on the rise -- there are some who remain highly vulnerable to the virus: in particular, the immunocompromised.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), anyone with a weakened immune system is at increased risk for severe COVID-19 illness and death. That includes people who have:

  • Been receiving active cancer treatment for tumors or cancers of the blood
  • Received an organ transplant and are taking medicine to suppress the immune system
  • Received chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy (a treatment to help your immune system attach to and kill cancer cells) or received a stem cell transplant within the past two years
  • Moderate or severe primary immunodeficiency such as DiGeorge syndrome or Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome
  • Advanced or untreated HIV infection
  • Active treatment with high-dose corticosteroids or other drugs that might suppress the immune response

Because of their increased risk, those who are immunocompromised are eligible to receive extra doses of the COVID-19 vaccine, four total for children ages 5-11 (three primary shots and one booster) and five for anyone 12 and older (three primary and two boosters).

The immunocompromised also may qualify for treatment with Evusheld, a long-lasting monoclonal antibody infusion that helps protect those who might not get an adequate immune response from vaccination. Their primary care provider can help them determine if they're candidate for the infusion.

If you don't have a weakened immune system, you can help protect those around you who do by getting vaccinated and staying up to date on your shots. Being vaccinated yourself reduces your likelihood for becoming infected with the virus and then passing it along to someone who is more vulnerable to severe illness.

FREE primary doses and booster shots of the vaccine are available to all those eligible to receive them at the Reid Health Residency Clinic, 795 Sim Hodgin Parkway in Richmond.

Walk-ins are welcome from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday-Thursday and 8 a.m. to noon Friday. Appointments can be made for those hours by calling Reid's COVID-19 Hotline at (765) 965-4200. The hotline is open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. seven days a week.

Indiana residents can find other nearby vaccination sites and schedule a time at those locations by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.

Gennett Records: The Birthplace of American Recorded Music Public Opening Program presented by First Bank Richmond

Posted May 18, 2022

Venue: Wayne County Historical Museum, 1150 North A Street, Richmond, IN 47374

Date: Sunday June 26, 2022, 1:00 pm to 5:00 pm

Admission: Free with regular museum admission.

The Wayne County Historical Museum is pleased to announce its 2022 Public Opening & Celebration of our newest exhibit Gennett Records: The Birthplace of American Recorded Music.

The exhibit public opening will transport attendees through the fascinating story of Gennett Records and the contributions made by the Gennett family. Gennett Records: The Birthplace of American Recorded Music will be on exhibit in various locations throughout the museum and will introduce visitors to this story in a new and interactive way. The Indiana Historical Society's Gennett Records: You are There 1927 will come to the Wayne County Historical Museum permanently as part of this collaborative special exhibition. Visitors can enjoy the special exhibit until Spring of 2023, and permanent elements will become part of the narrative of the museum's exhibits.

The Public Program will celebrate all things 1920's and give visitors an immersive experience through activities that highlight the 1920's in Wayne County .

The Public Opening celebration will feature live jazz music performed by Earlham Jazz Band. Visitors can meet authors Linda Gennett Irmscher and Charlie Dahan and purchase a personally signed copy of Starr Piano and Gennett Records. Visitors can learn to dance like they did in the 1920's, take a Model T ride, attend a viewing and question and answer session with the producer of the PBS documentary The Music Makers of Gennett Records, Todd Gould. The museum will offer tours of Reid Church throughout the day as the Gennetts recorded sound effects of the pipe organ there. 1920's crafts, games, and other interactive activities will engage visitors of all ages!

So put on your 'Glad Rags' and take a trip back to the 1920s, you will definitely be the 'Bee's Knees'!

This annual signature public program allows for YOUR Wayne County Historical Museum to continue our mission to educate the public, promote, collect, preserve, and interpret the rich heritage of Wayne County, Indiana and illustrate the county's role in American and World Culture.

New BOSS Experience has graduates exploring their path toward success as entrepreneurs

Posted June 8, 2022

Six recent Indiana University East graduates have a variety of visions – and roadmaps – as they forge forward as budding entrepreneurs.

That's not a problem. Every journey is different.

The Richmond area offers undeniable proof with dozens of examples of highly successful entrepreneurial success stories ranging from local to national to worldwide.

The new graduates delved into some of those stories in a unique two-week pilot program called the BOSS Experience. They listened to speakers, visited successful companies and were presented with ideas for business plans. In addition, they were even paid a salary to do so.

The pioneering program helped them see their potential futures through the lenses of local business visionaries. It offered ways to find resources to reach their goals.

Following are some of the students' stories:

  • Dailen Troutman of Indianapolis wants to start an affordable clothing line that makes buyers feel good about themselves, but first will work as a graphic designer.
  • Jessica Maupin of Centerville, Indiana, has plans to attend medical school, but first needs to build a nest egg. So, she has started a home-based business that sells hand-painted Bible covers.
  • Colton Toms of New Paris, Ohio, aims to build wholesale businesses, including one that will deliver boxes of products by subscription. The boxes would include feel-good items such as Warm Glow Candles (a different scent every month), sauces and fruits. The purpose, he said, "is to support small businesses."
  • Reggie Reuss of Brookville, Indiana, plans an entrepreneurial focus on Smart Home Technology. He's in the planning stage now, going "where life takes me."
Supplied Photo: Recent graduates in the Class of 2022 at IU East participated in the School of Business and Economics new pilot program, the BOSS Experience. From left to right (front): Colt Meyer, Dailen Troutman, Garrett Silcott (back) Reggie Reuss, Joao de Lima, Colton Toms and Jessica Maupin
Recent graduates in the Class of 2022 at IU East participated in the School of Business and Economics new pilot program, the BOSS Experience. From left to right (front): Colt Meyer, Dailen Troutman, Garrett Silcott (back) Reggie Reuss, Joao de Lima, Colton Toms and Jessica Maupin.

They each returned the week after commencement, held on May 13, to campus for the BOSS Experience. They made daily trips during the program with the mission of delving into the successes of special businesses – big and small.

BOSS Experience is a new variation of the national award-winning BOSS program established 15 years ago by Tim Scales, director of the IU East Center for Entrepreneurship. Scales is a senior lecturer of business for the IU East School of Business and Economics.

BOSS was selected the winner in the Talent Category of the 2020 University Economic Development Association (UEDA) Awards of Excellence.

Scales secured a grant to pay for the new program this May and the graduates' salaries through Innovate Indiana. "They each earned a good income for their engagement," Scales said. "The program worked well."

He hopes to expand next year to add a minimum of two students a piece from all of the Indiana University campuses.

Supplied Photo:  The BOSS experience in the Historic Depot District
The BOSS Experience travels to Richmond's Historic Depot District to explore local entrepreneur-owned shops. Left to right: Reggie Reuss, Jessica Maupin, Garrett Silcott, and Colton Toms (front) Dailen Troutman, Joao de Lima and Colt Meyer.

BOSS is an acronym for Business Opportunities for Self Starters.

The original two-week program was designed to introduce local high school students to economics and entrepreneurship and teach them how to produce a business plan.

It was planned to run two years – but Scales kept getting grants to continue it. It now is an example of its own entrepreneurial successes.

The pioneering program is designed for those who have gained an undergraduate degree in the last three years.

The students in the BOSS Experience visited places such as Henny Penny, Color-Box, Warm Glow Candles, Jo Ann's Cafe and PeaK Nutrition, one of the newest storefronts to open in the Historic Richmond Depot District.

"They all started as entrepreneurs," said Scales, who noted that the seeds of Henny Penny were sowed in a house in Eaton, Ohio. The company now has nearly 5,000 employees worldwide in the manufacturing of food-service equipment.

"I think a lot of eyes were opened," Scales said.

Supplied Photo:  The BOSS Experience visits Paint the Towne in Richmond's Historic Depot District.
The BOSS Experience visits Paint the Towne in Richmond's Historic Depot District.

Many on campus may not be aware of the successful businesses that started here with dreams and initial product lines that started in garages and kitchens. "It opened my eyes to how much there is in Richmond," said Reuss, who had never visited any of the companies before.

Troutman said he enjoyed learning about the backgrounds of the businesses and their owners. He believes the knowledge will help him greatly. "That motivates you, having that connection," he said. "This (program) is kind of like starting your own business."

Troutman graduated with a general studies degree with a focus on marketing and graphic design. In the first step toward his dreams, he will begin working in the graphics department at Color-Box in Richmond this June.

Troutman wants to design clothing that is affordable to anyone and helps forge positive identities. "Know your worth, value and purpose in life," he said.

Toms is working an internship as a business analyst with the director of operations at Safety Zone in Richmond. He gained ideas by working with Today's Harvest in New Paris, Ohio, which promotes itself as "a one-stop" farm store for seasonal produce, donuts, flowers and a lot more. It also offers events and an annual corn maze.

He gained ideas about starting a business through BOSS Experience. "I didn't know about all the resources available. There are so many," Toms said.

Maupin said she uses social media to get the word out about her hand-painted Bibles. She buys them blank and then primes, paints and seals the covers that have Bible verses on them.

She believes they will prove popular for weddings, funerals and other special, personal events.

Reuss said he is hopeful that the program will last for a long time, like the original BOSS program.

"This is unlike any classes we had in college," said Reuss, who was recently named this year's Outstanding Student in Informatics. "All the things we learned would help anyone."

Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County Partners with Wayne Bank to Support Local Club

Posted June 8, 2022

The Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County is excited to announce a partnership with Wayne Bank to sustain the continued operation of their Western Wayne Unit. Wayne Bank has pledged to make a gift of $200,000 over the next four years. These funds will cover operating costs for the Club and replace the temporary funding provided by the Student Learning Recovery Grant Program. The Club will be renamed the Wayne Bank Boys & Girls Club when it reopens in August.

"We are so excited for our partnership with Wayne Bank," Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County Chief Executive Officer Alicia Painter said. "This Club began serving youth in August of 2021 and has been a wonderful success. We continue to see an increase in the number of youth we serve, and our staff members have done an exceptional job offering top-notch programming. This partnership will allow us to continue the impactful work we have begun."

The soon-to-be named Wayne Bank Boys & Girls Club has seen an outpouring of community support for its mission. In the single year since it's opening, the Club has recruited 140 active memberships. The Club offers the same afterschool programming focused on academic success, healthy lifestyles, and good character and citizenship that are the hallmark of Boys & Girls Clubs across the county with additional emphasis on STEAM and other academic programs.

The Wayne Bank Boys & Girls Club is "a spectacular gain," Wayne Bank Chief Executive Officer Mike Gaddis said, making the community more attractive for young families, especially those where parents can't be home when school is dismissed.

"We want to make sure the Boys & Girls Club can be sustained," Gaddis emphasized. "Youth is obviously our future, so much of our effort must be on trying to retain the youth and keeping them here. Walk around Cambridge City: the streets are nice, businesses are full, there are good people, so we want to help where we can."

Life-long Western Wayne resident and Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County Director of Resource Development & Special Events Sarah Roddy agreed, "For years, the families of the Western Wayne area have struggled to find affordable childcare and safe places for their kids to go after school, but, thanks to partners like Wayne Bank, Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County is now able provide that space. While Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County are new to the area, Mike and his team's investment in our kids' future is just the most recent way they have supported the people of Western Wayne. They truly understand that a sense of belonging and commitment to community are staples of the Western Wayne area."

"Great things will come from this partnership with Wayne Bank and the Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County," Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County Board President Tracie Robinson added. "The potential to serve the families in the Western Wayne Area has certainly been a goal of all involved. The programs offered to the kids will have a lasting impact on their lives and help them grow into great young adults who will be the future leaders in the surrounding community."

Additional naming opportunities are still available within the Wayne Bank Boys & Girls Club. Those include the gamesroom, zen den, STEAM room, and gym. Contact Sarah Roddy at sroddy@bgcrichmond.org or call (765) 962-6922 if you are interested in a naming opportunity.

The mission of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County is "to enable all young people, especially those who need us most, to reach their full potential as productive, caring, and responsible citizens." Members of the Club, ages 6-18, have access to dedicated, trained professionals who provide guidance in adopting healthy lifestyles and pursuing educational objectives. Currently, the Club serves over 2,000 youth at five locations: the Jeffers, McDaniel, First Bank, Wayne Bank, and Hagerstown units and during the summer at their 168-acre Camp Guy located on the Whitewater River. Since 1957, the Club has been striving to equip young people with the skills they need to succeed in life. For more information, visit www.bgcrichmond.org.

Hagerstown Senior Is First Recipient of New Scholarship Honoring Culberson Family

Posted June 6, 2022

Supplied Photo:  Reid Health Vice President Jason Troutwine and Ryan Williams present Hannah Tracy with the Culberson Family & Reid Health Scholarship A future first-generation college student with plans to pursue a career in nursing is the first recipient of a new scholarship that honors a Hagerstown family's five decades of service to the community.

Hannah Tracy was presented with the Culberson Family & Reid Health Scholarship during Hagerstown High School's Honors Program on Thursday night. The award is a one-year scholarship of $1,000 to a graduating Hagerstown student who intends to seek a degree or certificate in healthcare, emergency services, or mortuary science.

The announcement was made by a pair of Reid Health staff members, Vice President Jason Troutwine and Director of EMS, Forensics, and Trauma Services Ryan Williams, himself a Hagerstown alum.

Tracy plans to pursue a career in nursing at IUPUI and eventually continue to graduate school to become a pediatric nurse practitioner. She's a member of the National Honor Society who served in student government throughout high school, was a student-athlete, and finished near the top of her class academically.

In her application essay, Tracy said an internship at a local health facility showed her the difference she can make in others' lives.

"My mom was in the nursing field," Tracy said. "When I was able to job shadow at a pediatric office during high school, I just fell in love with it."

"This scholarship is a celebration of the legacy of Rick and his family. What better way to honor their many years of service than to help young people follow in their footsteps by pursuing careers in healthcare, particularly as nurses and EMTs." -- Craig Kinyon, Reid Health President/CEO

The scholarship carries the name of the family that operated Culberson Ambulance Service in the Hagerstown area for more than 50 years. Owner Rick Culberson recently retired, and service transitioned to Reid Health EMS at the beginning of this year.

The Culberson family was contacted and advised of the new scholarship. They were very pleased to know of the honor and how it will create opportunities for Hagerstown students in the future.

Reid officials worked with the Wayne County Foundation to establish the endowed scholarship in honor of Culberson and his family's many years of dedication to the community.

"We are pleased to play a small role in honoring the Culberson family," said Rebecca Gilliam, Executive Director of the Wayne County Foundation. "The scholarship will have a long-term impact in Wayne County by supporting Hagerstown students, like Hannah, with their career goals."

"This scholarship is a celebration of the legacy of Rick and his family," said Craig Kinyon, Reid Health President/CEO. "What better way to honor their many years of service than to help young people follow in their footsteps by pursuing careers in healthcare, particularly as nurses and EMTs."

Girls, Inc. to Host "Golf Fore Girl's Futures" on July 7 and 8

Posted June 2, 2022

Illustration: Alice in Wonderland with Flamingo Golf ClubGirls Inc. of Wayne County, along with our generous Title Sponsor, 3 Rivers Credit Union will be hosting two days of golf fun on Thursday, July 7, and Friday, July 8 at the Liberty Country Club Golf Course.

Join us on Thursday, July 7, as we "Golf Fore Girl's Futures" during our traditional golf outing featuring team prizes, food, mulligans, team mulligans, skins, and raffles. Please sign up for your group of four and join us for registration at 8:00 AM. Tee times begin at 9:00 AM.

If golfing isn't exactly your thing but you want to join in the fun, please join us on Friday, July 8th, at 4:00 PM for an evening for all of the non-golfers out there!

Leave your clubs at home, grab a group of friends and follow us down the rabbit hole while you play in our Goofy Golf Tournament. Participants on July 8 are strongly encouraged to create team shirts or outfits for a chance to win the "Team Spirit" award.

Be prepared to have some fun while you play a goofy game at each hole. There will be raffles, 50/50 drawings, team prizes, food, drinks, and fun, all while raising money to support the Girls Inc. mission to inspire all girls to be Strong, Smart, and Bold!

Team Registration Form | Goofy Golf Registration Form | Golf Sponsorship Form

Paint the Towne to Host Monthly 'Memory Café'

Posted June 2, 2022

Paint the Towne, in partnership with Dementia Friends Indiana and LifeStream Services, is rebooting their Memory Café on the first Monday of the month from 11:00am to 12:00pm beginning June 6 at their location at 411 North 8th St., Richmond, IN 47374.

People living with dementia and their caregivers are invited to a guided watercolor painting class that allows the individual to work at their own pace. Individuals are encouraged to engage in conversation while painting, if they wish. Memory Cafés offer those living with dementia a break from their normal routine as well as an opportunity to socialize and connect with others who are in a similar situation. LifeStream is proud to sponsor the Paint the Towne Memory Café, so participants may enjoy activities at no fee.

LifeStream is East Central Indiana's Dementia Friends Administrator. Those who are interested in learning more or becoming a Dementia Friend can attend the Dementia Friends Information Session held on the second Tuesday of the month from 1:00pm to 2:00pm via Zoom. Register for an upcoming session at dementiafriendsindiana.org/events-calendar/ Learn more or become a Dementia Friend online by visiting lifestreaminc.org/initiatives/#dementia or contact Hollyn Anderson, Caregiver Programs Coordinator, at handerson@lifestreaminc.org or (765) 425-8472.

Dementia Friends Indiana initiative is an outreach of Dementia Friendly America. The initiative seeks to educate communities about dementia, break down the stigma surrounding dementia, and implement practical changes that make life easier to navigate for those with dementia and for their loved ones.

Story: The Narrative Art of Alan Larkin

Posted June 1, 2022

We invite you to the reception and artist talk on:
Reception: Saturday June 11, 1 - 3PM
Artist Talk: 1:30PM

RAM is excited to host an exhibit by former IU South Bend Professor, Alan Larkin in June and July of 2022! The exhibit features paintings and etchings, including several brand new canvases prepared specifically for the RAM show. The exhibit will be on display in the Paul and Pat Lingle Gallery and the Patricia Quigg Lakoff Gallery.

Larkin received his BA in art from Carleton College in Northfield Minnesota in 1975 and his MFA in printmaking from the Pennsylvania State University in 1977. Though recently retired, he taught drawing and printmaking for almost forty years at Indiana University South Bend. He has won many prizes in regional, national and international competitions for his artwork, including the prestigious Founder's Award in the 2016 Pastel 100 Competition sponsored by the Pastel Journal and the Best of Show Award at the 75th and 91st Annual Hoosier Salon Exhibition in Indianapolis. His works are in numerous private collections including the corporate collections of Pillsbury, NIPSCO, and Lincoln Life Insurance Companies.

