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Collaborative Patient Care at Heart of Newly Renamed Reid Health Comprehensive Bone & Joint Center

Posted March 21, 2022

Those driving along U.S. 27 just north of the I-70 interchange in Richmond might have noticed a change in signage recently.

The marker near the entrance to Highland Road no longer carries the Reid Orthopedics Center name. In its place is a new title for the facility, one that takes into account an expanded roster of services and physicians now available at the location.

With more than 20 providers under the same roof, the renamed Reid Health Comprehensive Bone & Joint Center is capable of caring for patients whose health needs include anything from bones, joints, and the spine to hand, podiatry, and sports medicine, whether in a traditional office visit or through a walk-in clinic.

"In the past, we were just an orthopedic center, so we had some of the services we needed to take care of everything inside of musculoskeletal health, but we needed space to grow and to add new kinds of practitioners," said orthopedic surgeon Joel McClurg, MD, PhD, FAAOS.

"We can see more patients with the new space and new providers, but we also tried to set it up so it's an easier flow for the patient. They can come in, get the treatment they need, and get out faster. It's taking better care of the patient more efficiently and having better outcomes in the end, which is really what it's all about."

Recent renovations at 1400 Highland Road have made room for practices to relocate to the facility and have created a collaborative environment for the various specialty services that call the building home.

The guiding principle throughout the process was what would be best for patient care.

"Our podiatry and pain management exam rooms are much closer to our x-ray suite, which means less walking during the visit for patients who are experiencing pain or difficulty with mobility," said Maria Vail, Physician Practice Manager for Reid Health Comprehensive Bone & Joint Center.

"The move also means providers are physically closer to our other specialty providers, allowing them to more easily work together on mutual patients or consult on potential patient referrals."

"We can see more patients with the new space and new providers, but we also tried to set it up so it's an easier flow for the patient. They can come in, get the treatment they need, and get out faster. It's taking better care of the patient more efficiently and having better outcomes in the end, which is really what it's all about." -- Dr. Joel McClurg

Services and specialty care now available at the Comprehensive Bone & Joint Center include:

  • Orthopedics
  • Reid's Ortho Walk-in NOW clinic
  • Spine care
  • Podiatry
  • Hand
  • Pain Management
  • Sports Medicine/Active Lifestyle
  • Reid Health Perioperative Clinic
  • Athletic Training Clinic

"We want our patients to know they are our No. 1 priority," said Monica Schlichter, Musculoskeletal Service Line Director for Reid Health. "We not only want them to get the best care, but we also want to make it easy. With our comprehensive approach, they can see many different specialties all in one place."

The addition of a satellite office for the Reid Health Perioperative Clinic is another way in which specialties are working together to give patients the best possible care.

"We want our patients to know they are our No. 1 priority. We not only want them to get the best care, but we also want to make it easy. With our comprehensive approach, they can see many different specialties all in one place." -- Monica Schlichter, Musculoskeletal Service Line Director

Clinic providers evaluate patients before surgery, using the latest medical research to help identify anyone who might be more at risk for complications. Those who use perioperative services tend to fare much better after procedures such as joint replacement surgeries.

"We're excited to have our partners from our perioperative program with us at the facility. Not only is it a convenience for our patients to have all their pre-surgical needs met in one location, but it offers opportunities for our teams to better work together toward exceptional surgical outcomes," Schlichter said.

Plans for the changes have long been in the works, making it that much more thrilling to see the final product now in place.

"I normally don't get excited about things, but to finally see this all come together is amazing," McClurg said. "The practitioners are excited. The patients are going to be excited. We're thrilled about everything this new space allows us to do."

Thousands of Indiana High Schoolers Earn College Credit Before Graduation

Posted March 21, 2022

New Indiana College Core resources available for schools, educators to increase awareness

(INDIANAPOLIS) – More than 7,500 Hoosier high school students over the past five years have earned the Indiana College Core or an associate degree while still in high school, continuing Indiana's strong support of students taking early college credit with the benefit of students saving time and money toward postsecondary education and training.

Recent data show more than 1,800 students earned the Indiana College Core, and almost 500 students earned an associate degree in 2020 – all while still in high school. Created in 2012, the Indiana College Core is a 30 credit-hour block of general education college-level coursework that transfers to all Indiana public colleges and universities and some private institutions. Indiana students can earn up to a full year of college for $750 or less when they earn the Indiana College Core while in high school.

To continue building awareness around the benefits of the Indiana College Core with high school students, the Indiana Commission for Higher Education and Indiana Department of Education released today a comprehensive digital guide and toolkit. The materials are designed to equip educators, especially school counselors, with the information and tools needed to help students make knowledgeable decisions about earning the Indiana College Core.

"The popularity of the Indiana College Core has grown since its creation with thousands of students earning it each school year," said Indiana Commission for Higher Education Teresa Lubbers. "Our new educator guide and toolkit will increase awareness of the Core and the benefits of earning it. Working in partnership with the Indiana Department of Education, we are making these materials available to high school educators and counselors around the state so more students can take advantage of this opportunity."

Nearly 94 percent of Indiana College Core earners from the class of 2018 went on to attend college. Once at college, those students can focus on major-specific courses earlier than their peers and pursue additional opportunities such as adding a minor and studying abroad. Additionally, they're more likely to graduate on time or early and could pursue graduate school ahead of their peers who didn't earn the Core while in high school.Supplied Logo: IN College Core

While more students are earning the Indiana College Core, gaps remain. Far too few Indiana high schools offer the Core – the Commission estimates that it's currently available at just one in five high schools. The educator guide serves as an informational resource for school administrators to learn how their school can become a provider. It also instructs counselors on how to assist students with earning and transferring the Core.

"It's important that every student has access to pathways throughout their K-12 education that prepare them for what's next after high school – whether that's employment, enrollment or enlistment leading to service," said Indiana Secretary of Education Dr. Katie Jenner. "Completing the Indiana College Core while still in high school can help our students open doors by earning a degree or credential, saving them time and money. Expanding access to the Indiana College Core at all Indiana schools – rural, urban and suburban – can be a game-changer for our students while also strategically setting the foundation for increasing educational attainment in communities across our state."

The toolkit features plug-and-play resources such as an email template, social media posts, a short informational video and website content to be used to explain the Indiana College Core to students and parents. Counselors also have access to a fillable course offering list, making it clear to students and parents which courses qualify for the Core.

The guide and toolkit are located on LearnMoreIndiana.com, along with a variety of other resources designed specifically for K-12 counselors and educators.

For more information about dual credit and credit transfer, visit TransferIN.net.

Beat the Heat Community Meeting

Posted March 21, 2022

Supplied Flyer: Beat the Heat Community Meetings

The City of Richmond is hosting four public meetings to gain community insight on the City's Heat Management Strategy being developed for Summer 2022. The Heat Management Strategy is a part of the City's "Beat the Heat" program.

The "Beat the Heat" program is a two-year, grant-funded initiative created by the Indiana University Environmental Resilience Institute and funded by the Indiana University Office of Community and Rural Affairs, Reid Health, and the City of Richmond. The "Beat the Heat" program works to help the City of Richmond deal with the public health impacts of extreme heat.

At the upcoming public meetings, community members can learn more about the "Beat the Heat" program and provide ideas and input on the Heat Management Strategy as it is being developed. The public meetings will be hosted in two rounds and will include both in-person and virtual meetings. The in-person and virtual meetings in each round will contain the same information.

The first round of meetings will share the results of community input gathered over the past few months and paint a larger picture of the impact of extreme heat on the Richmond community. The second round of meetings will be focused on reviewing a draft version of the Heat Management Strategy and allowing attendees to provide their feedback on that draft.

In-Person meetings will be held in the 3rd floor council chambers at the Richmond Municipal Building (50 N 5th Street, Richmond, IN 47374).