Supplied Image: An Interruption: Oil on Canvas, 30" x 40"

Supplied Image:  The Flower Arrangment, Oil on Canvas, 30" x 40"

June's Medical Monday Event Will Focus on Men's Health

Posted June 1, 2022

A guest panel will talk about various aspects of men's health during Reid Health's Medical Monday event in June, a celebration of national Men's Health Month.

On June 13, "Generational Health: An Open Discussion" will take place at 1 p.m. at Central United Methodist Church, 1425 E. Main St. in Richmond. The panel will be led by Reid Health Wellness Director Tajuan Stoker and will include Mark Broeker from Neighborhood Health Center, Richmond Mayor Dave Snow, Doug Macias from Natco Credit Union, and cancer survivors Eric Marsh of Whitewater Community Television and JoeVan Brown.

Panelists will share their personal health journeys and talk about the importance of regular screenings, annual appointments, and establishing stronger bonds with a primary care physician.

Medical Monday is free to attend. To register, call Sharrie Harlin Davis at (765) 983-3000, ext. 4676. Masks are required.

Medical Monday is supported by Reid Health Community Benefit. Harlin Davis started the event when she was working for the Minority Health Coalition and maintained it after joining Reid Health. The event has a loyal following, averaging 40 to 50 guests each month to learn about various health issues, community programs, and health screenings.

Unity Promotes Community! Townsend Community Center Annual Honors & Awards Dinner

Posted June 1, 2022

Supplied Flyer:  Townsend Center Annual Dinner

Townsend Community Center, Inc. will host it's annual honors and awards dinner on Saturday, June 18, 2022 at the Starr-Gennett Building, 101 South 1st Street, Richmond, Indiana.

Dinner and Awards will begin at 5:00 p.m. with a dance from 7 to 11 pm. Tickets are $40.

Debra Edelman and Bruce Daggy Inducted into the Indiana Boys & Girls Clubs Hall of Fame

Posted June 1, 2022

Supplied Photo:  Boys & Girls Club Honorees

The Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County is proud to announce that Board of Trustees Chair Debra Edelman and Ex Officio Executive Director Bruce Daggy have been inducted into the Indiana Boys & Girls Clubs Hall of Fame for Classes 2020 and 2021, respectively. The

Hall of Fame honors individuals who have provided exceptional service to a Boys & Girls Club in Indiana.

Edelman has a long history of service and leadership to the Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County. For many years Edelman and her husband Jack both served the Club in official capacities. Edelman joined the Board of Trustees in 2006 and has served as the President since 2010. Her leadership and her philanthropy have been tremendous, and as a result of her support of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County, Edelman is a Heritage Club member, a Jeremiah Milbank Society member, a Life-time Giving Society member, and has been a Corporate Legacy Sponsor and a Leadership Sponsor. She received the Earl & Kathryn Mayer Award in 2012 and the Women & Youth Award in 2019. As President of the Board of Trustees, Edelman oversaw the Club's Focused on the Future campaign which grew their endowment from $750,000 in 2013 to its current value of over $2.5 million.

Daggy had a long 40-year career within the Boys & Girls Clubs movement, serving as a Program and Unit Director in Michigan Clubs and then for 28 years as the Executive Director of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County before his retirement last year. Daggy has also been very active at the state, regional and national levels of the Boys & Girls Clubs of America serving on numerous committees and task forces and mentoring five former Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County staff members who later became executive directors at Boys & Girls Clubs across the country. He continues to serve the Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County in his retirement by serving on several committees and task forces.

"We are honored to have Debra Edelman & Bruce Daggy inducted into the Indiana Boys & Girls Clubs Hall of Fame," BGCWC Chief Executive Officer Alicia Painter remarked. "Both of these individuals have made a lasting impact on our organization and community. We are so grateful for the ongoing commitment both Debra and Bruce have made to our organization."

Edelman and Daggy were officially inducted into the Indiana Boys & Girls Clubs Hall of Fame at the Indiana Area Council Hall of Fame Dinner on April 14, 2022. Typically, the Indiana Boys & Girls Clubs Hall of Fame only inducts one member from an organization a year, with a maximum of 6 people inducted per class, but Edelman's 2020 induction was put on hold do to COVID restrictions. The Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County is honored to celebrate both Edelman and Daggy for the exceptional service they have provided their organization, youth, and community.

The mission of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County is "to enable all young people, especially those who need us most, to reach their full potential as productive, caring, and responsible citizens." Members of the Club, ages 6-18, have access to dedicated, trained professionals who provide guidance in adopting healthy lifestyles and pursuing educational objectives. Currently, the Club serves over 2,700 youth at five locations: the Jeffers, McDaniel, First Bank, Western Wayne, and Hagerstown units and during the summer at their 168-acre Camp Guy located on the Whitewater River. Since 1957, the Club has been striving to equip young people with the skills they need to succeed in life. For more information, visit www.bgcrichmond.org.

Rise in COVID-19 Cases May Be Higher Than Reported Due to At-Home Tests

Posted June 1, 2022

The spread of COVID-19 is on a steady rise again, both across the country and in Indiana.

But those reported cases might be underselling just how fast the virus is spreading these days, thanks to at-home testing.

"There is a lot of disease that flies under the radar now," said Thomas Huth, MD, Vice President of Medical Affairs for Reid Health. "At-home positive tests are not reported to local or state health departments, so those cases go unrecorded."

Many have chosen to skip the precautions that were prevalent in the pandemic's early days, such as masking when out in public. Now that more than two years have passed since the first local COVID-19 case, attitudes among residents have largely shifted to treating the disease in the same way many would the flu.

"We run the risk of trivializing it and saying, 'It's no big deal. It's just like getting the cold.'," Dr. Huth said.

But according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), hospitalizations and even deaths are now climbing again in the U.S. Those who remain unvaccinated, who aren't up to date on their boosters, or who are immunocompromised remain vulnerable to severe illness if they're infected.

"There is a lot of disease that flies under the radar now. At-home positive tests are not reported to local or state health departments, so those cases go unrecorded." -- Thomas Huth, MD, Vice President of Medical Affairs

Even those who are lucky enough to only have a mild case run the risk for developing "long COVID" symptoms that could last well beyond their initial illness.

FREE primary doses and boosters of the vaccine are available to all those eligible to receive them at the Reid Health Residency Clinic, 795 Sim Hodgin Parkway in Richmond.

Walk-ins are welcome from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday-Thursday and 8 a.m. to noon Friday. Appointments can be made for those hours by calling Reid's COVID-19 Hotline at (765) 965-4200. The hotline is open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. seven days a week.

Indiana residents can find other nearby vaccination sites and schedule a time at those locations by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.

Kids Ages 5-11 Now Eligible for COVID-19 Vaccine Booster Shots

Posted May 24, 2022

Children ages 5-11 can now receive a COVID-19 vaccine booster shot at the Reid Health Residency Clinic.

Federal health officials recently expanded eligibility for an initial booster dose as cases continue to rise across the country. The change means everyone ages 5 and older can now receive a booster 5 months after their primary series.

In the same announcement, officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) strengthened their stance on a second booster dose, now saying anyone at least 50 years old as well as those 12 and older who are immunocompromised should get a second booster.

"Over the past month, we have seen steady increases in cases, with a steep and substantial increase in hospitalizations for older Americans," the CDC said.

"While older Americans have the highest coverage of any age group of first booster doses, most older Americans received their last dose (either their primary series or their first booster dose) many months ago, leaving many who are vulnerable without the protection they may need to prevent severe disease, hospitalization, and death."

FREE primary doses and boosters of the vaccine are available to all those eligible to receive them at the Reid Health Residency Clinic, 795 Sim Hodgin Parkway in Richmond.

Walk-ins are welcome from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday-Thursday and 8 a.m. to noon Friday. Appointments can be made for those hours by calling Reid's COVID-19 Hotline at (765) 965-4200. The hotline is open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. seven days a week.

Indiana residents can find other nearby vaccination sites and schedule a time at those locations by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.

2021 East-Central Indiana Business Climate Survey Results Announced

Posted June 13, 2022

The Indiana University East Business and Economic Research Center (the BERC) of the School of Business and Economics surveyed regional businesses to research the business and economic pulse in East-Central Indiana.

The 2021 East-Central Indiana Business Survey was completed by businesses in September-October 2021.

This is the sixth year of the survey. The survey is conducted annually as usual in the fall of the reporting year, the findings and outlook derived from the responses of the business operators included in this report do not reflect all the impact of the pandemic on the seven-county region. Since the data was collected, many businesses' plans have been disrupted or changed due to the pandemic. The hope is that this report will still provide a baseline measurement of what area businesses had anticipated versus the actual challenging situation they are currently facing.

In this survey, seven East-Central Indiana counties were included to provide an overview of the business climate of the regional economy.

The survey was sent to more than 1,000 local business operators in Fayette, Franklin, Henry, Randolph, Rush, Union, and Wayne counties across a wide spectrum of industries including professional services, manufacturing, health care, information technology, retail trade, and banking and financial services. There were 146 participating businesses who completed the survey. Half of the surveyed businesses have operated in their counties for more than 20 years.

The survey was broken down into sections including demographics, performance, expectations, concerns and forecasts for the coming year. A few of the survey highlights indicated that more than half of the businesses in the region experienced an increase in production and business activity than in 2021, and less than one-fifth reported a reduction. Twenty-one percent of the surveys indicated an increase in employment.

When considering expectations for 2022, over 90% of survey participants expect their firms to either increase or maintain the same level of production and business activity. Over half of the businesses anticipate hiring the same number of employees, and more than one third of them expect to add more employees in 2022.

The survey report is available on the BERC website at iue.edu/business/berc/.

This project would not have been successful without the support and contribution of the Fayette County Chamber of Commerce, the Economic Development Group of Connersville and Fayette County, the Franklin County Chamber of Commerce, Experience Franklin County, Indiana, Inc., the Franklin County Convention, Recreation and Visitors Commission, and Franklin County Welcome Center, the New Castle-Henry County Chamber of Commerce, the New Castle-Henry County Economic Development Corporation, Randolph County United, the Rush County Chamber of Commerce, the Union County Development Corporation, the Wayne County Area Chamber of Commerce and the Economic Development Corporation of Wayne County.

In addition, BERC's successful application for the Regional Economic Development (RED) Fund from the Indiana University Council for Regional Engagement and Economic Development (CREED) has also enabled the printing of a significant number of copies of this report for distribution to the local offices of economic development efforts in each of the participating counties covered in the report.

During the spring 2022 semester, BERC held a student cover design contest for the 2021 East-Central Indiana Business Survey Report. Gabriel Jones, a fine arts major, was the winner. Deziree Shafer, a recent graduate with her degree in communication studies, and Tianna Hampton, a fine arts major, were finalists. All are from Richmond.

For more information on the East-Central Indiana Business Survey Report, contact the Director of the Business and Economic Research Center and Associate Professor of Finance, Oi Lin (Irene) Cheung, Ph.D., at (765) 973-8497.

Higher Learning Commission Reaffirms IU East's Accreditation

Posted June 13, 2022

Indiana University East received continued accreditation by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools (HLC).

IU East hosted a team of peer reviewers from the commission as part of the accreditation process. The team visited February 28 to March 1, 2022, to meet with administrators, faculty, staff, students, and community members.

Prior to the team visit, IU East underwent a two-year process of self-study to address commission requirements and criteria. Findings from the study were analyzed and compiled into a self-study document and submitted to the commission prior to the campus visit. The two-phase process of accreditation provided an opportunity for critical self-analysis followed by consultation and advice from persons from other institutions, leading to ongoing improvement in quality including mission and integrity; preparing for the future; student learning and effective teaching; acquisition, discovery, and application of knowledge; and engagement and service.

Following the campus visit, the team recommended to the HLC that IU East receive a renewal of its accreditation. The commission approved the continued accreditation during its meeting May 24. IU East was notified of the accreditation June 1. The HLC's next comprehensive evaluation of IU East will take place in 2031-32.

Chancellor Kathy Girten said the continued accreditation for the campus is an outstanding achievement and a demonstration of the commitment the university has to the region and beyond.

"To achieve this accomplishment is a significant achievement, and I am very proud of our campus for meeting this goal," Girten said. "IU East has had a strong focus on increasing enrollment and improving student success. This is the core of what we do— educate students and ensure they receive their degrees and are prepared for the future world of work."

IU East has been an accredited institution of higher education since 1971. The HLC is an independent corporation, and one of six regional institutional accreditors that accredits degree-granting post-secondary educational institutions in the United States.

Michelle Malott, interim deputy chancellor and executive vice chancellor for Academic Affairs, said "student success is one of our top priorities at IU East. Reaffirming our accreditation solidifies our mission as a campus and the standards that we hold ourselves to as a leader in online programs and our traditional on campus programs."

Girten said IU East continues to meet the criteria for accreditation, including goals and initiatives accomplished within the campus' strategic plan, such as:

  • Significant and consistent improvement in graduation rates
  • Success in dramatically lowering student loan default rates
  • Reduction in the amount of student debt upon graduation
  • Increase in the number of IU degrees awarded at IU East
  • Increase in student diversity
  • Development of new degree programs, including collaborative online programs
  • Continued improvements on campus including construction of the Student Events Center and the Arts Annex and renovations to Whitewater Hall Lobby, Vivian Auditorium, and other areas on campus.
  • Expansion of athletics, including its most recent co-ed varsity esports team in fall 2021
  • Development of new degree programs, including collaborative IU online programs
  • AACSB accreditation for the IU East School of Business and Economics
  • Successful completion of the IU Bicentennial Campaign, exceeding the campus goals of $7 million
  • Increased meaningful community presence and engagement

Accreditation signifies that the campus' academic programs meet nationally recognized standards and that students earning degrees are well prepared. In addition, institutions that are accredited are also eligible to receive federal funds for student financial aid, a very important source of support for students.

Girten said IU East is continuously looking toward the future and planning for the possibilities ahead. She added that the current strategic plan has six focus areas: Enrollment & student success; Human Resources; Academic Planning; Diversity, Equity & Inclusion; Community Engagement; and Sustainability & Environmental Resiliency.

Senior Adult Ministry June Meeting

Posted June 15, 2022

Discover how to prevent falls and what exercises will help us retain our vitality as we greet the golden years. Professionals in Medical Fitness at Reid will present demonstrations and lead members through easy exercises at the June meeting of the Senior Adult Ministry.

The meeting will start at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, June 28, at First United Methodist Church, 318 National Road West, Richmond. Please bring a friend and a snack to share if you can.

Future monthly programs for 2022 include a pitch-in picnic at Veteran's Park, Everyone's birthday, and Beautiful candles: how it's done. Meetings are held the last Tuesday of each month.

Senior Adult Ministry is an active group of seniors over 50 years old open to all regardless of religious affiliation. The group is guided by Pastor Judi Marshall, Clara Bulmer and Beverly Kirby. These three women actively share their gifts of ministry, hospitality and creativity in planning and organizing the monthly meetings.

For further information, call 765-962-4357 or check our facebook page.

Not Sure if You're Eligible for a COVID-19 Vaccine Booster Shot? Check Out This CDC Tool

Posted June 14, 2022

It can be a little confusing trying to keep track of whether you're eligible for a COVID-19 vaccine booster shot or how many boosters you should get. The answers depend on which vaccine you initially received, how old you are, and other factors.

To help, staff at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have created a simple tool you can use.

Through a series of questions about your age (or your child's), whether you have a weakened immune system, which vaccine you received for your initial series, and whether you've had any boosters so far, the tool will tell you if you're up to date or if you should make a point of getting another shot.

If you haven't been vaccinated or if you're ready for a booster, Reid Health offers FREE primary doses and booster shots of the vaccine at the Reid Health Residency Clinic, 795 Sim Hodgin Parkway in Richmond.

Walk-ins are welcome from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday-Thursday and 8 a.m. to noon Friday. Appointments can be made for those hours by calling Reid's COVID-19 Hotline at (765) 965-4200. The hotline is open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. seven days a week.

Indiana residents can find other nearby vaccination sites and schedule a time at those locations by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.

Announcing the 2022 4th Street Fair

Posted June 13, 2022

Logo: 4th Street FairWe are excited to announce the 41s annual 4th Street Fair presented by Ivy Tech Richmond and Senior Opportunities Services (SOS).

The 4th Street Fair is an annual event that has been held on South 4th Street in Richmond, Indiana for the past 41 years. This beloved community event is also a fundraiser for SOS, a not for profit organization serving the needs of older adults in Wayne County.

This year's fair will take place from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. on Saturday, October 1st and Sunday, October 2nd, 2022 on South 4th Street in the Old Richmond Historic District.

This family event will feature FREE live music and entertainment on both days of the fair along with a unique variety of food trucks, arts and crafts vendors, and kid-friendly activities. Last year's fair was a huge success and we're looking forward to even more this year with new and returning vendors, more activities, and additional seating areas for attendees to not only connect with friends, but to also relax, eat, and take in the beautiful historic surroundings.

"The Old Richmond Historic District is very important to the history of our town, not only the architecture but the people who lived in this charming neighborhood. The 4th Street Fair helps tell the story and brings people to this wonderful hidden gem in celebration of fall with a variety of fun and festivities", said Michele Thompson, one of the fair organizers.

Come out on October 1-2, 2022 to explore the stunning architecture of the Old Richmond Historic District, shop with our arts and crafts vendors, enjoy the fun activities, and feast on the delicious offerings provided by our food vendors. This is a rain or shine event.

Sponsorship and Volunteer information can be found on our website.

Sponsorship Details: https://www.4thStreetFair.com/sponsorhip

Volunteer Sign-up: https://www.4thstreetfair.com/volunteers

For more details visit 4thStreetFair.com or call 765-220-1124.

Richmond Community Orchestra Presents an Outdoor Summer Concert at Glen Miller Park

Posted June 13, 2022

Supplied Flyer: RCO June 18 Concert

Join RCO for our free Summer Concert, Sat. June 18th, 5:00pm at the Glen Miller Park Roosevelt Hill Bandshell. Free admission. Bring your lawn chairs.

Grants Available for Field Trips to State Parks, Lakes

Posted May 23, 2022

Educators interested in taking K-12 students on field trips to an Indiana state park or state-managed lake in the 2022-2023 school year can receive financial help through the Indiana Natural Resources Foundation (INRF).

Grants from the Discover the Outdoors fund are available for public, private, parochial, or home-school educators, according to INRF executive director Jody Kress.

"The Foundation's mission is to celebrate and preserve Indiana's natural legacy," Kress said. "This grant gives children an adventure that showcases some of Indiana's natural and cultural treasures and teaches the importance of protecting and preserving them for everyone to enjoy."

Since the grant program's inception in 2013, a total of 153 grants have been awarded, providing the opportunity for more than 17,000 students to visit state parks at less cost to the schools and students.

Indiana has 24 state parks, eight state-managed lakes, two state recreation areas, and two off-road state recreation areas eligible for field trip funding that will engage students in learning about Indiana's fish, forest, wildlife, natural habitats, conservation, and outdoor recreation opportunities.

"These trips help children understand how previous generations viewed the significance of Indiana's natural and cultural resources, and at the same time let them make great memories that they will carry into adulthood," said Ginger Murphy, deputy director for stewardship for DNR State Parks.

The maximum grant award is $250 per application.

Applications are accepted from May 1-June 30 prior to the school year for which the grant is requested. Applications must be postmarked no later than June 30.

Applicants will be notified by Sept. 1 regarding potential grant awards. The grant application is at on.IN.gov/state-park-group-programs. Read more about the impact this grant has had at indiananrf.org/the-inrf-difference/education.

A video explaining the program is at youtu.be/uC4QjhsBLO8

The INRF is accepting donations to the fund from individuals, businesses, and anyone else who supports the idea of getting kids outdoors. The fund was established in memory of Tom Huck, a longtime DNR employee who was an ardent supporter of outdoor experiences for children.

For further information, including how to donate, email discoveroutdoorsgrants@dnr.IN.gov.

To view more DNR news releases, please see dnr.IN.gov.

Wayne County Foundation Awards $146,015 Through Grant Cycle I

Posted May 23, 2022

The Wayne County Foundation is pleased to announce that eighteen different local organizations have been awarded a total of $146,015 through its Grant Cycle I. The funding is to support local programs or projects to enhance the spirit of the community and improve the quality of life across Wayne County.

Grant Cycle I is the first of three cycles offered by the Foundation throughout 2022 to support programs and projects for local nonprofit organizations.

'Here in Wayne County, we are fortunate to have so many nonprofit organizations doing passionate work and meeting the critical needs of our community,' said Foundation Executive Director Rebecca Gilliam. 'The Foundation is excited to come alongside these organizations and play even a small role in their work and successes.'

The Wayne County Foundation's grantmaking is made possible by income from unrestricted and endowed field-of-interest funds. Below is the list of the grant awards approved by the Foundation's Board of Directors at their May meeting.

Achieva Resources Corporation, Inc. $5,000 To support the EXCEL Program; offer developmental screenings for toddlers & more
Amigos the Richmond Latino Center $10,000 To support their English language classes
Brighter Path Inc. $10,000 To offer scholarships for their equine programs
Circle U Help Center, Inc. $5,000 To expand on an in-school food program with Communities in Schools
Crestdale Elementary PTO $5,000 To update the school's 30-year-old playground with new equipment
Hagerstown Nettle Creek Players $10,000 To support performances and the Young Actor's Workshop
HELP the Animals, Inc. $10,000 To install a new cooling system in their main kennel room
Indiana Women in Need Foundation $2,800 To assist women and families dealing with the financial effects of breast cancer
Junior Achievement of Eastern Indiana $10,000 For the GenJA program, which promotes financial literacy among K-12 students
Morrisson-Reeves Library $11,400 To support the StoryWalk program, which promotes children's literacy
Neighborhood Health Center $14,500 To help with a Spanish-speaking medical interpreter
Richmond Civic Theatre, Inc. $15,000 To support improvements around the facility including to fly, sound, microphone, etc.
Richmond Symphony Orchestra $10,000 To support the Sunset Series and other free community programming
Sunrise Therapeutic Riding Center $5,000 To support their scholarship program for students
Wayne County Cardinal Greenway $15,000 To purchase a new vehicle to assist with trail maintenance
Wayne County Historical Museum $5,000 To assist with the implementation of a new Gennett Records exhibit
Women's Workshop Richmond $1,100 To support workshops with various groups around the community
Wood Block Press, Inc. $1,215 To develop learning opportunities and purchase new trees for the community orchard

Downtown Richmond Main Street to be Closed for Work on U.S. 27 NB

Posted May 18, 2022

Supplied Map: Downtown Richmond IN Map

Indiana Department of Transportation contractor Milestone will close Main Street in downtown Richmond between 8th and 9th Street starting on Wednesday, May 17, for work on U.S. 27.

Construction will last approximately two weeks for work on storm water pipe installation. Though this area will be closed to vehicles and parking, pedestrian access will still be open to local businesses.

INDOT reminds drivers to consider worker safety and slow down, use extra caution and drive distraction-free when travelling in and around all work zones.

Stay Informed

Motorists in East Central Indiana can monitor road closures, road conditions, and traffic alerts any time via:

Facebook: facebook.com/INDOTEast

Twitter: @INDOTEast

TrafficWise: 511in.org

Mobile App: iTunes App Store and the Google Play store for Android

Historic Cars Return for Homecoming Event

Posted May 17, 2022

Supplied Graphic:  Model T HomecomingThe Model T Homecoming event returns to Richmond's Historic Depot District on Saturday, June 4, from 8 a.m. – 3 p.m. The event, hosted by the Model T Ford Club of America (MTFCA), will bring together historic car enthusiasts from across the nation to benefit the Model T Museum. The event is free and open to the public.

The event will be held at the Model T Museum and will feature a car show of pre-1945 vehicles, a swap meet, Model T-related educational seminars and several family-friendly activities. Participation in the car show is free and open to historic car owners, no pre-registration required. Swap meet vendor spaces are available for $15 each through the MTFCA store. Registration deadline is May 23.

According to Chad Budreau, coordinator of the car show, Homecoming allows members of the historic car community to come together, share tips and talk about their vintage cars.

"While the Model Ts are at the heart of the hobby, it's the members that give it a life and a soul," said Budreau. "The car show is a great tool to attract the public to the event to talk to our members and learn more about the hobby."

Educational seminars will be led by Mark Atkins from 10 – 11 a.m. in the museum Vintage Garage and George Akin from 11 a.m. – 12 p.m. at the Paint the Towne meeting room and Scot Rosenthal from 1 – 2 in the main Museum building. Students from Dance Techniques with Cheryl DeLucio dance studio will lead attendees in 1920s dance moves during Dancing with the Cars at 1:30. Additional mechanical demonstrations and the quick assembly of a Model T will take place throughout the day.

"Another 'must see' this year is a rare, original 1912 Towncar, owned by Jim Finney. Jim is allowing us to showcase this car during Homecoming and we are thrilled to be able to share it with the public,' added MTFCA Executive Director, Rachel Hughes. "This one-of-a-kind Model T is currently undergoing some restoration work by Scot Rosenthal and he will be bringing it to the event. It's a chance to see a truly unique Model T outside a Museum setting."

Freshly made ice cream will be on sale from Ullery's Ice Cream and families can request to ride in a Model T by donation.

The Model T Museum will be open for the event from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Admission is by donation. The Model T Museum is located in the Historic Depot District in Richmond, Ind., at 309 N. 8 th St.

For more information, please call (765) 488-0026 or visit mtfca.com/museum.

Senior Adult Ministry May Meeting

Posted May 18, 2022

Bingo lovers plan to attend the Senior Adult Ministry's next meeting to play Bible Bingo. Come and enjoy a night filled with prizes, fellowship and snacks. The meeting will start at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, May 31, at First United Methodist Church, 318 National Road West, Richmond. Please bring a friend and bring a snack to share if you can.

Future monthly programs for 2022 include a pitch-in picnic at Veteran's Park, Everyone's birthday, Beautiful candles: how it's done, and Gentle Exercise for Seniors.

Senior Adult Ministry is an active group of seniors over 50 years old open to all regardless of religious affiliation. The group is guided by Pastor Judi Marshall, Clara Bulmer and Beverly Kirby. These three women actively share their gifts of ministry, hospitality and creativity in planning and organizing the monthly meetings.

For further information, call 765-962-4357 or check our facebook page.

COVID-19: 1 Million Deaths in the U.S. and Counting

Posted May 17, 2022

This week marks a tragic milestone in the COVID-19 pandemic: 1 million deaths caused by infections from the virus.

Once a number becomes that large, it can be hard to fully grasp its enormity. To put in into context, over the past two-plus years, we've lost the equivalent of the entire population of Indianapolis and Dayton combined.

Although the pace of spread locally has been low for weeks now, the pandemic continues and cases are on the rise across the country -- according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) -- as well as Indiana.

"Sadly, a number of these deaths were preventable through vaccination, but too few have protected themselves and their loved ones by getting the shots," said Thomas Huth, MD, Vice President of Medical Affairs for Reid Health. "The virus is still spreading, and many people remain vulnerable, either because of other health conditions or their lack of vaccination.

"It is critical that everyone not only be fully vaccinated but remain up to date with whatever booster shots for which they're eligible."

"Sadly, a number of these deaths were preventable through vaccination, but too few have protected themselves and their loved ones by getting the shots. The virus is still spreading, and many people remain vulnerable, either because of other health conditions or their lack of vaccination." -- Thomas Huth, MD, Vice President of Medical Affairs

Everyone ages 5 and older can receive a primary series of the COVID-19 vaccines. Those 12 years and older can get an initial booster shot, and some -- those 50 and older or anyone at least 12 years old who is immunocompromised -- are eligible for a second booster.

FREE primary doses and boosters of the vaccine are available at the Reid Health Residency Clinic, 795 Sim Hodgin Parkway in Richmond.

Walk-ins are welcome from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday-Thursday and 8 a.m. to noon Friday. Appointments can be made for those hours by calling Reid's COVID-19 Hotline at (765) 965-4200. The hotline is open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. seven days a week.

Indiana residents can find other nearby vaccination sites and schedule a time at those locations by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.

Reid Community Outreach, Boys & Girls Clubs Partner for Community Resource Fair

Posted May 16, 2022

More than 20 local organizations and employers are expected to be on hand for a community resource fair next week in Richmond, a joint project from Reid Community Outreach and the Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County.

The event will take place 4-6 p.m. on Tuesday, May 17 at the First Bank Club at the Rev. James M. Townsend Memorial Building, 855 N. 12th St. in Richmond. Plans are to have the fair in the club's parking lot unless weather conditions require a move indoors to the gym.

Representatives from Reid Health's Human Resources and Wellness departments will be among the community organizations and businesses attending the fair. Job seekers who attend will find information about available openings.

Visitors will be treated to free food and giveaways, including gift card drawings.

Community members are invited to stop by, get information about local organizations, visit with friends and neighbors, and get a look at the club's new Little Free Library as well as the new community food pantry at the facility, a project from Mt. Olive Baptist Church.

Staff from the Wayne County Area Chamber of Commerce will conduct a ribbon-cutting ceremony with Richmond Mayor Dave Snow at 5 p.m. during the event.

The community resource fair, Little Free Library, and free community pantry placement projects are being made possible by Forward Wayne County's Neighborhood Involvement and Community Engagement (NICE) Grant. Funds were provided by Lilly Endowment Inc.

Community Benefit Awards $127,000 in Grants to Address Mental Health, Substance Misuse

Posted May 16, 2022

In the first of two grant cycles this year, Reid Health Community Benefit is giving more than $127,000 to 21 local organizations.

The first cycle of 2022 was focused on Mental Health & Substance Misuse, with $127,513 being awarded to a mix of nonprofits and schools.

Requests were evaluated based on their ability to impact the number of adults who smoke, the death rate due to drug poisoning, mothers who smoke during pregnancy, age-adjusted death rate due to suicide, child abuse rate, non-fatal emergency visits due to opioid overdose, and poor mental health average number of days.

Applications for the second cycle -- Physical Activity, Nutrition, and Weight -- are open until May 24. Those will be evaluated based on their ability to impact access to exercise opportunities, adults age 20 and older who are obese, adults 20 and older who are sedentary, child food insecurity rate, and food insecurity rate.

The awards for the first cycle include:

  • $6,000 to A Better Way (formerly Genesis) to promote and expand the crisis hotline in this area.
  • $10,000 to Birth to Five for staffing support for the Healthy Families program.
  • $10,000 to Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County for Prevention Plus programming at the clubs and in schools.
  • $2,500 to Brighter Path to support scholarships for their equine therapy program for children and adults.
  • $5,000 to Children's Advocacy Center of Randolph County to support prevention programming for children and adults in Randolph County.
  • $10,000 to Family Services & Prevention Programming for half the purchase price of an LED sign for prevention messaging and to promote pro-social events.
  • $3,800 to Girls Inc. for staff training for Mental Health First Aid and Peer Helpers.
  • $5,000 to Independent Living Center for prefabricated, reusable ramps in Reid's service area.
  • $10,373 to JACY House for prevention programming for children and adults in six counties in Reid's service area.
  • $8,000 to Meridian Health Services to remove barriers associated with securing housing and transportation for active participants in the maternal treatment program known as The Nest.
  • $900 to Open Arms Ministries to provide four workshops related to mental health: Two focused on seniors, one for teens, and one for societal reentry after incarceration.
  • $5,000 to Preble Arts for monthly art workshops for first responders and healthcare workers as a form of art therapy.
  • $7,500 to Randolph County veteran's shelter The Journey Home to help the Veteran's Outreach Team in locating homeless veterans and providing them with services and support.
  • $6,410 to Randolph Eastern School Corp. to expand the Leader in Me program to high school students and teachers.
  • $532 to Starr Elementary for activities designed to provide mental health support for teachers and staff at the school.
  • $3,500 to Rose Hamilton Elementary to expand the Trust Based Relational Intervention curriculum and supplies for Centerville schools.
  • $1,250 to Senior Opportunity Services to support the homemaker program for seniors.
  • $12,748 to The Shepherd's Way (Cross Road Christian Recovery Center for Women) for a part-time case manager and the purchase of curriculum for women with a history of addiction and trauma.
  • $7,000 to Western Wayne Schools to expand the Trust Based Relational Intervention training, curriculum, and supplies for the elementary and middle schools.
  • $10,000 to Whole Family Community Initiative (House of Ruth) for counseling services for residents of House of Ruth and their families.
  • $2,000 to YMCA of Darke County for a wellness program for adult probation clients in Darke County called Physical Training for Change.

Community benefit is the basis of the tax-exempt status of not-for-profit hospitals. Community benefit is defined as programs or activities that improve access to health services, enhance public health, advance health knowledge through research and education, and/or relieve the burden of government to improve health.

In 2010, the Affordable Care Act added new requirements for tax-exempt hospitals in the areas of community health needs assessment (CHNA), implementation strategy, billing and collections, and reporting. In 2014, the IRS issued final rules implementing these requirements. The goals of these provisions are to ensure tax-exempt hospitals are meeting the health needs of their communities and to ensure greater transparency and accountability.

Grants, along with other specific outreach and requirements to meet Reid Health's not-for-profit status, have put more than $172 million back into the community in the past five years. A committee of Reid's governing board and community members reviews grant requests. The grants are awarded as part of the health system's efforts as a mission-driven, not-for-profit organization.

Singles Interaction, Inc.

Posted May 16, 2022

Supplied Newsletter: June 2022 Singles Interaction

If you are 21 years of age or better and single, divorced, widow or widower, Singles' Interaction invites you to join them on Friday nights. Come to the Eagles Lodge, 75 South 12th Street, Richmond (membership not required) and meet other single people in the Richmond area.

Reid's Patient Financial Services Office Open to Walk-Ins Once Again

Posted May 12, 2022

After limiting access because of the COVID-19 pandemic, Reid Health's Patient Financial Services office in downtown Richmond is once again welcoming walk-ins.

Visitors can come to the building at 600 E. Main St. to pay their bill, get help with billing questions, request a copy of their medical records, or seek financial assistance.

The location is open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.

As with all other Reid Health facilities, visitors to Patient Financial Services are required to wear a surgical mask that fully covers their nose and mouth to protect themselves, other visitors, and Reid staff from the virus that causes COVID-19.

Global Shortage of Contrast Agents Impacts Some Procedures at Reid Health

Posted May 12, 2022

Hospitals across the country -- including Reid Health -- are being impacted by a global shortage of intravenous contrast media dyes used for some radiology, cardiology, and surgery procedures to help better understand images taken of a patient's body.

COVID-19 related lockdowns in China have caused disruptions to production and distribution from GE Healthcare, leading to a nationwide dwindling supply of the materials.

In a press release issued by the American Hospital Association (AHA) yesterday, the organization recognized the supply shortage's effect on hospitals across the country.

"We are aware of this global shortage and have raised this issue with the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA)," said Nancy Foster, AHA's Vice President for Quality and Patient Safety Policy.

"It's a rapidly evolving situation, and we don't have a firm timetable for when new supplies will be available. As a result, we will ethically, equitably, and appropriately prioritize the utilization of short-supplied contrast agents for our patients." -- Thomas Huth, MD, Vice President of Medical Affairs

"While we have been told to expect normal production to resume late next month, hospitals are exploring various conservation strategies including the use of other imaging technologies, using other contrast agents, rationing contrast to ensure every available drop is used efficiently, and postponing some scans that can be postponed -- to give a few examples -- to continue to provide needed care."

Like many other hospitals, Reid Health has a limited amount of these contrast media dyes on hand and is taking steps to conserve and prioritize the supply so it is available for patients who might need the contrast for life-saving procedures. As a result, some non-emergent procedures that use contrast will be postponed.

"This is a global problem that is impacting many health systems in addition to Reid Health," said Thomas Huth, MD, Vice President of Medical Affairs for Reid Health. "It's a rapidly evolving situation, and we don't have a firm timetable for when new supplies will be available.

"As a result, we will ethically, equitably, and appropriately prioritize the utilization of short-supplied contrast agents for our patients."

Senior Adult Ministry's April 2022 Meeting

Posted May 12, 2022

Supplied Photo:  Senior Adult Ministry MeetingThe Sweet Sounds of Starr Valley, a dulcimer group led by Judi Marshall, entertained at the April meeting of Senior Adult Ministry. The next meeting will feature Bible Bingo and will be held at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, May 31, at First United Methodist Church, 318 National Road West, Richmond, IN.

What You Should Know About Long COVID

Posted May 10, 2022

Most people who catch the virus that causes COVID-19 feel better within a few days or a couple weeks, especially if they were vaccinated before they became infected. But for some, the effects of the illness can linger for months or even years. This is a condition known as "long COVID."

Although officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) continue to study long COVID, it's not yet been determined why the condition develops in some people and not others. But this we do know: Anyone who has been infected with the virus is at risk for experiencing long COVID, even if their case was mild or they originally had no symptoms at all.

Those who are unvaccinated also appear to be more likely to develop long COVID than those who get the shots but end up with a breakthrough infection, with one study finding people who are fully vaccinated were 49% less likely to experience the condition.

Anyone who has been infected with the virus is at risk for experiencing long COVID, even if their case was mild or they originally had no symptoms at all.