  • Register for the virtual meetings here: www.tinyurl.com/BTHvirtualmeeting
  • Round 1 Meetings: Presentation of Community Needs
    • In-Person: Wednesday, March 23rd from 7 – 8 pm
    • Virtual: Tuesday, March 29th from 6 - 7 pm
  • Round 2 Meetings: Presentation of Draft Strategy
    • In-Person: Tuesday, April 19th from 7 – 8 pm
    • Virtual: Monday, April 25th from 6 – 7 pm

Starr-Gennett Foundation Announces Dates for "Music at the Club"

Posted March 17, 2022

The Starr-Gennett Foundation would like to announce the 2022 schedule for Music at the Club which will be hosted at Forest Hills Country Club on the following Fridays this summer: June 17, July 8, August 5 and September 2.

The doors open at 6 p.m. for dinner that can be ordered from a special Forest Hills menu; the music, directed by Steve Mathews with a variety of musicians, begins at 7 p.m.

Reservations are not necessary.

Officers for the Board of Directors for the Starr-Gennett Foundation for 2022 include:

  • President: Chris Daulton
  • Vice president: Doug Borgsdorf
  • Secretary: Amanda Wise
  • Treasurer: Beth Brittenham
  • Historian: Linda Gennett-Irmscher

COVID-19 Vaccination Clinic at Lingle Grand Hall Will Close

Posted March 17, 2022

With the pace of COVID-19 vaccinations at Reid Health near a pandemic low, the health system will close its vaccine clinic at Lingle Grand Hall on the main campus in Richmond at the end of the day on Friday, March 18.

Those who still wish to receive the FREE primary doses and booster shots of the vaccine will be able to do so at the Reid Health Residency Clinic, 795 Sim Hodgin Parkway in Richmond, beginning Monday, March 21.

Walk-ins will be available from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday-Thursday and 8 a.m. to noon Friday. Appointments can be made for those hours by calling Reid's COVID-19 Hotline at (765) 965-4200. The hotline is open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. seven days a week.

Indiana residents can find other nearby vaccination sites and schedule a time at those locations by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.

Since COVID-19 vaccinations first became available in December 2020, Reid Health has operated a number of vaccination locations at sites large and small, making adjustments as demand for the shots rose and fell.

Over the past few months, Reid also has worked to make the vaccines available at several primary and specialty care sites for patients of those practices. There is no co-pay or deductible due for vaccine-only services at those practices, but if other medical care is performed at the same time, the usual charges for that care will apply.

Providers are required by the federal government to bill an administrative fee to insurance carriers for vaccinations, but patients do not have to pay that fee or another portion of it that goes unpaid by their insurance company.

Vaccination remains the best protection we have against COVID-19. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), it greatly reduces your risk for severe illness or death, creates a more predictable immune response than "natural immunity" from infection, reduces your likelihood of spreading the virus to those who might be more vulnerable than you, and lessens the chances of new variants emerging and causing more problems.

March 15th's COVID-19 Stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 5
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 3 (60%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 0
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 0
  • Tests submitted since last update: 191
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 15 (7.9% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 14

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are FREE. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you need to be tested for COVID-19, Reid offers drive-thru testing at 1200 Chester Blvd. in Richmond and at 2025 Virginia Ave. in Connersville. Appointments are required at both sites. The Richmond location is open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily while the Connersville location runs 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. To schedule an appointment, call Reid's COVID-19 Hotline.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Senior Adult Ministry March Meeting

Posted March 7, 2022

Supplied Flyer: Yo-yo Extravaganza

The Senior Adult Ministry will feature Pete Beaman and his amazing colletion of Yo-yos on Tuesday, March 29th, at First United Methodist Church, 318 National Road West, Richmond, IN.

Please bring a snack to share with the group if you can.

Invite a friend to enjoy the food and fellowship each month.

Senior Adult Ministry is an active group of seniors over 50 years old open to all regardless of religious affiliation. The group is guided by Pastor Judi Marshall, Clara Bulmer and Beverly Kirby. These three women actively share their gifts of ministry, hospitality and creativity in planning and organizing the monthly meetings.

For further information, call 765-962-4357.

Medical Monday Returns with a Pair of Presentations

Posted March 7, 2022

Wellness and fitness will be the focus when Reid Health's Medical Monday event returns this month after taking January and February off.

The event on March 14 will feature two presentations: "Nutrition Tips for a Healthy Lifestyle" by Tajuan Stoker, Director of Wellness for Reid Health, and "Medical Fitness" by Medical Fitness Manager Matthew Wright and Medical Exercise Specialist Savannah Doherty.

Medical Monday is free to attend and will begin at 1 p.m. at Central United Methodist Church, 1425 E. Main St. in Richmond. To register, call Sharrie Harlin Davis at (765) 983-3000, ext. 4676. Masks are required to attend.

Medical Monday is supported by Reid Health Community Benefit. Harlin Davis started the event when she was working for the Minority Health Coalition and maintained it after joining Reid Health. The event has a loyal following, averaging 40 to 50 guests each month to learn about various health issues, community programs, and health screenings.

Townsend Community Center House Party

Posted March 3, 2022

Supplied Graphic:  House Party

Townsend Community Center, Inc. invites you to join them for a House Party (Age 30+) at the American Legion Post 65, 109 North Sixth Street, Richmond, IN 47374 on Saturday, March 26, 2022 from 8:00 p.m. to 12:00 a.m. Cash bar and food will be available to purchase.

As COVID-19 Masking Guidelines Loosen, Those Still Unvaccinated Remain Vulnerable

Posted March 3, 2022

In recent days, federal health guidelines around masking have changed, lifting recommendations for wearing masks on public transportation and in many other settings -- depending on the rate of COVID-19 spread in your community -- while places providing clinical care, including all Reid Health facilities, still require masking.

But those guideline updates come with an important caveat: If you are still unvaccinated, you remain vulnerable to COVID-19.

Although the number of new cases has fallen recently, we've been here before during the pandemic. Last summer, we even reached a period in which there were no COVID-positive patients at Reid Health.

But that situation quickly changed as first the Delta and then the Omicron variant appeared and rose to prominence, sending cases soaring once again and creating an emergency for hospitals around the region. Since those waves began in late July, the number of deaths at Reid Health from COVID-19 have nearly doubled, going from 190 to 373.

Vaccination remains the best protection we have against COVID-19. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), it creates a more predictable immune response than "natural immunity" from infection, reduces your likelihood of spreading the virus to those who might be more vulnerable than you, and lessens the chances of new variants emerging and causing more problems.

If you would like to be vaccinated, Reid Health is giving out FREE primary doses and booster shots at Lingle Grand Hall on the lower level of Reid's main campus in Richmond. Hours there are 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays.

You don't have to schedule an appointment or pre-register. Walk-ins are welcome, and there are no long wait times.

For those who would like to make an appointment, Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule a time by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov. You may also call Reid's vaccine clinic directly at (765) 935-8484.

March 3rd's COVID-19 Stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 9
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 8 (88.9%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 0
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 0
  • Tests submitted since last update: 167
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 9 (5.4% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 9

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are FREE. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you need to be tested for COVID-19, Reid offers drive-thru testing at 1200 Chester Blvd. in Richmond and at 2025 Virginia Ave. in Connersville. Appointments are required at both sites. The Richmond location is open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily while the Connersville location runs 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. To schedule an appointment, call Reid's COVID-19 Hotline.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

New Training Course Part of Partnership Between Reid EMS, Volunteer Fire Departments

Posted March 3, 2022

Volunteer firefighters representing departments from around Wayne and Union counties are participating this month in emergency medical responder (EMR) training. The free course is offered by Reid Health EMS as part of a partnership between the fire departments and the health system.

A group of 25 people from the Abington, Economy, Fountain City, Greens Fork, Liberty, Milton, Webster, and Williamsburg volunteer fire departments are taking part in the 70-hour course. Classes are held three days a week, leading to final written and skills exams to earn their EMR certification.

Supplied Photo: Brent Meadows, Emergency Medical Services Educator for Reid Health, teaches the emergency medical responder training course."These people are giving their Tuesday nights from 6 to 10, their Thursday nights from 6 to 10, and most of their Saturdays from 8 to 4 to do this," said Brent Meadows, Emergency Medical Services Educator for Reid Health.

"It's on their own time, scheduled around their work schedule, their family schedule, and everything else. It's amazing to have this level of dedication."