Symptoms of long COVID differ from person to person and can include:

  • Tiredness or fatigue that interferes with daily life
  • Symptoms that get worse after physical or mental effort
  • Fever
  • Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
  • Cough
  • Chest pain
  • Fast-beating heart
  • Difficulty thinking or concentrating
  • Headaches
  • Sleeping problems
  • Dizziness when you stand up
  • Pins-and-needles feelings
  • Changes in taste or smell
  • Depression or anxiety
  • Diarrhea
  • Stomach pain
  • Joint or muscle pain
  • Rash
  • Changes in menstrual cycles

According to the CDC, estimates for people experiencing long COVID vary, with about 13.3% having symptoms at least one month after infection and 2.5% at least three months after. More than 30% of those who were hospitalized with COVID-19 continue to feel its effects at least 6 months after they were infected.

The best way to protect yourself and others from long COVID is to get vaccinated and stay up to date with your shots. There is even evidence vaccination after developing long COVID could help reduce symptoms.

If you have long COVID symptoms, you should talk about them with your primary care provider. The CDC has a few tips to help prepare you for that conversation.

The best way to protect yourself and others from long COVID is to get vaccinated and stay up to date with your shots. There is even evidence vaccination after developing long COVID could help reduce symptoms.

FREE primary doses and boosters of the vaccine are available at the Reid Health Residency Clinic, 795 Sim Hodgin Parkway in Richmond.

Walk-ins are welcome from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday-Thursday and 8 a.m. to noon Friday. Appointments can be made for those hours by calling Reid's COVID-19 Hotline at (765) 965-4200. The hotline is open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. seven days a week.

Indiana residents can find other nearby vaccination sites and schedule a time at those locations by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.

10 Honored by Reid Health during National Nurses Week

Posted May 10, 2022

Supplied Photo:  The 2022 Nursing Excellence Award winners include (front row, from left) Kristin Wright, Emmi Newton, Courtney Rhodabarger, Amber Harris, (back row, from left) Joy Bowlin, Natalie Meyer, Chelsea Vogel, Bill Newton, LeAnne Stiver, and Lance Pence.

Reid Health is honoring 10 of its nurses this week for the 2022 Nursing Excellence Awards as part of National Nurses Week recognition.

The group has more than a hundred years of nursing experience total and represents a variety of departments across the health system, with each person chosen for the high level of care they provide to our communities, our patients, and their families.

"We make sure those who are honored really embody our mission and the values of excellence, empathy, integrity, and accountability," said Jared Dunlap, Director of Inpatient Nursing for Reid Health. "We want to make sure they are the examples, so everyone understands this is who we are at Reid."

The theme for this year's celebration -- "Rooted in strength" -- reflects the way the Reid team has worked together to persevere through the COVID-19 pandemic.

"The past two years have been tough," said Misti Foust-Cofield, Reid Health Vice President/Chief Nursing Officer. "I think as a profession and as a family of nurses, we have held hands and walked through this together, having the backs of one another. And I think that theme truly embodies the culture and the atmosphere that we want for our nursing team."

Joy Bowlin, NP-C, Richmond Cardiology Associates

Born in Louisville, Ky., Joy Bowlin now lives on a small farm in Losantville, Ind., with her best friend -- her husband, Roger -- where the couple raises Standardbred horses, Angus cattle, and "the best Australian shepherds."

Bowlin began her nursing career earning her LPN degee from Ivy Tech Community College and eventually obtaining her master's at Indiana University East. She joined Reid in 2005 and has been in her current position since 2018.

"I was inspired to go into medicine and nursing because I wanted to help people," Bowlin said. "My grandfather underwent cardiac surgery when he was very young, and he always talked about the medical staff who took care of him with such appreciation. He was able to live a long and happy life thanks to the care he received, and I wanted to be able to make that same kind of impact on other people's lives.

"Over the years, I've been able to help care for many patients, both as a nurse and a provider. I love it when I see them later and they feel comfortable with me because of the relationship we've formed. It makes me very happy to be able to meet them where they need it, in their good and bad times."

Amber Harris, RN, Emergency Services

Growing up, Amber Harris had an up-close look at what being a nurse is all about.

"My mom is a nurse, and I've always been very proud and inspired to follow in her footsteps," she said.

Harris lives in Eaton, Ohio -- not far from her birthplace in Xenia -- with her significant other, Derrick, and their daughter, Ryley.

Her nursing degree is from Sinclair Community College. She's been with Reid since 2014, working first in Psychiatry before becoming a Psychiatric Triage Nurse in Emergency Services.

"The most rewarding thing about being a nurse is being able to help people in their time of crisis and being able to make a difference in peoples' lives," Harris said.

Natalie Meyer, RN, Patient Continuum of Care

Natalie Meyer isn't done with her nursing education just yet. Having already received a bachelor's degree from Indiana University East, she'll soon be starting classes at the University of Cincinnati to become a women's health nurse practitioner.

"Working in healthcare is the only thing I could ever imagine myself doing," she said. "I've always been fascinated with science and the human body. I took every class possible regarding biomedical science in high school."

Meyer lives in Fountain City with her husband, Mike; their two children, Ethan and Ellie; and their dog, Rudy. She's been with Reid since 2013, with the past four years coming as a perinatal navigator.

"As a navigator, I get a very unique opportunity to build wonderful relationships with my patients throughout their pregnancies and postpartum periods," Meyer said. "The most rewarding thing is the growth I get to see in my patients -- overcoming significant struggles in their lives -- and just knowing we've made a difference."

Bill Newton, RN, Nursing Support

It was a bit of a different path that Bill Newton took to becoming a nurse.

"Helping my family study for nursing tests and exams really piqued an interest in me," he said. "Plus, I loved how working at Reid felt like a family atmosphere."

Newton has been a member of the Reid team since 2001. In that time, he's worked for a variety of departments, including Engineering, Security, Psychiatric Services, Emergency Services, and more. He's been in his current position with Nursing Support for more than six years.

A graduate of Indiana University East, Newton lives in Fountain City with his wife, Vickie. They have two daughters, Amber and Erin; three sons, Dustin, Bobby, and Zach; and 12 grandchildren.

"It's so rewarding knowing we as nurses can all come together to be there for patients, families, and each other through miracles, death, and celebrations of life," Newton said. "Nothing can be better than holding your breath waiting to watch a newborn breathe for the first time. And it's a privilege to be there for a family when they're going through their toughest time in losing a loved one. This is why we chose nursing."

Emmi Newton, RN, 5 North

Being a nurse during the COVID-19 pandemic has been difficult to say the least, but there are silver linings to be found in the appreciation patients have for the high-quality care they receive.

"The most rewarding thing about being a nurse is no matter how difficult it is -- and we all know how the past couple years have been -- it only takes that one patient who tells you how much your care meant to them to make your day," said Emmi Newton.

"In that one moment, it makes me realize why I love my job and why I continue to choose nursing."

Newton has worked at Reid for nearly 20 years, starting as a clerk in July 2002. She's been in her current position for almost two years.

A native of Richmond, Newtown received her nursing degree from Hondros College of Nursing. She still lives in Richmond, along with her husband of 20 years, Bryan, and their two children, Ethan and Lauren. The family has two dogs, two chickens, and a lizard.

"I chose nursing as a career because I've always enjoyed taking care of people. I enjoy learning about what they do for a living, their families, and their passions in life," Newton said. "In nursing, you need to have compassion and be able to put yourself in other people's shoes. That's what I love about it."

Lance Pence, RN, Critical Care

Last year, Lance Pence got to celebrate his wife's being named a Nursing Excellence Award honoree. This year, it's his turn in the spotlight.

Pence and his wife, Tara, live in Hagerstown. They have four children -- Alex, Andrew, David, and TJ -- and three grandchildren with another one on the way.

For a little more than four years, Pence has worked in the Critical Care Unit, with the past year coming as a charge nurse. He received his nursing degree from Indiana University East.

"As a medic, I gained a tremendous amount of respect for the nurses in the critical care areas. I hoped someday I'd have the same amount of knowledge they had," Pence said.

"It's so rewarding as a nurse to be there in the moment for families and patients during what's likely to be some of the most traumatic times in a person's life and bringing calm and reassurance to the situation."

Courtney Rhodabarger, RN, Acute Rehab Unit

Courtney Rhodabarger got a close look at what being a nurse is all about while working as a certified nursing assistant. She knew then what her next step would be.

"I fell in love. I wanted to help others feel better," she said.

After earning her bachelor's degree from Indiana University East, Rhodabarger made her way to Reid two years later, working at the Care Pavilion in Connersville. She joined the Acute Rehab Unit nearly a year ago.

"My favorite thing about being a rehab nurse is watching the transformation patients go through from the time when they come to us, to completing therapy, and then discharging to go back home with their families," she said.

A Centerville native, Rhodabarger continues to live in the town with her husband, Kasey, and their two boys, Corbyn and Kayson, as well as their dogs, Josie and Trigger.

LeAnne Stiver, RN, Wound Ostomy Care

It was a chance encounter that sparked the idea of pursuing a career in nursing for LeAnne Stiver.

"As a college student, I came upon an accident driving home from work one night. At the time, I was a psych major," she said.

"There were significant injuries to the patient, including to his arms and head. That experience intrigued me. For the first time, I felt drawn to a profession. I later switched my major to nursing."

Stiver would go on to get her nursing degree from Indiana Wesleyan University and join Reid in 2005. She's held the same position over the 17 years since.

"Working at Reid Health is special because everybody here has a desire to see everyone else improve and grow," she said. "I love the diversity that working in nursing offers. You can specialize in a particular field and still be part of a larger team."

Stiver lives in New Paris, Ohio, with her husband of 20 years, Dean. The couple have six kids, Beth, Alex, Chris S., Jason, Chris H., and Cody.

Chelsea Vogel, RN, Progressive Care

A native of Fort Recovery, Ohio, Chelsea Vogel earned her nursing degree from Ball State University.

She joined Reid in 2017 and has worked on the Progressive Care Unit ever since.

"Since I was young, I always wanted to be a nurse. I always imagined serving others as a nurse and truly making an impact during their toughest days," Vogel said.

"It's such a hard career, but it's also such a rewarding one in so many ways. There's no feeling like when a patient looks at you and truly appreciates everything you've done for them."

Vogel continues to live in Fort Recovery with her husband, Nic.

Kristin Wright, RN, Reid Outpatient Surgery and Endoscopy

Kristin Wright was inspired by her mother's example to become a nurse, but it was a high school internship that showed her exactly what kind of nurse she wanted to be.

"I chose nursing because I grew up watching my mother as a nurse and saw the passion she had for taking care of patients," Wright said.

"I did an internship in surgery my senior year of high school and absolutely fell in love with every aspect of it and knew I wanted to work in that area."

A lifelong Richmond resident, Wright graduated from Indiana University East. She joined Reid as a student nurse tech while working her way through college before eventually making her way to Reid Outpatient Surgery and Endoscopy.

"I get such joy in seeing patients go home from their surgery with their issue or illness alleviated so they can live their lives how they desire," Wright said. "I enjoy getting to provide such personal care to patients who are experiencing a scary time in their lives and creating a positive surgical experience for them."

Wright has been married to her high school sweetheart, Matthew, for six years. They have twin children, Gavin and Raelynn.

Multiple Events Scheduled for May at Morrisson-Reeves Library

Posted May 9, 2022

Supplied Flyer: MRL May Events

Program Pickup Kits for Adults and Teens

Design your own tile using our convenient pre-packaged supply kits. Turn your permanent marker scribbles into amazing abstract art with a Tie-Dye effect. Kits provide a creative outlet to complete on your own time. Get your free Program Pickup Kit from the Main Desk. Supplies are limited.

Joe's Truck Stop

Live Country Blues

Thursday | May 12 | 5:30 NEW TIME!

Historic Courtyard at MRL

From a ridge in the Ohio River Valley, on a front porch where Kentucky's visible through the winter's bare trees, Joe Truck Stop conspires over a smoking blend of Bluegrass, Honky Tonk, Western Swing, and whatever else finds itself inhaled and manifested by way of a wood box and steel wire. Years of digesting so much of the Country Blues lexicon and traveling the country learning the numerous styles of fiddlers, writers, and travelers alike has led to the original music that comes by way of Joe's Truck Stop.

The songs are stories of living on the road, love, temptation, heartbreak, family, banjo pickin' tobacco spittin' women, gas station sushi, and much more.

Joe Macheret (Cincinnati, OH), bandleader and member of Cincinnati string band, The Tillers, has also lent his instrumental skills on stage and in the studio to JD Wilkes and the Legendary Shack Shakers, the Urban Pioneers, Buffalo Wabs and the Price Hill Hustle, Bill Kirchen, Redd Volkaert, Justin Wells, Chelsea Ford and the Trouble, Maria Carrelli, Lenny Lashley, and many other musicians and bands.

Craft Night for Adults

Wednesday | May 18 | 6:00 pm

Bard Room

Want a way to feel like a kid again with no pressure to make good art? Come to Bad Art Night at MRL. We'll have art supplies to make all the best "bad art" including macaroni, yarn, paper, paints, glitter and more. Whether you love your finished masterpiece, love to laugh at it, or just enjoy the nostalgia, you'll have a fun night with other creative adults. No one is encouraged to be a Van Gogh, or Picasso at the Bad Art Night. It's a no-holds-barred event for the artistically challenged to have a little fun and create something truly creative or truly awful.

Gennett Records and Jazz Greats

With Guest Artist Evelyn Gordon

Thursday | May 19 | 6:00pm

Bard Room

For this "Edu-tainment" concert, Evelyn Gordon will sing several tunes that were either composed by, or made famous by, African American musicians who were once artists on the Gennett label. She will also present background information about the artists and their work with Gennett.

Evelyn Gordon is a musician and Human Resources professional originally from Pittsburgh, PA. She has experience performing various styles of music including choral, classical, neo-soul, gospel, and jazz, both nationally and internationally. In addition to performing, she has recorded with ensembles and as a soloist on several projects, including her own solo album, Honey So Sweet, released in 2009.

This program is free and open to the public. No reservations are required. For more information, please phone MRL, (765) 966-8291.

Community Resource Fair Hosted by Reid Health Community Outreach and Boys & Girls Clubs Of Wayne County May 17TH

Posted May 9, 2022

Supplied Flyer: Community Resource Fair

Reid Health Community Outreach is partnering with the Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County to host a community resource fair on Tuesday, May 17th from 4 – 6 PM at the First Bank Boys & Girls Club at the Reverend James M Townsend Memorial building located at 855 North 12th St in Richmond.

Various community resources will be available, including some organizations that will share job openings. The fair will be held in the Club parking lot unless weather conditions require a move into the Club gym. There will be free food and giveaways, including a $100 Visa Gift card to one adult attending and a $100 gift card for one student attending.

The Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County will unveil a Little Free Library and Mt. Olive Baptist Church will unveil a Free Community Food Pantry at the Club location during the fair.

The community is invited to stop in for information and free refreshments and visit with your neighbors and friends in Richmond. The Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County will also plan a future neighborhood event to celebrate a second Little Free Library placement at the Ronald L McDaniel Club located at 1900 West Main St in Richmond. The Women's Workshop of Richmond will help Club teens build benches for the placements.

The community resource fair, Little Free Libraries and Free Community Pantry placement projects are being provided through Forward Wayne County's NICE (Neighborhood Involvement and Community Engagement) Grant. Funds provided by Lilly Endowment Inc.

Registration Open for 17th Annual Aging Well Conference, Stars of HGTV Show, Good Bones, to Headline

Posted May 9, 2022

Supplied Graphic/Photo: Lifestream Aging Well Conference

LifeStream Services is pleased to announce registration is now open for the 17th Annual Aging Well Conference, which welcomes Karen E. Laine and Mina Starsiak Hawk of the hit HGTV show, Good Bones, as keynote speakers. On the show, the mother-daughter duo hunt down battered homes in bleaker Indianapolis neighborhoods and transform them with the help of some rough-and-ready demo teams. Karen E. Laine is also a native of Richmond, Ind.

The Aging Well Conference is set for Thursday, June 2, 2022 from 8:00am to 3:30pm at the Horizon Convention Center located at 401 S. High St. Muncie, IN 47305. The conference is designed for older adults, caregivers, wellness enthusiasts, and health professionals to learn how to make positive changes in their lives and the lives of others. The conference includes a resource fair, light breakfast, and educational breakout sessions.

A plated lunch will be served followed by Karen E. Laine and Mina Hawk's presentation. Limited lunch-only tickets will be available to purchase for those who wish to enjoy the keynote presentation and lunch only.

Registration and sponsorship/resource fair information can be found at lifestreaminc.org/aging-well-conference. Those who would like more information, may contact Angie Jenkins, Outreach Coordinator, at 765-748-6994 or ajenkins@lifestreaminc.org.

Class of 2022 by the Numbers

Posted May 9, 2022

Supplied Graphic: IU East 2022 Graduate InfoThe Class of 2022 will receive 802 diplomas during Indiana University East's Commencement Ceremony on Friday, May 13. This year's commencement ceremony is at 6 p.m. and will be held at the Richmond High School Tiernan Center.

Of the degrees being conferred, 758 are bachelor's degrees and 44 are master's degrees.

Graduates and their families are invited to share their cap and gown photos and unique celebrations with IU East on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram using the hashtags #iueast and #iueastgrad2022. The Commencement Ceremony will be broadcast via live stream video at iue.edu/live (note: this website may not be live until the day of the ceremony). Richmond residents can also watch the ceremony live on WCTV Channel 20.

The Class of 2022 has several characteristics.

Of the total number of graduates, there are 62 Indiana counties represented, 36 states and 27 countries.

A brief glance at the statistics and figures provides a look at the graduates joining nearly 12,800 IU East alumni.

  • Indiana Resident: 555
  • Non-Resident: 222
  • Reciprocity residents: 67
  • Male: 266
  • Female: 511
  • Minorities represented: 13.8 percent
  • The oldest student graduating is 68, the youngest is 20.
  • The most numerous degree to be granted is the B.S. in Business Administration (138).
  • The second most frequent degree to be granted is the B.S. in Psychology (135).
  • First generation students: 34.9 percent.

If sorting graduates by age, those who are 23 and younger compose 28.7 percent of the Class of 2022. Graduates ages 23-24 represent 17.4 percent of the class while those 30 and over compose 37.2 percent. Within the Class of 2022, 38 undergraduate and 11 graduate students earned a 4.0 GPA.

IU East continues to boast an array of diverse graduates. Non-traditionally aged students make up the majority of graduates this year, and minority graduates have increased — up from 12.6 percent in 2021 and 10.7 percent in 2020.

For more information, visit iue.edu/commencement.

IU East's 51st Commencement Ceremony will be held May 13

Posted May 9, 2022

iue-grad-2019.jpg
IU East will celebrate the Class of 2022 on Friday, May 13, at the Richmond High School Tiernan Center.
Indiana University East will host its 51st Commencement Ceremony is at 6 p.m. on Friday, May 13, at the Richmond High School Tiernan Center.