The course is the first offered by Reid Health after recently earning a designation as a state-certified training institution. Reid EMS now can offer classes for training to become an EMR, an emergency medical technician (EMT), and a paramedic.

This first course is being offered free of charge with the Wayne County firefighter's association covering the cost of books for the county's participants and Reid Health Community Benefit paying for the Union County firefighters' books.

"We couldn't do it without (the volunteer firefighters). Each one is an extension of the hospital, an extension of the ambulance crew. It's just all a big team." -- Ryan Williams, Director of EMS, Forensics, and Trauma Services for Reid Health

"These people are all first responders who have full-time jobs and are volunteering their time in their communities and serving others, so it's important that we provide something for them," said Ryan Williams, Director of EMS, Forensics, and Trauma Services for Reid Health. "It's important that they have the education in how to care for patients and then continue to help us once the ambulance crews arrive.

"We couldn't do it without them. Each one is an extension of the hospital, an extension of the ambulance crew. It's just all a big team."

The EMR course consists of lectures and hands-on skills and equipment training. Participants also will spend at least four hours riding along in an ambulance.

EMT, paramedic training to come

Although this class is held on the main Reid Health campus in Richmond, future EMT and paramedic courses will take place at the new training center set up at Reid's Connersville campus.

That includes an EMT course set to begin in April and run through the second week of July. Some 170 hours of training will be offered, with graduates earning a certificate that will allow them to work as an EMT in any state.

"Job placement won't likely be a problem for those folks. EMTs are in high demand," he said.

Cost for the course will be $1,000, which includes books. Anyone interested in signing up should contact Meadows at robert.meadows@reidhealth.org. Class size will be limited to 25 people. For more information, email Meadows or call him at (765) 983-8049.

Here's What You Should Know About the CDC's Revised Masking Guidelines

Posted March 3, 2022

With the wave of COVID-19 cases brought on by the Omicron variant receding, federal health officials have rolled out a new tool for communities to determine when and where masks should be worn based on how much the virus is spreading.

The website for the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) now includes updated COVID-19 Community Levels, a county-by-county look at the local risk for COVID-19 and what preventative measures should be taken in those areas.

Here are a few things you should know about this change in CDC guidance.

Why is this being done now?

The CDC says the updated recommendations are the result of current high levels of immunity from both vaccination and infections, which makes the risk for severe disease such as hospitalization and death much lower, at least for now.

What are the COVID-19 Community Levels?

There are three - low, medium, or high - which are determined by looking at a given area's number of hospital beds being used, hospital admissions, and the total number of new cases. You can see your county's current level on the CDC website.

What are the new masking recommendations?

According to the guidelines, the prevention methods you should use depend on your county's level.

  • If it's low, should stay up to date with your COVID-19 vaccines and boosters and get tested if you have symptoms.
  • Follow CDC recommendations for isolation and quarantine if you've been exposed or start feeling ill.
  • If it's medium, those who are at high risk for severe illness should talk with their healthcare provider about whether they should wear a mask and take other precautions. Everyone else should stay up to date on their shots and get tested if they have symptoms. Follow CDC recommendations for isolation and quarantine if you've been exposed or start feeling ill.
  • If it's high, everyone should wear a mask indoors when out in public regardless of their vaccination status, stay up to date on their vaccinations and boosters, and get tested if they have symptoms. Follow CDC recommendations for isolation and quarantine if you've been exposed or start feeling ill.

Regardless of your county's level, if you have symptoms, received a positive test, or have been exposed to someone with COVID-19, you should wear a mask.

The revised guidelines don't prevent you from wearing a mask if you believe it's in the best interest of yourself, your loved ones, or anyone else. You may choose to do so at any time.

Federal health guidelines continue to require surgical masks in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. If you don't have a surgical mask when you arrive, Reid staff will provide you with one.

Vaccination remains the best tool we have in the fight against COVID-19. If you would like to be vaccinated, Reid Health is giving out FREE primary doses and booster shots at Lingle Grand Hall on the lower level of Reid's main campus in Richmond. Hours there are 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays.

You don't have to schedule an appointment or pre-register. Walk-ins are welcome, and there are no long wait times.

For those who would like to make an appointment, Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule a time by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov. You may also call Reid's vaccine clinic directly at (765) 935-8484.

March 1st's COVID-19 Stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 11
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 7 (63.6%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 0
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 0
  • Tests submitted since last update: 212
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 10 (4.7% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 10

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are FREE. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you need to be tested for COVID-19, Reid offers drive-thru testing at 1200 Chester Blvd. in Richmond and at 2025 Virginia Ave. in Connersville. Appointments are required at both sites. The Richmond location is open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily while the Connersville location runs 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. To schedule an appointment, call Reid's COVID-19 Hotline.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Singles Interaction, Inc.

Posted March 17, 2022

Supplied Flyer: March 2022 Singles Interaction Newsletter

If you are 21 years of age or better and single, divorced, widow or widower, Singles' Interaction invites you to join them on Friday nights. Come to the Eagles Lodge, 75 South 12th Street, Richmond (membership not required) and meet other single people in the Richmond area.

IU East Welcomes Return of IU Soul Revue

Posted March 14, 2022

Supplied Photo:  IU Soul Revue performs at the IU East Student Events Center on March 10.
IU Soul Revue performs at the IU East Student Events Center on March 10. It was the first live performance since the pandemic, and the second visit to the Richmond campus for the ensemble. Additional photos and videos from behind the scenes can be found on social media for IU East at @iueast and for the African American Arts Institute @iuaaai.
Supplied Photo:  James A. Strong Jr., director of IU Soul Revue, addresses the crowd at IU East. Strong is an IU East and Soul Revue alumnus.
James A. Strong Jr., director of IU Soul Revue, addresses the crowd at IU East. Strong is an IU East and Soul Revue alumnus.
Supplied Photo:  The audience at IU Soul Revue watches the performance from Lingle Court of the Student Events Center.
The audience at IU Soul Revue watches the performance from Lingle Court of the Student Events Center.
In its first live performance since the COVID-19 pandemic, IU Soul Revue made its return to Indiana University East at Lingle Court at the Student Events Center on March 10.

Throughout this year, IU Soul Revue is celebrating its 50th anniversary with a nod to Al Green's "Let's Stay Together." IU Soul Revue is the nation's first and only university credit-bearing Black popular music ensemble since 1971.

Directed by IU East and Soul Revue alumnus James A. Strong, Jr., the ensemble kicked off its high-energy performance at IU East with the well-known classic, before bringing more songs into the set from artists such as Stevie Wonder, Ashanti, Chris Brown, and Earth, Wind & Fire. Strong received his B.S. in Business Administration from IU East in 2013. He is an Indianapolis native, a renowned bassist, musical director, and producer.

The ensemble is celebrating its golden anniversary with a "series of exciting virtual and live events and activities designed to engage past and present members of our community, to recognize the contributions of those who continue the Soul Revue legacy, and to tell this incredible story."

The performance at IU East brought a crowd of over 250 attendees. During early ticket sales, the campus was still under COVID-19 restrictions on crowd attendance and seating available, which were recently lifted March 4 along with mask guidelines across the state and IU.

Denise Smith, dean of the IU East School of Business and Economics, attended the event.

"The Soul Revue was a great, high-energy show," Smith said. "The members were gifted musicians who engaged the audience throughout the performance. It was a wonderful evening of classic soul music and fun."

The concert was part of IU East's Lively Arts series, presented by First Bank Richmond in partnership with WCTV. For upcoming Lively Arts events and art exhibitions, visit iue.edu/livelyarts.

IU Soul Revue performance March 10 at IU East IU Soul Revue performs at the IU East Student Events Center on March 10. It was the first live performance since the pandemic, and the second visit to the Richmond campus for the ensemble. Additional photos and videos from behind the scenes can be found on social media for IU East at @iueast and for the African American Arts Institute @iuaaai. Print-Quality Photo James A. Strong Jr., director of IU Soul Revue James A. Strong Jr., director of IU Soul Revue, addresses the crowd at IU East. Strong is an IU East and Soul Revue alumnus. Print-Quality Photo Audience members at IU Soul Revue The audience at IU Soul Revue watches the performance from Lingle Court of the Student Events Center. Print-Quality Photo
About IU Soul Revue
This year marks the Soul Revue's 50th anniversary and culminates in a weekend celebration and concert at the historic Madam Walker Legacy Center in Indianapolis, April 22-23. Tickets are available online.