This year, the university will confer 758 baccalaureate degrees and 44 master's degrees.

Indiana University President Pamela Whitten and IU East Chancellor Kathryn Girten will preside and address the 802 graduates eligible to receive IU degrees during the ceremony. The figures include degree recipients from December 2021 and candidates for May, June and August 2022.

This will be the first commencement President Whitten is attending for IU Bloomington and IU's regional campuses.

This year will be Chancellor Girten's last Commencement Ceremony. Girten recently announced her plans to retire June 30 after serving as chancellor for nine years.

The Commencement Ceremony will be broadcast via live stream video at iue.edu/live (note: this website may not be live until the day of the ceremony). Live commencement updates and commentary will be available on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Follow or post using the hashtags #iueast and #iueastgrad2022. Richmond residents can also watch the ceremony live on WCTV Channel 20.

Cici Bellis, Orlando, Florida, will address fellow classmates during the ceremony as the student speaker. Bellis, who will receive a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a minor in finance, was selected to address the 2022 class after an application process. Bellis is a retired professional tennis player from the Women's Tennis Association (WTA).

Matthew Paterson, Richmond, Indiana, is the recipient of the Naomi Osborne Award, an honor given to the graduate with the highest grade point average, and will lead the graduating class during the alumni induction ceremony. He is originally from Rothwell, England, and a member of the men's track and field team at IU East. Paterson will receive a Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry.

IU East will host events and ceremonies leading up to the 51st Commencement Ceremony.

IU East's Hooding Ceremony for master's degree candidates will be held at 10 a.m. on Friday, May 13, in Vivian Auditorium, located in Whitewater Hall. The hooding ceremony signifies a scholarly and personal achievement. This ceremony is by invitation.

Also the day of commencement, the IU East School of Nursing and Health Sciences will host its pinning ceremony for nursing graduates at 2 p.m. in Vivian Auditorium with a slide show followed by the ceremony at 2:30 p.m. Graduates will receive their pin to wear for the Commencement Ceremony and nursing awards will be given to students.

For more information, visit iue.edu/commencement.

Richmond Art Museum Receives Unique Gift To Be Sold At Auction In Indianapolis To Benefit Educational Programs

Posted May 9, 2022

Supplied Photo:  White Excalibur Car

RAM received a phone call in April from a patron, John Turner-Grey, "I'd like to donate a car to benefit the museum. Don't worry, it is a work of art." When we arrived at the home, and the garage door opened, it appeared as if Cruella DeVille's car might be in Turner-Grey's possession. We soon learned that what was being offered to the Richmond Art Museum was a 1984 Excalibur Series IV Phaeton. Complete with large, classic, white-wall tires, teak wood running boards, an all-white paint job and plenty of chrome accents; featuring both a hard and soft top, this luxury convertible is indeed a work of art.

RAM will be offering the car for sale at auction as Lot 84 on Sunday, May 15th through Mecum Auctions in Indianapolis at the Indiana State Fairground. Interested parties can bid to take home this limited edition classic.

All proceeds from the auction will go to support RAM educational programming, such as the Art Is… program for K-3rd grade students, the All Wayne County High School Art Exhibition, which is currently showing at RAM now until May 14, and RAM VanGo programs which bring art into local and regional classrooms.

The vehicle was on display during the recent RAM/IU East fundraising event, Palette to Palate, and was a crowd favorite. When asked about the donation, Turner-Grey said simply, "I know the proceeds are going to a worthy cause."

RAM is grateful for the donation and for Mr. Turner-Grey's confidence in the organization. You can find out more information about how to register to attend the auction at https://www.mecum.com/lots/SC0522-501075/1984-excalibur-series-iv-roadster/

Singles Interaction, Inc.

Posted May 9, 2022

Supplied Newsletter: Singles Interaction May 2022

If you are 21 years of age or better and single, divorced, widow or widower, Singles' Interaction invites you to join them on Friday nights. Come to the Eagles Lodge, 75 South 12th Street, Richmond (membership not required) and meet other single people in the Richmond area.

Wayne County ATHENA Leadership Award Nominations Open as of May 6th

Posted May 9, 2022

Wayne County ATHENA Leadership Awards will accept nominations beginning today (May 6) for its ATHENA Leadership Award, ATHENA Young Professional Award, and the ATHENA Organizational Leadership Award.

Nominations will close at 5 p.m. on Friday, June 17. Nomination forms are available at waynecoathena.com.

All ATHENA award recipients will be announced before the dinner.

The awards will be presented at the annual dinner at 6 p.m. on Thursday, August 18, at Forest Hills Country Club, located at 2169 South 23rd St. in Richmond, Indiana.

The ATHENA Leadership Award® will be presented to an exemplary leader who has achieved excellence in their business or profession, served the community in a meaningful way and, most importantly, actively assisted women to achieve their full leadership potential. The event recognizes women leaders who motivate, inspire and create positive change in the community. Previous award recipients include Mary Jo Clark, Jackie Carberry, Kim Poinsett, Angie Dickman, Janis Buhl-Macy, and Melissa Vance.

The ATHENA Young Professional Leadership Award actively supports and celebrates the ATHENA mission of supporting, developing and honoring women leaders, inspiring women to achieve their full potential—creating balance in leadership worldwide. ATHENA Young Professional Leadership Nominees are 18-35 years age. Nominees are emerging women leaders who demonstrate excellence, creativity and initiative in their business or profession. Provides valuable service to improve the quality of life for others in their community. Clearly serves as a role model for young women both personally and professionally. Previous award recipients include Jessie Pilewski and Ashley Sieb.

This is the first year the ATHENA Organizational Leadership Award will be presented in Wayne County. The award actively supports and celebrates the ATHENA mission of supporting, developing and honoring women leaders, inspiring women to achieve their full potential—creating balance in leadership worldwide. ATHENA organizational nominees are business or organizations, in the profit or non-profit sectors – who create an organizational culture that encourages women employees to achieve their full leadership potential or gives back to the larger community of women and girls by providing and/ or supporting leadership development opportunities and initiatives.

Founded over 30 years ago, ATHENA International is a women's leadership organization that supports, develops and honors women leaders through the programs it administers. ATHENA's flagship program, the ATHENA Leadership Award® Program, has honored over 7,000 women leaders from hundreds of cities and eight countries since its inception in 1982. The program is facilitated locally by Wayne Bank and Indiana University East, licensed ATHENA host organizations. Nominations are sought throughout the community and recipients are selected by a diverse group of community leaders based on the criteria above.

ATHENA Leadership Award® recipients hail from all professional sectors. The award's rich history, international scope and emphasis on mentorship make this award unique and amongst the most prestigious leadership awards one can receive.

Wayne Bank and Indiana University East are honored to bring this award to Wayne County, established locally in 2014. ATHENA Leadership Award® recipients are presented a hand-cast, bronze and crystal sculpture that symbolizes the strength, courage and wisdom of ATHENA recipients.

Local sponsorship is provided by Wayne Bank and IU East. Proceeds benefit local organizations dedicated to serving leadership building for women of all ages.

To RSVP visit waynecoathena.com or contact JoAnn Spurlock, vice president, director of operations at Wayne Bank, at (765) 259-0209 or jspurlock@waynebnk.com or Paula Kay King, director of Gift Development at IU East, at (765) 973-8331 or pkayking@iue.edu.

ATHENA Leadership Awards Nomination Process

  • Wayne County ATHENA Leadership Awards will present three awards this year:
  • ATHENA Leadership Award
  • ATHENA Young Professional Award
  • ATHENA Organizational Leadership Award, a new award added for 2022.
  • Nominations are open from May 6 to June 17.
  • All ATHENA award recipients will be announced before the dinner.
  • Recipients will be presented with ATHENA awards during the annual dinner at 6 p.m. on Thursday, August 18, at Forest Hills Country Club, located at 2169 South 23rd St. in Richmond, Indiana.
  • The community is invited to submit their nominations at waynecoathena.com.

Gennett Records: The Birthplace of American Recorded Music Signature Dinner, Exhibit Premier and Program presented by First Bank Richmond

Posted May 5, 2022

Supplied Graphic: Gennett Parrot LogoThe Wayne County Historical Museum is pleased to announce it's 2022 Signature Dinner, Exhibit, and Program.

The Wayne County Historical Museum will debut its exhibit celebrating the far-reaching story of Gennett Records and celebrate its contributions through time and space. The Indiana Historical Society's recent exhibit on this beloved Wayne County story will come to the Wayne County Historical Museum permanently as part of this collaborative exhibit and program. The exhibit will take visitors throughout the main museum and community building and will highlight the Gennett Family, The Gennett Legacy, important connections made to Gennett records and more. Additionally, artifacts will be on display until 2023 from the New Orleans Jazz Museum, Rutgers Institute of Jazz Studies, The Birthplace of Country Music, The family of Bradley Kincaid, The family of Marion McKay, and the Gennett family. Exciting interactive elements will transport visitors through the exhibit areas highlighting the Gennett recording story.

The exhibit premier will kick off our 2022 Signature Dinner and Program. Attendees will be transported back to 1920's Richmond with a themed experience and dinner catered by Old Richmond Inn. Guided tours of the exhibit will be held prior to the dinner hour. Selfie Stations, artwork on display by Pam Frazier, a Gennett themed silent auction, and live music from Earlham Jazz Band will get everyone into the spirit of the evening. Mayor Dave Snow will MC the dinner, where a premier of a video celebrating the far-reaching story of Gennett Records will be shown. Some of the participants of the video include The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, The Country Music Hall of Fame, The Delta Blues Museum, and more.

After dinner, attendees will hear from 10 speakers from around the country who will highlight the road paved by Gennett Records in the field of American recorded music. Speakers include Charlie Dahan, Author of Starr-Piano & Gennett Records, Rick Kennedy, Author of Jellyroll, Bix & Hoagy, Elizabeth Surles, Archivist at Rutgers Institute of Jazz Studies, Danny Gonzales, Director of Exhibition at Indiana Historical Society, Todd Gould, Producer of The Music Makers of Gennett Records, David Kunian & Greg Lambousy of the New Orleans Jazz Museum, and Bob Jacobsen & Tina Conti, Former Board Presidents of the Starr-Gennett Foundation. The direct descendants of the Gennett Family will be on hand to help celebrate this important legacy.

This annual signature event allows for YOUR Wayne County Historical Museum to continue our mission to educate the public, promote, collect, preserve, and interpret the rich heritage of Wayne County, Indiana and illustrate the county's role in American and World Culture.

The exhibit will open to the public on Sunday June 26, 2022 with a public program and exhibit opening-press release to follow.

Venue: Wayne County Historical Museum 1150 North A Street Richmond, IN 47374
Virtual Tickets for the Speaker's portion of the evening are also available

Date: Saturday June 25, 2022, 5:30pm

Admission: $75.00 in person, $25.00 virtual
Tickets can be purchased online by visiting our website and clicking on the 2022 Signature Event tab. Tickets may also be purchased by calling or stopping by the museum during regular business hours.

COVID-19 Rising Again in Indiana So Make Sure You're Up to Date on Vaccinations

Posted May 9, 2022

According to the Indiana Department of Health, COVID-19 cases are rising once again in Indiana, making now the time to get up to date on your vaccinations if you aren't already.

Only 15,267 of Wayne County's more than 66,000 residents have received their primary series of COVID-19 vaccinations as well as a booster shot. The numbers are similarly low for the seven other Indiana and Ohio counties in Reid Health's service area.

Being up to date on your COVID-19 vaccines means you've received all the doses recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). That includes the primary series of whatever vaccine you initially chose as well as any booster shots for which you're eligible.

Initial boosters should be received at least five months after completing your primary series of doses for those who had Pfizer or Moderna. Johnson & Johnson recipients should get a booster at least two months after their primary dose.

If it's been at least four months since your booster shot and you are either over the age of 50 or immunocompromised, you can get a second booster dose.

Vaccination remains the best protection we have against COVID-19. According to the CDC, it creates a more predictable immune response than "natural immunity" from infection, reduces your likelihood of spreading the virus to those who might be more vulnerable than you, and lessens the chances of new variants emerging and causing more problems.

Also, the vaccines are very effective in protecting against severe illness -- including hospitalization and death -- from all current variants and subvariants, especially for those who have had their boosters.

FREE primary doses and booster shots are available at the Reid Health Residency Clinic, 795 Sim Hodgin Parkway in Richmond.

Walk-ins are welcome from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday-Thursday and 8 a.m. to noon Friday. Appointments can be made for those hours by calling Reid's COVID-19 Hotline at (765) 965-4200. The hotline is open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. seven days a week.

Indiana residents can find other nearby vaccination sites and schedule a time at those locations by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.

Townsend Center Block Party

Posted April 13, 2022

Supplied Graphic:  Townsend Community Center Block PartyThe entire Wayne County Community is invited to the First Annual Block Party!

Townsend Community Center, Inc.
300 North 10th Street
Richmond, IN 47374

May 21, 2022 | 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Community Resources, Educational Resources

Food and Fun for everyone!

For more information, please call the Center at 765.488.2042 or visit townsendcommunitycenter.org.

Tox-a-way Day - May 14, 2022

Posted May 5, 2022

Supplied Flier: Tox-a-way Day 2022

Tox-A-Way Day is scheduled for 9 a.m.-noon May 14 at New Paris Pike Landfill, 5242 New Paris Pike

Acceptable items for disposal include paints, thinners, solvents, oils, aerosols, herbicides, pesticides, single-use batteries and most liquid household wastes. Containers may not be larger than five gallons.

Singles Interaction, Inc.

Posted March 17, 2022

Supplied Newsletter: Singles Interaction April 2022

If you are 21 years of age or better and single, divorced, widow or widower, Singles' Interaction invites you to join them on Friday nights. Come to the Eagles Lodge, 75 South 12th Street, Richmond (membership not required) and meet other single people in the Richmond area.

2022 Richmond Columbian Properties, William G. Scott House Quality of Place Conference

"A Frank Discussion on Apathy and Leadership"

Posted February 28, 2022

After the Covid 19 Pandemic, Richmond Columbian Properties is hosting the return of its highly successful Quality of Place Conference. This year's conference will be Friday, April 22, 2022, with sessions starting at 1:00 P.M. There will no registration fees however we will appreciate any tax-deductible contributions to our efforts to raise the awareness of the importance of preserving our architectural heritage and reinvesting in historically significant neighborhoods.

Reservations can be made on Eventbrite, https://www.eventbrite.com/e/2022-quality-of-place-conference-tickets-271362220707. Registration will begin at 11:00 A.M. allowing for time to also tour Richmond's six National Register Historic Districts. Food trucks will be on-site for those wanting lunch. The conference location is at the William G. Scott House at 204 North 10th Street in Richmond, Indiana's Elizabeth Starr National Register Historic District. https://richmondcolumbianproperties.org/

Our Speakers:

Marsh Davis, President of Indiana Landmarks. "Serving people and saving Indiana's architectural heritage." Indiana is blessed to have the most prestigious statewide historic preservation organization in the country working to preserve the significant character of our state. Mr. Davis will lead an in-depth discussion of the work and success of Indiana Landmarks and its impact on our communities.

Urban Light Community Church and Urban Light Community Development, introduced by Rev. Martin Holman retired Pastor from Hillcrest Baptist Church in Richmond. Learn how local churches serve a valuable ministry improving their neighborhoods through social and development programs encouraging residents to become engaged and take leadership roles. https://www.urbanlightcdc.org/

Keynote Speaker:

Jeff Siegler, Revitalize or Die. Jeff is from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and offers an honest perspective on the negative results of apathy in a community. The only way to combat the effects of apathy is by fostering a sense of civic pride. By focusing on identity, aesthetics, sense of community, standards, engagement, and action, I assist communities in becoming places residents can be proud to call home. https://revitalizeordie.com/

We wish to thank our partners First Bank Richmond, Indiana Landmarks, Paul and Pat Lingle

Free Tax Service at MRL

Posted January 18, 2022

Supplied Flyer: MRL Tax ServiceIt's tax time! Why not receive free help with filing your taxes? Free tax preparation assistance provided by AARP's Certified Tax-Aide volunteers is available at Morrisson-Reeves Library starting on February 2nd. This free service is offered through April 15th.

Due to COVID-19 restrictions, the service will be offered by appointment only. Call 765-203-1788 to reserve your time with a tax preparer. Once your appointment is made, instructions will be given for your intake interview and tax document drop-off details. Services include Indiana and Federal Tax form preparation including handy electronic filing.

A dozen certified volunteers will be on hand to assist patrons. Although there are no income restrictions for this service, individuals with tax returns that are deemed too complex will be referred to a tax professional.

For further details, contact the library at 765-966-8291 or online at MRLinfo.org.

It will be necessary to bring the following items in order to be properly served:

  • Last year's tax return
  • Photo ID
  • Social Security cards and birth dates of all names listed on tax returns, including dependents;
  • All W2s, 1099s, and other tax statements received for the tax year;
  • Receipts for deductions including tax receipts;
  • Rent receipts, name and address of landlord if claiming renter's deduction;
  • Care provider's name, address, and identifying number if claiming deduction for Dependent Care;
  • Amount(s) and date(s) of each payment of estimated taxes during the tax year;
  • Voided check or savings account routing numbers for direct deposit of refund.

CDC: COVID-19 Much More Likely to Cause Rare Cases of Heart Inflammation Than Vaccines

Posted April 13, 2022

For some parents, rare cases of heart inflammation called myocarditis or pericarditis in children and young adults who have received the Pfizer or Moderna COVID-19 vaccines have been reason enough not to have their children vaccinated. But new data shows the risk of this rare complication is much higher for those who catch the virus than for those who get the shots.

Myocarditis is inflammation of the heart muscle, while pericarditis is inflammation of the heart's outer lining. Both are caused by the body's immune system in response to an infection or some other trigger.

Rare cases have been reported after receiving the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines, especially in male adolescents and young adults and more often after the second dose.

For the few who have experienced myocarditis or pericarditis after vaccination, most of those who received care responded well to medicine and rest and felt better quickly, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

But for those who might hesitate to vaccinate their children because of this, the CDC recently released new data that shows the risk for myocarditis and pericarditis actually is much higher from COVID-19 infection.

According to the study, the risk of heart complications after infection is 2-6 times higher for teen boys (ages 12-17) than from vaccination. For young men (ages 18-29), the risk from 7-8 times greater from infection.

In fact, the data shows infection was significantly more likely to cause heart inflammation for both males and females across all age groups.

With this new data in hand, the CDC continues to recommend everyone age 5 and older get vaccinated against COVID-19 because the known risks of infection -- including long-term health problems and severe illness that could lead to hospitalization and death -- far outweigh any potential risks from the vaccines.

FREE primary doses and booster shots are available at the Reid Health Residency Clinic, 795 Sim Hodgin Parkway in Richmond.