IU Soul Revue is one of three performance ensembles managed by the African American Arts Institute that are offered as courses for academic credit through the Department of African American and African Diaspora Studies at Indiana University Bloomington.

IU Soul Revue is famous for dynamic performances of R&B, soul, funk, and contemporary Black popular music delivered by its commanding vocalists, powerful horn line, and tight rhythm section.

Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County Name Carly Phillips as 2022 Youth of the Year

Posted March 14, 2022

Supplied Photo:  BGCWC Board Member Monica koechlein, Carly Phillips, and BGCWC CO Alicia PainterThe Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County named Carly Phillips as their 2022 Youth of the Year. Phillips is a sophomore at Richmond High School and has been a member of BGCWC for 4 years.

"The Club has become a second family to me," Phillips said of her experience as a Club member. "The staff at the Club have always made me feel wanted, needed, and valued."

Phillips hopes be a representative for all youth and inspire others as Youth of the Year. She intends to use her platform to shine a light on bullying and the effect of drug use on families.

"My generation will be the generation to change America," Phillips asserted.

Supplied Photo:  BGCWC 2022 Youth of the YearIn addition to the award, Phillips received a $1,000 scholarship and advances to compete for Indiana State Youth of the Year.

"Carly's ability to keep her heart engaged in her pursuits and the care she authentically displays for others around her is a true testament to her character," Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County Education Coordinator Samantha Reed said of Phillips. "She will serve as an exemplary ambassador for Boys & Girls Clubs youth, as she does every day within our Clubs and community. She will be a strong voice to help advocate for and represent the nation's young people."

"Carly has always demonstrated ambition, maturity, and responsibility," Richmond High School Teacher Dolka De Motte wrote when recommending Phillips for Youth of the Year. "She is genuinely interested in developing her skills and challenging her abilities as well as being a great role model for her peers."

Supplied Photo:  BGCWC 2022 Youth of the Year, Carly PhillipsBeing named Youth of the Year is the highest honor a Boys & Girls Club Member can receive. It is the Boys & Girls Club's signature effort to foster a new generation of leaders, fully prepared to live and lead in a diverse, global, and integrated world economy.

Phillips was selected from a group of six competitors by a panel of judges after a rigorous review process. Competition consisted of an application with a personal essay and résumé, a panel interview, and a speech.

"The Youth of the Year competition solidifies our confidence in the immeasurable impact the Boys & Girls Clubs have on the lives of the youth of Wayne County," Board Member and Panel Judge Monica Koechlein noted. "It's such a pleasure to spend time with each candidate."

The mission of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County is to enable all young people, especially those who need us most, to reach their full potential as productive, caring, and responsible citizens. Members of the Club, ages 6-18, have access to dedicated, trained professionals who provide guidance in adopting healthy lifestyles and pursuing educational objectives. Currently, the Club serves over 2,700 youth at five locations: the Jeffers, McDaniel, First Bank, Western Wayne, and Hagerstown units and during the summer at our 168-acre Camp Guy located on the Whitewater River. Since 1957, the Club has been striving to equip young people with the skills they need to succeed in life. For more information, visit www.bgcrichmond.org.

Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County Name Amyia Farris and Wesley Phillips as 2022 Jack Reed Memorial Scholarship Winners

Posted March 14, 2022

Supplied Photo:   The Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County named Richmond High School seniors Amyia Farris and Wesley Phillips as their 2022 Jack Reed Memorial Scholarship winners. Both students will receive $2,000 from the Jack Reed Scholarship and an additional $1,000 from the Ivy Tech Foundation to continue their educations post high school. Farris intends to pursue a career in the medical field and Phillips plans to study engineering.

"Growing up and realizing that I could make an impact on the world was a big factor to me," Farris said. "This scholarship will help me achieve my goal of helping others and making an impact on the world while pursuing my nursing degree."