Walk-ins are welcome from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday-Thursday and 8 a.m. to noon Friday. Appointments can be made for those hours by calling Reid's COVID-19 Hotline at (765) 965-4200. The hotline is open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. seven days a week.

Indiana residents can find other nearby vaccination sites and schedule a time at those locations by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.

Providers are required by the federal government to bill an administrative fee to insurance carriers for vaccinations, but patients do not have to pay that fee or any portion of it that goes unpaid by their insurance company.

Get the latest COVID-19 stats from Reid Health, now updated every Monday.

For more information about COVID-19 and vaccinations, go to the Safe Pathways to Care page on the Reid Health website.

Reid Radiology Staff Putting New 3T MRI Machine to Work

Posted April 13, 2022

Supplied Photo: 3T MRI Machine at Reid HealthReid Health Radiology Services has a new tool available to help patients who would benefit from higher magnetic field strength MRI scans.

A new 3T MRI machine was installed recently at Reid Health Hospital, and staff have been busy getting it ready and themselves up to speed on the best ways to put it to use to improve patient care.

Many MRIs are 1.5T, a measure of the strength of the magnetic field generated by the machine. This new equipment has double the magnetic field strength, which leads to enhanced image quality and details for some exams such as orthopedic scans in which smaller body parts are easier to see thanks to the higher-resolution images.

"The 3T technology more effectively enhances changes that occur in tissue resulting from some disease processes and injuries. This makes detection of abnormalities in small body parts easier," said Beth Ingram, MD, Reid radiologist and Radiology Medical Director.

Another area in which the 3T MRI will prove useful is in diagnosing neurological issues. MRIs help in the diagnosis and treatment of brain tumors, strokes, aneurysms, abscesses, multiple sclerosis, and many other conditions.

"The 3T MRI visualizes the brain with unprecedented detail," said Jordan Raynor, MD, Reid neurologist and Stroke Medical Director. "These high-quality images are invaluable in confidently finding the correct diagnosis and monitoring treatment."

"This is state-of-the-art. Having a 3T MRI in a community the size of Richmond is not the norm. It is truly a benefit to be able to stay in the area and have access to advanced equipment like this." -- Gene DiTullio, Director of Radiology Services

A wider opening means the new machine can more comfortably accommodate patients, making scans more manageable for those who feel uneasy in tight spaces. The 3T MRI also is much quieter than other models.

"A 3T MRI is a specialty piece of equipment. It works well for certain procedures but not others," said Gene DiTullio, Director of Radiology Services for Reid Health. "For many exams, our 1.5T MRIs will provide the same amount of information that the 3T can, but there are times when the 3T technology will be very beneficial.

"This is state-of-the-art. Having a 3T MRI in a community the size of Richmond is not the norm. It is truly a benefit to be able to stay in the area and have access to advanced equipment like this."

Senior Adult Ministry April Meeting

Posted April 11, 2022

The Senior Adult Ministry's next meeting features the Sweet Sounds of Starr Valley dulcimer group at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, April 26, at First United Methodist Church, 318 National Road West, Richmond. Please bring a friend and bring a snack to share if you can.

Future monthly programs for 2022 include a pitch-in picnic at Veteran's Park, Everyone's birthday, Beautiful candles: how it's done, and Gentle Exercise for Seniors. Senior Adult Ministry is an active group of seniors over 50 years old open to all regardless of religious affiliation. The group is guided by Pastor Judi Marshall, Clara Bulmer and Beverly Kirby. These three women actively share their gifts of ministry, hospitality and creativity in planning and organizing the monthly meetings.

For further information, call 765-962-4357.

LifeStream Awarded Rural Food Access Grant, Expands Homebound Food Distribution Program

Posted April 7, 2022

LifeStream Services is excited to announce the expansion of their food distribution program into all 5 counties of their southernmost service area including Fayette, Franklin, Rush, Union, and Wayne. The expansion, made possible through a partnership with Gleaners Food Bank and funding from the CDC's Rural Food Access grant, allows for more access to nutritious food options for rural Indiana counties serving higher risk, underserved communities disproportionately affected by COVID-19.

With food items provided through Gleaners, LifeStream's program ensures homebound individuals have access to fresh, nutritious food options delivered to their homes. Alohna Warren, Food Access Coordinator of the Division of Nutrition and Physical Activity at Indiana Department of Health explained, "This heralds an exciting awareness to additional solutions for good health! There is a nationwide movement to understand and provide support that impacts access to nutritious food not always available to everyone."

Mandy Williams, Vice President of Programs for LifeStream added, "The past two years have put a spotlight on food insecurity among the most vulnerable in our communities, particularly homebound seniors. This funding, along with our continued partnership with Gleaners Food Bank, will allow us to continue meeting these basic needs while we work to address health disparities among all those we serve."

With Fayette and Union distributions beginning most recently in March 2022, volunteers are still needed to help those programs flourish. Those interested in volunteering in those counties can reach out to Laura Bray, Volunteer Coordinator, at lbray@lifestreaminc.org. Questions regarding the expansion and/or grant can be directed to Kim Gillenwater, Marketing Manager, at kgillenwater@lifestreaminc.org. Additional information about LifeStream Services and their programs can be found at LifeStreaminc.org.

Girls, Inc. of Wayne County Shares Results of Capital Campaign

Posted April 7, 2022

Logo:  Girls, Inc. of Wayne CountyIt is with great excitement that Girls Inc of Wayne County can share with the community the results of our recent multi-year capital campaign. Through the generosity of our donors and with the help of a dedicated capital campaign committee, board of directors, and our staff, we were able to raise over $860,000 and invest it into our center located at 1407 South 8th Street in Richmond. We invite the community to tour our new and improved space where we will showcase our renovated program spaces and STEAM lab, all outfitted with new furniture, as well as outdoor spaces that include our new playground. Many other updates include new windows, HVAC, roof, insulation, and the removal of three blighted homes across the street for enhanced safety.

We would like to thank our Capital Campaign Committee Chair Kristin Carter and committee members Christie Ferriell, Valerie Shaffer, Jennifer Lewis, and Jackie Webb. Special thank you to our Executive Director, Marcy Crull, for bringing the board's vision to life through the implementation of our capital campaign projects. We are forever grateful to our long list of donors who made these projects possible and are appreciative of their ongoing support. Our new donor wall pays tribute to these supporters and showcases their contributions. It is thanks to their generosity we have been able to more than triple the number of girls that we serve expanding our impact on young girls in the community.

We would like to invite the community in to see the results of this work and learn why parents and guardians trust Girls Inc to mentor, engage, and educate their girls to be to be our strong, smart, and bold leaders of tomorrow.

Join us on Thursday, April 21st from 4:00 – 7:00 pm at 1407 South 8 th Street, Richmond. We will have light refreshments, offer tours of the center, and provide information about our 2022 summer program.

Five IU East Faculty Members Receive Grant Awards for Research, Create Community Engagement Courses

Posted April 7, 2022

Five faculty members at Indiana University East have received grants for research projects and course development.

The awards have been presented to the faculty and will be announced during the Faculty and Staff Annual Award Ceremony on April 15.

Faculty awards and recipients include:

  • Erwin and Priscilla Boschmann Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Grant: Kelly Blewett, assistant professor of English, IU East School of Humanities and Social Sciences.
  • Center for Faculty Development Faculty Fellowship in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) for 2022: Yan Liu, assistant professor of business administration and management, IU East School of Business and Economics.
  • Chancellor's Community Engagement Course Development Grant: KT Lowe, assistant librarian for instruction, IU East Campus Library, and Tanya Perkins, assistant professor of English, IU East School of Humanities and Social Sciences.
  • Chancellor's Community Engagement Course Development Grant: Jaynne Rivas, assistant professor of management, IU East School of Business and Economics.
Supplied Photo:  Kelly Blewett
Kelly Blewett

The Erwin and Priscilla Boschmann Scholarship grant opportunity is made possible through the generous contribution of Erwin and Priscilla Boschmann. This award is offered annually to full-time faculty to support research in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) at IU East.

Blewett plans to work on her project, "Number versus Letter: Grade Presentation Settings as Feedback in the Writing Classroom," and prepare it for publication.

In 2021, Blewett received the Horizon Research/Creative Activity Award, which recognizes excellence in research and/or creative work by an untenured faculty member during some or all of their first four years at IU East. She presented on the project in 2019 at the Conference on College Composition and Communication, the largest national conference in the field of writing studies.

Blewett's presentation discussed the results of a 2016 study of teacher grading practices. Blewett reported how an experienced writing teacher adjusted the settings of her learning management software (Blackboard) with intended psychological effects on students. Additionally, she spent a portion of her summer in 2021 working on developing an article on the project to submit for publication to the College Composition and Communication and the Journal of Response.

Blewett received her Ph.D. in English and Comparative Literature from the University of Cincinnati. She received her Master of Arts in English from the University of Louisville and her Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy from Miami University of Ohio. Her research interests include composition theory and pedagogy, teacher feedback and reading.

Supplied Photo:  Yan Liu
Yan Liu

The Center for Faculty Development Faculty Fellowship Award is an opportunity designed to offer faculty members an opportunity to cultivate and share their knowledge, techniques, and information on a particular teaching topic. This is an excellent opportunity for new and experienced faculty to build a foundation or develop a new research trajectory in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning.

Liu will use the grant to research her project, "Design Effective Team Activities in Online Courses: How Task Interdependence and Use of Online Tools Impact Students' Engagement and Performance." The project focused on how to encourage asynchronous online students to collaborate for or complete team assignments. The purpose of the project is to examine the different formats of teamwork design an asynchronous online class, and apply management teamwork theories including task interdependence and outcome interdependence.

Liu received her Doctor of Business Administration and her Master of Business Administration with a concentration in Management from Louisiana Tech University in Ruston, Louisiana. She received her Bachelor of Science in Computer Science from Nanchang University in Nanchang, China. Her research interests include positive organizational behavior, leadership, proactive behavior, deviance behavior, human resource practice and research methodology.

The Chancellor's Community Engagement Course Development Grant goes to three faculty for two separate projects. The grant is designed to assist faculty as they develop new or modify preexisting courses based on the use of best practices in service-learning course design and assessment.

Supllied Photo:  KT Lowe Supplied Photo:  Tanya Perkins
KT Lowe Tanya Perkins

Lowe and Perkins will use the grant to develop their community service oriented course. "ENG W395: Community Archives: Methods and Process" is a project that will allow students in the course to work directly with a community archive. For this English Writing course, students will work with the Richmond Symphony Orchestra Archive with a collection spanning over 60 years' worth of material covering a diverse array of media and document types. As a primary source collection, this class also introduces research concepts related to physical objects and primary sources. The grant will help gain insight into better teaching practices regarding assignment construction, particularly with tangible collections, and to discover ways to better integrate students into community service class projects.

Lowe received her Master of Science in Information, a Graduate Certificate in Museum Studies, and a Bachelor of Arts in Asian Studies degree from the University of Michigan. Her current teaching interests include first-year experience, library instruction for humanities and social sciences. Her research interests are misinformation and information literacy, and community information seeking.

Supplied Photo:  Jaynne Rivas
Jaynne Rivas

Perkins received her Master of Fine Arts in fiction from Murray State University, and a Master of Arts and Bachelor of Arts in English Studies, both with an emphasis in creative writing, from Western Washington University in Bellingham, Washington. She teaches courses in fiction, professional and technical writing, digital writing and creative writing studies. Her research and creative interests include short story cycle, contemporary fiction, digital media, online teaching and learning, and program assessment.

Rivas will research her project, "The Recycling Power." In this project, Rivas will create a mobile unit to recycle plastic. She plans to use the mobile unit in different neighborhoods or organizations in the community to promote recycling behavior among people. This project will help students in Rivas' Business and Society course to develop analytical skills by applying theoretical frameworks to real-life situations; leadership skills through project execution; and to acquire a philanthropic culture through working as volunteers. Students will use the stakeholder theory and the corporate social responsibility theoretical frameworks to involve several organizations and people in the project implementation. The Recycling Power project is a long-lasting initiative created to grow over time.

Rivas received her Ph.D. in Business Administration and her Master of Science in Management from Tulane University. She has a Master of Science in Public Policies from IESA Business School in Caracas, Venezuela, and her Bachelor of Science in Agronomic Engineering from the Central University of Venezuela. Her research interests include institutional theory, franchise system and international business expansion.

Second Booster Shots Now Available to Those Over Age 50 and the Immunocompromised

Posted April 7, 2022

If it's been at least four months since your booster shot of the COVID-19 vaccine and you are either over the age of 50 or immunocompromised, you can now get a second booster dose.

Federal health officials have given their approval for people who fit those criteria to receive another shot of either the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine -- regardless of which vaccine they initially had -- to increase their protection against severe illness from the virus.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently shared new information about the effectiveness of booster shots, saying those who had received a booster were 21 times less likely to die from COVID-19 during the Omicron wave than those who were unvaccinated and 7 times less likely to be hospitalized.

According to the U.S. Food & Drug Administration, data has shown a dip in immunity over time from a first booster shot, making it a good idea for those who are most vulnerable to the virus to get a second booster to restore their highest level of protection.

FREE primary doses and booster shots of the vaccine are available at the Reid Health Residency Clinic, 795 Sim Hodgin Parkway in Richmond.

Walk-ins are welcome from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday-Thursday and 8 a.m. to noon Friday. Appointments can be made for those hours by calling Reid's COVID-19 Hotline at (765) 965-4200. The hotline is open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. seven days a week.

Indiana residents can find other nearby vaccination sites and schedule a time at those locations by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.

Providers are required by the federal government to bill an administrative fee to insurance carriers for vaccinations, but patients do not have to pay that fee or any portion of it that goes unpaid by their insurance company.

Get the latest COVID-19 stats from Reid Health, now updated every Monday.

For more information about COVID-19 and vaccinations, go to the Safe Pathways to Care page on the Reid Health website.

Presentation Explores History of Hoosier Natural Resources, Variety of Effects

Posted April 4, 2022

Environmental history essentially is learning from the past in order to create better ways to use and sustain our natural resources.

It's studying the interactions -- the positive and the negative -- between nature and human nature.

Often in Indiana history, the beauty of natural scenery – our forests, lakes and open land – has collided with the extraction of natural resources, such as extractions from oil wells and other energy sources.

The narratives of Indiana's environmental-history landscape "are never just about landscape," explains Ava Tomasula y Garcia.

They are about people's interactions and their positive and negative consequences, too.

The wide-ranging connections provide the background behind an upcoming IU East Facebook Live presentation by Garcia at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, April 20. The presentation, "Gas and Oil, Dirt and Ghosts: Landscape and Histories of Extraction in Indiana," is open to the public.

Supplied Photo:  Ava Tomasula y Garcia

Ava Tomasula y Garcia

Garcia is a student-writer-labor organizer who has deep roots in northern Indiana and whose background offers variety like her presentation topic. She's studying for a Ph.D. in Anthropology at Columbia University and also writes fiction and nonfiction.

"This focus on natural resources also reaches into aspects of racism," said Beth South, assistant librarian and archivist for the Campus Library at IU East.

Garcia's talk will center on the gas boom of the 1880s and the steel and fossil-fuel industries. It also will touch on topics of humanity, such as Native Americans being driven off their lands and on the minority issues of yesterday and today.

South applied for the grant to fund the talk and other campus community activities that are part of a year-long initiative by Indiana Humanities that is titled "One State/One Story." It is centered around the popular book World of Wonders: In Praise of Fireflies, Whale Sharks, and Other Astonishments by popular poet-essayist Aimee Nezhukumatathil.

The Indiana Humanities website explains: "We encourage Hoosiers across the state to pick up World of Wonders to connect and reflect upon the natural world and find your own wonders in Indiana's landscapes."

Garcia's talk is additionally sponsored by the IU East Office of Sustainability and the Campus Library.

It is intended to be educational and to invite discussion.

The presentation is part of Earth Week activities on campus (April 16-22).

Other activities are planned as part of the Indiana Humanities initiative and the grant that IU East received. They include community readings of World of Wonders (free copies are available) and a virtual scavenger hunt for students, whether they take classes on campus or online. The World of Wonders Scavenger Hunt is April 1-22.

"The students go out and do different activities. They could take photos, plant a tree or visit a state park," said South, who is a member of the Sustainability Council at IU East. "No matter where they are, they can participate. We are always working on more opportunities for outreach."

She believes that streaming the presentation is helpful in other ways of outreach: It's available for anyone to watch and it provides a way for the speaker to reach a wide audience without having to travel.

The connection with Indiana Humanities – its programs and speaker's bureau – is a natural, South said.

"A lot of their programs intersect with libraries. We are small enough that we can easily connect … They are big on trying to get Hoosiers to read, engage and think. They really focus on sustainability and the environment," South said.

South applied for the grant in September. IU East is one of 31 non-profits that received one.

Join the event on IU East Facebook Live

Lee Ann Adams Heart of a Teacher Scholarship Honors Faculty Member's Beloved Profession

Posted April 4, 2022

The newly established Lee Ann Adams Heart of a Teacher Scholarship will support students at Indiana University East pursuing the profession of teaching, exemplify the idea that teaching is an act of service, and encourage others to give.

The IU East School of Education (SoE), along with family members and close friends of Lee Ann Adams, established the scholarship in honor of the 29-year faculty member. They did so in secret, and revealed the scholarship to Adams during what seemed to be a regularly scheduled staff meeting held on Zoom.

Adams, lecturer and reading specialist for the SoE, has designed and taught multiple courses in reading comprehension, grammar, test taking and writing. She is also a long-time instructor for First-Year Seminar, a course to help students transition to college and succeed in their first semester at IU East. She plans to retire at the end of the academic year.

For Adams, teaching is about her students. She comes from a family of teachers, including her grandmother, Elizabeth Spiker, who Adams credits as the inspiration for their "beloved profession." Adams herself started teaching at an early age, teaching her stuffed animals, dolls and her three younger sisters—whether they wanted to "play school" or not. Many other family members are also educators.

"Students have always come first for me," Adams said. "What I am really most touched about is the scholarship name. Teachers must have that 'heart.' You can't be a good teacher if you don't establish relationships with students, and that's what I've enjoyed so much about all my years in the classroom."

Jerry Wilde, dean of the School of Education, said the scholarship is one way SoE can honor Adams and her work before she retires.

"Lee Ann Adam's legacy will be dozens, perhaps hundreds, of students who have graduated and gone onto successful careers because of her direct support," Wilde said. "Time and time again, she has tutored, encouraged, supported, and helped students overcome hurdles to reach their goals. The scholarship is named the Lee Ann Adams Heart of a Teacher Scholarship because Lee Ann cares deeply about each and every one of her students."

Wilde, Jamie Buffington-Adams and Josh Tolbert all cohesively came up with the idea of the surprise scholarship to honor Adams.

Tolbert, special education faculty, said this just seemed like the most fitting and natural thing to do to honor Adams.

"When the idea of a scholarship to honor Lee Ann came up, it was basically as if everyone involved was thinking the same thought simultaneously and everyone just agreed that it was something that needed to happen," Tolbert said.

Buffington-Adams is the associate dean and associate professor of education. She said the scholarship was initiated to honor what is greatest about Adams, the heart she has for teaching.

"She exemplifies what it means for teaching to be an act of service as she works diligently and patiently to identify students' needs and provide them with the tools to pursue their dreams. It has been an honor working alongside her and learning from her example," Buffington-Adams said.

Supplied Photo:  Lee Ann Adams
Lee Ann Adams
Lee Ann Adams is a lecturer and reading specialist for the IU East School of Education. In honor of Adams' retirement and service to the school and IU East, the School of Education has established the Lee Ann Adams Heart of a Teacher Scholarship.

Terry Wiesehan, director of Alumni Relations, worked with the SoE to begin raising funds for the seed money. In her role with the university, Wiesehan additionally works with the Office of Gift Development, with both offices falling under the purview of the Office of External Affairs at IU East.

Now, the seed is planted for the Lee Ann Adams Heart of a Teacher Scholarship, having raised over $9,800. However, the School of Education now hopes to see contributions increase to meet its $25,000 goal.

Wiesehan said writing the gift agreement is special to her as a colleague of Adams. Earlier in their careers at IU East, Adams and Wiesehan worked together for the Office of Tutorial Services.

"Lee Ann means so much to me," Wiesehan said. "I'm very honored to be able to do this. This has gone far beyond what we had anticipated, just seeding this scholarship, and that's because we love Lee Ann."

While at IU East, Adams has also worked with the IU East School of Nursing, now the School of Nursing and Health Sciences, to assist nursing students preparing to take the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (N-CLEX) licensing exam.

In 2021, Adams received the Helen Lees Teaching Award, an honor in recognition of Professor Emeritus Lees who passed away in 1992. Her spirit continues in this annual award to honor a full-time faculty member who has taught at least 10 semesters at IU East. "Helen Lees was my first mentor at IU East when I taught here as an adjunct in the 1980's, so I was even more honored to be presented this award," added Adams.

Adams has received additional campus honors including the 1995 IU East Student Government outstanding Service to Students Award, the 2009 Community Council on Disability Awareness Employee of the Year, IU East Employ

ee of the Year in 2000, and the IU School of Nursing Alumni Association Special Recognition Award in 2003.

In all, Adams has been a professional teacher for 50 years.

Prior to joining IU East, Adams taught adults in Columbus, Ohio, and for Richmond Community Schools at Hibberd Middle School. She began her teaching career in Yorktown, Virginia.

Adams received her Master in Education and Bachelor of Science in Education from Ohio University. She is a board member of Richmond Friends School and the board president for the Independent Living Center of Eastern Indiana.

As she looks toward retirement, Adams plans to stay involved at IU East including with the SoE and perhaps continuing to tutor students. She also plans to work with younger students on reading skills at Richmond Friends School, to garden and to perhaps, do a little travel with her sisters and visit her son, John, and his wife, Megan, at their home and vineyard in Oregon.

Tolbert said he hopes this scholarship will give promising teachers motivation and opportunity to pursue a career in education.

"This scholarship should allow aspiring teachers to inform their emerging craft with the wisdom, empathy, and pedagogical expertise that have characterized Lee Ann's career. In some way, I like to think of this scholarship as Lee Ann continuing to guide our future teachers safely and successfully on their journeys, as she has done for all these years at IU East," Tolbert said.

Throughout her time at IU East, Adams has been a dedicated teacher going above and beyond to help students to reach their fullest potential. Among those attributes are preparing students to tackle advanced coursework; bolstering their proficiency in reading, writing and test-taking skills; and helping many students as they face the struggles of college to overcome those challenges to achieve their dreams.

"With nearly 30 years of service to IU East, our hope is that this scholarship cements Lee Ann's legacy by providing financial support to students who have a heart for service, for teaching, and for walking alongside others to help them realize their dreams," Buffington-Adams said. "I can't think of a better way to celebrate the magnitude of Lee Ann's impact on so many people's lives."

How to Contribute to the Lee Ann Adams Heart of a Teacher Scholarship

Contributions to the Lee Ann Adams Heart of a Teacher Scholarship can be made online at myiu.org by following these steps: Click on 'Give Now'. Click on 'Make a Gift'. Type 'Heart of a Teacher' in the search all funds area.

Questions? Please contact Terry Wiesehan, director of Alumni Relations, at twieseha@iue.edu, or Paula Kay King, director of Gift Development, at pkayking@iue.edu or (765) 973-8331.

Return of Preble County Business Expo Made Free for Visitors Courtesy of Reid Health

Posted April 4, 2022

After two years off because of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Preble County Chamber of Commerce's annual Business Expo will return next month, and Reid Health is helping make it happen.

The expo will take place 3-8 p.m. Friday, April 8 and 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday, April 9 at the Expo Center on the Preble County Fairgrounds in Eaton, Ohio. Although admission has been charged in the past, the event is free for visitors this year thanks to Reid covering the costs.

Everyone is encouraged to attend both days to connect with the health system's providers, grab exclusive goodies, check out demonstrations, get free health screenings such as blood pressure/glucose checks and oxygen saturation levels, and more.

Reid will have a number of providers and services represented in its own section of the Expo Center, including Reid Eaton Family & Specialty Care with Kimberly Reffitt, NP, on hand Friday and Amy Goff, DO, and Carrie Kerby, NP, on Saturday.

Other Reid services that will be present include:

  • Reid Health Urgent Care - Eaton
  • Reid OB/GYN - Eaton and Family Birthing Center
  • Reid Allergy
  • Reid Comprehensive Bone & Joint Center
  • Reid Health Continuum of Care
  • Reid Dermatology
  • Reid ENT
  • Reid Gastroenterology
  • Reid General Surgeons with Sylvester Osayi, MD, appearing Saturday
  • Reid Hearing Center with Laura Fragomeni, AuD, and Kyle Langfitt, AuD, on hand Friday and Stacy Borden, AuD, and Alexandria Ulrich, AuD, on Saturday
  • Reid Health Laboratory
  • Reid Health Medical Fitness
  • Reid Oncology Associates
  • Reid Pulmonary Care with Anthony Vacca, DO, available Friday
  • Reid Health Radiology
  • Reid Sleep Disorder Center
  • Reid Telehealth

Typically, the Business Expo features some 100 vendors in the form of nonprofits, service groups, and other organizations as well as businesses representing industries such as healthcare, fitness, landscaping, home repair, construction, banking, insurance, and more.

Food will be available on site, and attendees can sign up for promotional items and purchase from the Chamber raffle tickets for door prizes.

Reid Health Lifting Many COVID-Related Visitor Restrictions

Posted April 4, 2022

With COVID-19 spread at a low point, Reid Health will lift many of its visitor restrictions next week, returning to guidelines that more closely resemble those in place before the pandemic.

Effective at 7 a.m. Monday, April 4, limits on the number of visitors for patients at the hospital will be removed in many care locations. Exceptions will include but are not limited to:

Emergency Department: The pre-pandemic rule of no more than two visitors will be reimplemented. Space constraints and the needs of providing emergency care require a limitation on the number of visitors in that location.

COVID-positive patients: Some visitation restrictions will exist for those who have or are suspected to have COVID-19.

For the safety of everyone, visitors to the hospital will continue to be screened for COVID-19 symptoms and must still wear a surgical mask that covers both their nose and mouth at all times while in the facility.

Anyone arriving between the hours of 9 p.m. and 5 a.m. will continue to check in at the Visitor Access Control station in the Emergency Department entrance.

Effective at 7 a.m. Monday, April 4, limits on the number of visitors for patients at the hospital will be removed in many care locations.

"Our patients and families have endured much over the past two years as we have worked hard to put policies in place to maintain a safe environment for them, our team members, and the larger communities that we serve while allowing for needed personal connections," said Reid Health President/CEO Craig Kinyon.

"But to truly reach the end of this pandemic, we must continue to follow the CDC guidelines. These guidelines provide the source of information to assist everyone in making their personal decision to be fully vaccinated, as well as being up to date with their recommended booster vaccinations.

"Cases are low now, but to ensure they remain so, we need as many people as possible to do their part."

Vaccinations/booster shots

FREE primary doses and booster shots of the vaccine are available at the Reid Health Residency Clinic, 795 Sim Hodgin Parkway in Richmond.

Walk-ins are welcome from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday-Thursday and 8 a.m. to noon Friday. Appointments can be made for those hours by calling Reid's COVID-19 Hotline at (765) 965-4200. The hotline is open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. seven days a week.

Indiana residents can find other nearby vaccination sites and schedule a time at those locations by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.

Providers are required by the federal government to bill an administrative fee to insurance carriers for vaccinations, but patients do not have to pay that fee or any portion of it that goes unpaid by their insurance company.

Get the latest COVID-19 stats from Reid Health, now updated every Monday.

For more information about COVID-19 and vaccinations, go to the Safe Pathways to Care page on the Reid Health website.

INFocus Candidate Forms Begin April 7th on Whitewater Community Television

Posted March 31, 2022

Supplied Flyer: IN Focus Candidate ScheduleWhitewater Community Television, in cooperation with Hometown Media Group and the Wayne County Area Chamber of Commerce will host four IN Focus candidate forums during the month of April so community members can hear from the candidates running in contested races in the May 3rd primary election.

IN Focus is Whitewater Community Television's weekly public affair program that has been airing since April of 2014. The IN Focus time slot has been used for candidate forums for both the primary and general elections since the program's inception. This year, the IN Focus candidate forums normally hosted by regular show host and WCTV Executive Director Eric Marsh, will instead be hosted by Dr. Mengie Parker. Dr. Parker is Director of Institutional Effectiveness and Professor of Criminal Justice for Indiana University East. Dr. Parker has also hosted the IU East legislative forums both live and since the forums have moved to the WCTV studio during at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Candidates for the following races have been invited to participate in the IN Focus candidate forums as follows:

  • Thursday, April 7th 6 to 7pm Candidates for Wayne County Auditor
  • Thursday, April 7th 7 to 8pm Candidates for Wayne County Council, District 3
  • Thursday, April 14th 6 to 7pm Candidates for Wayne County Commissioner, District 1
  • Thursday, April 21st 6 to 7pm Candidates for Indiana House of Representatives, District 56

These forums will air live on WGTV, Channel 11 (on Comcast cable in most of Wayne County). The shows will also stream live on WCTV's Facebook page as well as on WGTV Online, WCTV's Video on Demand and streaming site available here: https://www.wgtv.viebit.com. Replays of the forums will be available on WGTV on the regular IN Focus schedule: Thursdays at 10:30pm, Fridays at 8pm, Saturdays at 8am and 9pm and Sunday's at 8am and 1pm. Audio replays of the program can be heard Sunday mornings at 6am on G101.3 and ESPN Radio 1490AM/100.9FM WKBV.

Questions for the candidates will be taken live during the program on the WCTV Facebook page as well as on twitter @WCTVinfo. Questions for candidates will be taken via email until 2pm the day of the show at wctv@iue.edu.

Whitewater Community Television, Hometown Media Group and the Wayne County Area Chamber will also again host a live election night program beginning at 6pm, Tuesday May 3rd from the campus of IU East. More details on that program will be released closer to primary election night.

Richmond Family YMCA Soccer Registration Ends April 2nd

Posted March 31, 2022

Stock Photo: Child's foot kicking soccer ball.Outdoor Soccer is designed to introduce the game of soccer in a fun, positive atmosphere that is conducive to learning the fundamentals of the game.

Registration for Spring Outdoor Soccer ends Saturday, April 2nd.

Members: $35; Non Members: $50

Click here to Register Now

Good Friday Breakfast at the Richmond Family YMCA

Posted March 31, 2022

The Richmond Family YMCA is announcing our community-wide faith based event honoring Good Friday on April 15th. The breakfast will include a buffet breakfast, fellowship, special music and a speech from 1968 RHS graduate Steve Helmich. Helmich plated for the undefeated 1967 RHS State Championship football team coached by Hub Etchison. Helmich went on to play for Indiana University and later served as a head football coach at West Lafayette and Noblesville High Schools. Helmich's work history includes the Richmond YMCA, Richmond Chamber of Commerce, Columbus Chamber of Commerce, Cathedral High School and IHSAA Foundation. Helmich's faith has been important in all aspects of his personal life and professional career.

Tickets are limited and are going fast! Tickets are available at the YMCA front desk or over the phone, 765-962-7504.

This breakfast will be held at the Elks Country Club from 7:30 AM - 9:00 AM.

Learn More About the Reid Health PACE Center at Medical Monday

Posted March 30, 2022

Supplied Photo: Patrick Anderson, MD and Melissa Gallager, NPApril's edition of Medical Monday will focus on the Reid Health PACE Center, which helps those age 55 and older who meet certain enrollment criteria to maintain their independence at home while receiving customized medical services.

On April 11, Patrick Anderson, MD, PACE Medical Director, and Melissa Gallagher, NP, will present "PACE 101 and Q&A" at Central United Methodist Church in Richmond.

Medical Monday is free to attend and will begin at 1 p.m. at the church, 1425 E. Main St. To register, call Sharrie Harlin Davis at (765) 983-3000, ext. 4676. Masks are required to attend.

Medical Monday is supported by Reid Health Community Benefit. Harlin Davis started the event when she was working for the Minority Health Coalition and maintained it after joining Reid Health. The event has a loyal following, averaging 40 to 50 guests each month to learn about various health issues, community programs, and health screenings.

Cope Environmental Center Announces Camp Schedule

Posted March 30, 2022

Logo:  Cope Environmental Center

It is hard to believe that summer is just around the corner and Cope has some exciting camps planned for pre-k through high school students. Explore our wetlands, develop outdoor survival skills, show off your creative streak through crafts, camp overnight, and so much more. No matter what your interests are, we have a camp for you.

Find the full schedule of camps at https://www.copeenvironmental.org/summer-camp/ or download our Summer Adventure Camp flyer for 2022!

Leader of the Pack Announces June 2022 Retirement

Posted March 30, 2022

When Indiana University East Chancellor Kathy Girten talks with others about the Richmond campus, she has two attributes she regularly shares.

First, IU East is a family.

Second, as a steward of place, Girten and IU East are deeply committed to serving the community and region.

Family and steward of place are also two of the legacies she will leave as she retires at the end of this academic year.

Chancellor Girten announced today that she plans to retire June 30, 2022. Currently, she is also serving as the acting chancellor for IU Southeast. Girten was named IU East's first female, and sixth chancellor, in February 2013.

"It is my great honor to serve as the sixth chancellor of IU East," Girten said. "While this academic year is my last as the leader for this campus, I am as dedicated today as I was in 2013 to see the students, faculty, and staff flourish through academic excellence, innovation and service to community in an unprecedented time."

Angie Dickman, chair of IU East's Board of Advisors, has worked closely with Girten throughout her time as chancellor. Dickman is a vice president at Reid Health.

"Chancellor Girten's retirement announcement certainly brings mixed emotions," Dickman said. "While I am so happy for her, as she has earned this next chapter in her life, she will be dearly missed. Her ability to engage with all of IU East's stakeholders – as well as with the community at-large – is a unique gift. IU East is an exemplary campus in the IU system, and her leadership is a big reason for its success. I am blessed to consider her a colleague and a friend."

Supplied Photo:  Kathy GirtenIU East Chancellor Kathy Girten will retire June 30, 2022.

In one of her first acts as chancellor, Girten chose to have her installation ceremony in the Historic Depot District of Richmond, strengthening the campus and community connection. The Installation Ceremony, "A Steward of Place," was held on October 25, 2013, in a moderately renovated, Historic Pennsylvania Railroad Depot.

The depot building, constructed in 1902, has since undergone a full renovation. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, and is now thriving under owners Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate First Realty Group, LLC.

IU East chose the depot for Girten's installation due to its history and symbolism of the university's connection and commitment to the community, connecting longstanding traditions and symbols to the promises of a bright and inspiring future, and a bright and inspiring future. Girten and IU East are deeply committed to serving the community and region, a vital component of the university's mission to meet the needs for higher education and to foster a growing economy.

Connection to IU East is something that Girten says she will maintain even after retirement.

"When I became chancellor, I felt very welcome in the community, and it seemed like home immediately," Girten said. "My husband Gary and I plan to stay here and continue to enjoy all that Wayne County has to offer."

Joining the Pack

Prior to joining IU East, Girten was provost and vice president for Academic Affairs at California State University. She moved over 2,400 miles from Monterey Bay, California, to Richmond to continue developing the campus and enhancing its four-year and graduate degree programs; to fulfill the educational mission to the community and to contribute to the cultural and economic development of the region.

"One of my first impressions of IU East is that the students, faculty and staff here interacted more like a family than a campus community, and that impression has only strengthened over time," Girten said. "I have also had many great opportunities to participate in local art shows at Richmond Art Museum, attend concerts of the Richmond Symphony Orchestra, and to be a part of several in-depth and valuable discussions that will lead to a brighter future for IU East and Wayne County."

When she became chancellor, Girten was married to Eugene Cruz-Uribe, who passed away unexpectedly in March 2018. He was an Egyptologist and a member of the faculty at IU East before he retired in 2017.

Girten married Gary Girten during a private, home ceremony in March 2020.

During the nine years as chancellor at IU East, Girten has achieved many of the objectives she first laid out during her installation, and continued to build on in the time since.

IU East Achievements

Record enrollment: IU East continued its trend of increasing enrollment under Girten's leadership. Highlights in record enrollment include welcoming the largest, most diverse incoming freshmen class in 2018. In addition, that same year, the headcount enrollment was over 3,700 students taking more than 38,000 credit hours.

Record Graduation Numbers: The number of degrees awarded has steadily increased while Girten has been chancellor. The Class of 2013 received 626 bachelor's and master's degrees, and the Class of 2020 was awarded 853. Despite COVID-19 students persevered and the Class of 2021 was awarded 811 degrees.

Record four-year and six-year graduation rates: Graduation rates for full-time, beginning bachelor's seeking students have increased to record levels, with the 4 year official rate consistently the highest of all the IU regional campuses.

Additionally, Girten has led the campus in other areas as well, resulting in receiving the highest percentage increases in performance funding state appropriations.

Increase in diversity: Increasing diversity and inclusion efforts on campus has been an over-arching goal for Girten. The diversity of students on the IU East campus continues to increase setting a record headcount enrollment of degree-seeking students in 2018. Diversity and inclusion are top priorities for Girten, as outlined in the strategic plan. Under Girten, the campus hired a new Chief Diversity Officer/Special Assistant to the Chancellor. The Diversity Commission also changed to the Diversity and Inclusion Committee with a revamped focus to support campus units in their diversity work and to implement the campus diversity plan.

Introduction of new degrees focused on career advancement, civic engagement and global stewardship such as accounting, Spanish, applied health sciences, informatics, data science and graduate programs in liberal studies, criminal justice and public safety, and more. In all nine new undergraduate programs and six master's degrees and nine collaborative online graduate certificates have been added to IU East's portfolio while Girten has been chancellor. Additionally, she is the only chancellor to serve as the regional campus representative to the Online Advisory Council since 2014, representing the needs and concerns of IU East as well as the other regional campuses.

Campus expansion and improvements: Over the past eight years, IU East has undergone several projects to enhance the campus grounds and buildings to better serve students and the community. One of the most significant projects is the campus' completion of its fifth building, the Student Events Center (SEC) in August 2016. At the SEC's opening celebration, Girten reiterated the importance of the IU East family, and the impact of close connections and working together brings positive change for the region.

"Together, we comprise one big family working to improve our region," she said.

While the SEC is a main highlight, the last eight years have brought about improvements across campus to nearly every area students interact, learn or receive services. Several areas, classrooms, office suites, facilities and operating systems have been renovated or improved.

Girten also maintained close relationships with community partners.

Additional notable accomplishments:

  • IU East completed converting the heating system in Whitewater Hall to a hot water system to improve efficiency and cost effectiveness, is now nearing completion of the second phase;
  • Renovation of Vivian Auditorium to update sound technology, seating, carpeting and appearance, was completed in June 2020;
  • Maintained and strengthened the partnership with the Women's Tennis Benefits Association (WTBA) and Women's Tennis Association (WTA) partnership. Currently, 15 WTA players have earned their degrees and graduated during Girten's tenure including Venus Williams, Sloane Stephens, Alla Kudryavtseva, Irina Falconi, Katalin Marosi, Sandra Zaniewska, Ivana Lisjak, Anastasia Rodionova, Madga Linette, Nicole Melichar, Teodora Mircic, Shelby Rogers and Vicky Duval.
  • Increased the number of athletic teams at IU East to 16, including the addition of the most recent varsity esports program beginning this fall. IU East now offers 15 men's and women's sports programs, and the coed esports program.
  • Additional all gender restrooms and a wellness room for nursing mothers were constructed in Hayes Hall in spring 2019.
  • Constructed an active learning collaborative classroom in Springwood Hall that features 10 collaboration stations and two large projection screens that display content from any of the stations, empowering small groups and the class to collaborate for a more immersive experience. Named the Kathryn and Eugene Cruz-Uribe Interactive Classroom in 2018 in recognition of Chancellor Girten's and the late Gene Cruz-Uribe's generosity through campus philanthropy.
  • Naming of the First Bank Richmond Community Room in 2018 to recognize the partnership in the dedication to the region for higher education and economic development.
  • Ongoing renovations to office suites for Academic Affairs, Administration and Finance, Admissions, Athletics, Bursar, Center for Health Promotion, Financial Aid, Registrar and more. Constructed student group study rooms in the Information Commons, upgraded the campus IT network and infrastructure; remodeled library spaces for the Center for Faculty Development and the Community Engagement Commons.
  • Construction of a multi-modal path from Chester Boul
  • vard into the main campus for student safety and a bridge from Springwood Hall to the Student Events Center in 2018.
  • Began the construction of a unique, outdoor Archeology Lab providing hands-on experiences for students to explore and excavate, and to connect multidisciplinary elements for all students used to teach history, sociology and other social and behavioral sciences in fall 2018.
  • Renovation of Whitewater Lobby to enhance the space and improve the lobby's energy efficiency and technology, completed renovation September 2017.
  • Construction of the Arts Annex in 2017, providing space for metalsmithing and sculpture courses.
  • Renovated and named the Tom Thomas Gallery in Whitewater Hall in October 2015 in memorandum of Thomas (1945-2009), an IU East associate professor of fine arts, the founder of the Whitewater Valley Art Competition (WVAC) and a renowned artist.
  • Quad renovation in August 2014 providing a more amiable space for campus gatherings and events through improving drainage in the center of campus; added landscaping with a rain garden and new perimeter trees, lit pergola, and replacement of inner sidewalks, and sculpture pads for the Outdoor Sculpture Exhibit.
  • Installed the first Outdoor Sculpture Exhibit in September 2013, now on its third juried installation.
  • Improved parking with additional 70 new spaces to the Hayes Hall parking lot with the project completed in January 2014;

Girten also led the IU East campus during two years of the COVID-19 pandemic, ensuring the faculty and staff were prepared to deliver high-quality education as all classes and courses moved to a virtual learning platform early on in the onset of COVID-19. IU East is familiar with virtual instruction, having been an early adopter of online education at IU. Along with all virtual-instruction, the campus experienced many firsts during the pandemic, including its first virtual Commencement Celebration for the Class of 2020 and its first virtual New Student Orientations to welcome the Class of 2024.

Philanthropy

During Girten's leadership, IU East received record philanthropic support, and in September 2020, was successful in the completion of For All: The Indiana University Bicentennial Campaign. IU East received nearly $8 million in new philanthropy during the campaign, including 46 new scholarships.

When it comes to philanthropy, Girten leads by example.

She and her late husband, Gene, provided financial support to assist with the construction of the Student Events and Activities Center. To recognize their generosity, the campus dedicated the Chancellor Kathryn Cruz-Uribe and Eugene Cruz-Uribe Interactive Classroom located in Springwood Hall. A second gift to IU East established the "Gloria & Joseph Allwarden and Lillian & Antonio Cruz-Uribe Scholarship," to honor her and Gene's parents. The chancellor gives regularly to IU East, and she and her late husband were inducted into the Indiana University Foundation's Presidents Circle in 2018.

Community Organizations and Partnerships

As chancellor, Girten has continued the longstanding partnerships in place while establishing new partnerships and initiatives to benefit the campus and community. The most recent partnership established the College Now program to benefit area high school students by providing free college-credit courses that in turn, introduce them to the college environment, stimulate learning and encourage future academic achievement. College Now is available to all six Wayne County high schools.

The arts is one area that holds a special place for Girten. An artist herself, she has found ways to intertwine her passion and volunteerism to benefit the fine arts department, non-profits in the region and to bring awareness to the arts and campus. One such example is Palette to Palate, created by IU East and Richmond Art Museum. Proceeds from this collaborative fundraiser benefit the RAM programming and the IU East Department of Fine and Performing Arts.

In 2018, IU East partnered with Randolph County Schools, and the Community Foundation of Randolph County on the "Walk into My Future" event held on campus. This is an important part of the Randolph County Promise, a program to help third-grade students and their parents open a College Choice 529 Direct Savings plan, which may be used to pay for education beyond high school. The program is preparing for its fourth year.

Girten also joined the 2021 Preble Arts fundraiser, "Bad Art, Good Folk," and entered a pastel painting of the Richmond Rose Garden for auction.

The campus received the Wayne County Area Chamber of Commerce Achievement of Excellence, Non Profit, Growth and Expansion award in 2014 in recognition of the campus' continued enrollment growth, development of graduate programs, and plans to construct the Student Events Center, now open for its sixth year. In 2016, IU East also received the Chamber's "Corporation of the Year" award.

Girten has been very involved in the Wayne County community, and is honored to have received the Wayne County Area Chamber of Commerce Art Vivian Distinguished Community Leader Award in 2020, as well as the Community Achievement Award from Amigos in 2018.

Girten was a member of the Wayne County Area Chamber of Commerce board from 2013 – 2021 (chair in 2016), and was also a member of the Forward Wayne County steering committee. She currently serves on the boards of First Bank Richmond, the First Bank Richmond Community Foundation (vice president/treasurer), Reid Health, the Richmond Art Museum (second vice president), the Richmond Symphony Orchestra (immediate past president) and the Wayne County Foundation (vice chair).

While at IU East, Girten became part of the family, all while seeing her own family grow. She has become a grandmother, and extended her family to include the Girtens, and many faculty, staff, students, alumni and community members, as well as the greater IU family.

Girten said she has enjoyed her time as chancellor. She is looking forward to spending time with her family, especially her granddaughter, when she retires.

The Girtens plan to remain in Richmond.

"Being a part of this family, this Pack, has been a joy. I have so loved my time at IU East. I know I always say that IU East is like a family, and it has certainly been a family to me," Girten said. "I'm excited about the new leadership of Indiana University, and IU East remains a strong and vibrant campus with wonderful faculty, staff, students and alumni. I am confident we will continue to thrive. I thank our campus and community for their commitment to our students, and to our campus."

Susan Sciame-Giesecke, Indiana University vice president for regional campuses and online education, will be in touch with campus and community constituents as she moves forward with the process of searching for a new chancellor.

If You're 45 or Older, You Should Get Screened for Colorectal Cancer

Posted March 30, 2022

With COVID-19 dominating health-related headlines for the past two-plus years, you might have missed an important piece of news announced last May about an adjustment in the timing of colorectal cancer screenings.

Last year, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force lowered the recommended age to begin testing for colorectal cancer from 50 years old to 45.

Every year, some 140,000 people in the United States are diagnosed with colorectal cancer with more than 52,000 Americans dying from the disease. That makes colorectal cancer the second-leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the country among cancers that affect both men and women.

Despite that, only about two-thirds of adults in the U.S. are up to date with their colorectal cancer screenings.

"Forty-five is the new 50," said Naeem Raza, MD, Reid Gastroenterology. "Colorectal cancer is the second-leading cancer killer, but it doesn't have to be.

"Take control of your life and get screened. Don't wait."

Undergoing a screening helps find precancerous abnormal growths called polyps in the colon and rectum so they can be removed before they turn into cancer. If cancer already is present, getting screened helps to find the problem early when treatment works best.

"Forty-five is the new 50. Colorectal cancer is the second-leading cancer killer, but it doesn't have to be. Take control of your life and get screened. Don't wait." -- Naeem Raza, MD, Reid Gastroenterology The risk for colorectal cancer rises as you age. Other factors including inflammatory bowel diseases such as Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis, a personal or family history of colorectal cancer or colorectal polyps, or some genetic syndromes can increase your likelihood for colorectal cancer.

Anyone between the ages of 45 and 75 should be screened. Those 76 and older should discuss with their primary care provider whether a screening is right for them. If you have an immediate relative who has had colorectal cancer, you should get your first screening at age 40 or 10 years younger than the earliest diagnosis within your family, whichever comes first.

There are several test options with the best known being a colonoscopy, which should be done every 10 years for those who aren't at a higher risk for colorectal cancer and who remain symptom-free. Other options include stool tests, a flexible sigmoidoscopy, and a CT colonography. Ask your doctor which test is best for you.

To learn more about colorectal cancer and colonoscopies, check out the Reid Health website.

New CDC Data Points to Continued Effectiveness of COVID-19 Vaccine, Booster Shots

Posted March 22, 2022

Although COVID-19 spread is low at the moment, the virus has not gone away and those who are still unvaccinated or who aren't up to date on their shots remain vulnerable. Newly released data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows just how much you can protect yourself by getting your primary vaccinations and booster shot.

During the wave of cases caused by the Omicron variant this winter, COVID-19 hospitalization rates rose for all adults -- regardless of vaccination status -- because of the highly transmissible nature of Omicron. But those rates were 12 times higher among adults who were unvaccinated.

For those who not only had their primary vaccine doses but a booster shot as well, the risk of being put on a ventilator because of COVID-19 or dying from the virus was reduced by 94%.

According to the CDC, only about half of those who are eligible for a booster shot have had one. Anyone 12 years and older who received the Pfizer vaccine or 18 and older who received either the Moderna or Johnson & Johnson vaccines can get a booster.

Pfizer and Moderna recipients should have theirs at least five months after their primary series while Johnson & Johnson recipients should have a booster at least two months after their first dose.

Reminder: Walk-in Vaccine Clinic has moved

FREE primary doses and booster shots of the vaccine are available at the Reid Health Residency Clinic, 795 Sim Hodgin Parkway in Richmond.

Walk-ins are welcome from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday-Thursday and 8 a.m. to noon Friday. Appointments can be made for those hours by calling Reid's COVID-19 Hotline at (765) 965-4200. The hotline is open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. seven days a week.

Indiana residents can find other nearby vaccination sites and schedule a time at those locations by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.

Providers are required by the federal government to bill an administrative fee to insurance carriers for vaccinations, but patients do not have to pay that fee or any portion of it that goes unpaid by their insurance company.

Nominations Now Accepted for the LifeStream Golden Hoosier Award

Posted March 22, 2022

LifeStream Services is seeking nominees age 65 or older for the LifeStream Golden Hoosier Award. The community is encouraged to nominate those special volunteers who consistently go above and beyond demonstrating passion and commitment to service in their community.

The nominee must be age 65 or older and currently reside in Blackford, Delaware, Fayette, Franklin, Grant, Henry, Jay, Madison, Randolph, Rush, Union, or Wayne county. The individual must have completed at least three years of volunteer experience after reaching 60 years of age, positively impacting members of the community, an organization, or faith-based organization through volunteer efforts.

A special committee will choose the top 50 nominees and choose the winner of the LifeStream Golden Hoosier Award. This individual will then be nominated for the state of Indiana's prestigious Golden Hoosier Award, which is the highest honor a senior citizen can receive from the state.

Nominations are due no later than April 22 to Laura Bray, LifeStream's Volunteer Services Administrator. Additional information and a nomination form can be accessed by visiting www.lifestreaminc.org/goldenhoosier. Questions? Please call 765-808-8827 or email lbray@lifestreaminc.org.

This award is sponsored by Reid Health Alliance Medicare.

Court of Appeals to Hear Oral Argument in Case at IU East

Posted March 22, 2022

The Court of Appeals of Indiana will hear oral argument at Indiana University East at 10:30 a.m. on Thursday, March 24, in Vivian Auditorium, located in Whitewater Hall.

The Court of Appeals is the second-highest court in Indiana. The Court hears oral arguments across the state to enable Hoosiers to observe the real-world issues that face the court and learn more about the court's indispensable role in Indiana government.

The oral argument is open to the media and public, though seating is limited. Once the oral argument begins further admittance by visitors to Vivian Auditorium will not be permitted. The doors will close at 10:30 a.m. The session will end at 11:30 a.m.

Traveling oral arguments, or Appeals on Wheels, take the court across Indiana to help Hoosiers learn more about the judiciary's indispensable role in Indiana government. They also provide opportunities for Court of Appeals judges to meet and talk with a broad range of citizens in relatively informal settings.

Audiences get to observe skilled legal arguments and advocacy by some of Indiana's best lawyers, against a backdrop of case-specific facts and statutory and constitutional law.

Scott Lee, chair of the Department of Criminal Justice and Political Science and assistant professor of political science at IU East, is coordinating the event with the Court of Appeals.

Lee said hosting the Court of Appeals on campus is a wonderful opportunity for students, faculty, staff, and the community to participate in a judicial branch function.

"Vivian Auditorium becomes, in essence, the courtroom. Not only do we get to see top-notch attorneys advocate for their clients, but we also see how the court operates in real time. The judges normally answer questions after the end of the session and that gives all of us the chance to ask questions directly to the court," Lee said.

Students wishing to eat lunch with the judges after the court session should contact Lee at scottlee@iue.edu to reserve a seat.

The event is sponsored by the IU East School of Humanities and Social Sciences and IU East's chapter of the American Democracy Project.

Court of Appeals Panel and Case Information

A panel consisting of Judge Patricia A. Riley, Judge Melissa S. May and Judge Leanna K. Weissmann will hear the case Donald Johnson v. State of Indiana, 21A-CR-1234.

Donald Johnson appeals the denial of his motion to dismiss 10 of the 17 Class C felony securities-related charges against him. Johnson argues the trial court abused its discretion when it did not dismiss these 10 counts because all relevant charges were filed outside the statute of limitations for the crimes alleged. Additionally, he argues dismissal is warranted because the State did not allege the "knowingly" element of the crimes in its charging information and the charging information are otherwise deficient because they fail to state the relevant offenses with sufficient certainty for Johnson to provide a defense. Finally, Johnson contends the trial court abused its discretion when it denied his motion to dismiss because none of the instruments in question were securities for the purposes of the Indiana Uniform Securities Act.

Media Policy for Court of Appeals of Indiana

Reporters, including student journalists, may ask the Court's permission to record the argument with still or video cameras. Requests should be sent at least 48 hours in advance of the oral argument to Court Administrator Larry Morris at CourtOfAppeals@courts.in.gov.

The following rules will apply:

  • All cameras must be tripod-mounted and the operators must remain in place throughout the hearing.
  • Camera movement is limited to the judges and the arguing attorneys. No audience shots allowed.
  • No flash, strobes, or other distracting lights or sounds are permitted.
  • Video cameras and tape recorders cannot be used during the Q/A period that follows oral argument.
  • Print journalists don't have to ask the Court's permission to cover the argument or the Q/A session.

About Appeals on Wheels

Traveling oral arguments, or Appeals on Wheels, take the court across Indiana to help Hoosiers learn more about the judiciary's indispensable role in Indiana government. They also provide opportunities for Court of Appeals judges to meet and talk with a broad range of citizens in relatively informal settings. Appeals on Wheels typically occur at high schools, colleges, law schools and courtrooms, but they've also been held at conference centers, tourist sites and even retirement communities. The Court has conducted more than 500 Appeals on Wheels since its 2001 centennial, although the program predates the centennial.

Virtual Cinco K (5K) Family Run/Walk

Posted March 14, 2022

Supplied Graphic:  Amigos 5K

Virtual 5K Run/Walk Proceeds will benefit: Amigos, the Richmond Latino Center
Thursday May 5th, 2022 through Thursday May 26th, 2022

Run/walk wherever you want! If you want to compete for 1st, 2nd, or 3rd place, the 5K must be run all at once, timed, and proof of your race (time and distance) must be emailed to karrie@amigoslatinocenter.org and submit your time on the runsignup race page.

Registration:
No onsite registration - register online at https://runsignup.com/Race/IN/Anytown/AmigosVirtualCincodeMayoFamilyRunWalk

Registration fees (non–refundable):
$30 includes t-shirt if registered by Friday, April 8th, 2022
$20 if you are not participating and want a shirt
Shirt not included if registered after April 8th, 2022

***If shipping is required, it is available at a cost of $6.00, however, we cannot guarantee the arrival will be before the race start date, May 5th.

Shirt Pickup:
April 30th, 12:00pm-3:00pm
Morrison-Reeves Library
80 N 6th St, Richmond, IN 47374

Registration or questions, visit: https://runsignup.com/Race/IN/Anytown/AmigosVirtualCincoKFamilyRunWalk

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