Phillips also hopes to make the world a better place with the help of an advanced education, stating, "I have concluded that it is everyone's job to help improve and help one another."

The two seniors were selected from a group of six finalists by a panel of judges based on their academic merits and involvement with the Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County. Farris has been a Club member for 9 years and has served in many leadership positions within the Club. Phillips served as Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County's 2020 Youth of the Year and is a current Club staff member.

"This year's applicants blew away our selection committee and made picking winners difficult," Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County Director of Resource Development & Special Events Sarah Roddy reflected. "However, Amyia and Wesley stood out with their drive, resiliency, and grit. Amyia goes to school full time, has a job, and helps keep her household running. She is such a hard worker and has a heart of gold. Wesley first came to us after he was placed in foster care and continues to serve the Club by being a member of staff at our First Bank Unit. Much like Amyia, he wears many hats in his everyday life including student, big brother, employee, and apprentice. These two BGCWC Alum are shining examples of what we hope all of our kids can achieve with our support."

Jack Reed was a Board Member of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County and advocate for youth development. After relocating to northern Indiana, Reed was instrumental in helping to open a new Boys & Girls Club in the Fort Wayne area. His dedication to youth and service to his community was remembered by his family when they created the Jack Reed Memorial Scholarship in his honor.

The mission of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County is "to enable all young people, especially those who need us most, to reach their full potential as productive, caring, and responsible citizens." Members of the Club, ages 6-18, have access to dedicated, trained professionals who provide guidance in adopting healthy lifestyles and pursuing educational objectives. Currently, the Club serves over 2,700 youth at five locations: the Jeffers, McDaniel, First Bank, Western Wayne, and Hagerstown units and during the summer at their 168-acre Camp Guy located on the Whitewater River. Since 1957, the Club has been striving to equip young people with the skills they need to succeed in life. For more information, visit www.bgcrichmond.org.

Wayne County Extension Homemakers' Opportunity Club Collects Donations

Posted March 14, 2022

Supplied Photo: Opportunity Club Members

Members of the Wayne County Extension Homemakers' Opportunity Club collected donations for Animal Welfare League and 2nd Chance Animal Rescue during their March meeting. Shown in the photo from left to right are Marlene Creech (co-president), Lisa Allen, Linda Hopkins (secretary), Edna Cox and Peggy Booker.

For further information about the Club, please call 765-966-4151.

Had COVID-19 Recently? It's Still a Good Idea to Get Vaccinated

Posted March 9, 2022

After back-to-back waves of COVID-19 cases through the fall and winter, many have been infected with the virus recently. If you are one of those people and you haven't been vaccinated yet, it's still a good idea to get your shots.

Although infection provides some level of immunity -- often called "natural immunity" -- it remains unclear how long that protection will last.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the level of immunity received from having COVID-19 can vary depending on how mild or severe the illness was, the time since infection, your age, and any underlying health conditions. There's no way to reliably determine if a person is currently protected from re-infection.

The vaccines create a more predictable immune response than infection, providing a high level of protection against severe illness.

There's evidence that shows getting a vaccine after you recover from COVID-19 boosts your immune system. According to one study, those who don't get vaccinated after their recovery from the virus are two times more likely to get the virus again when compared to those who were fully vaccinated after their recovery.

Many of those who currently have COVID-19, can get vaccinated as soon as they've recovered enough to end their isolation period. There's no need to wait weeks or even months to get your first shot. Anyone who received a monoclonal antibody infusion as part of their treatment for COVID-19, should wait 90 days before being vaccinated.

If you'd like to get the vaccine, Reid Health is giving out FREE primary doses and booster shots at Lingle Grand Hall on the lower level of Reid's main campus in Richmond. Hours there are 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays.

You don't have to schedule an appointment or pre-register. Walk-ins are welcome, and there are no long wait times.

For those who would like to make an appointment, Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule a time by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov. You may also call Reid's vaccine clinic directly at (765) 935-8484.

March 8th's COVID-19 Stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 14
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 9 (64.3%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 2
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 1 (50%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 0
  • Tests submitted since last update: 210
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 15 (7.1% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 17

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are FREE. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you need to be tested for COVID-19, Reid offers drive-thru testing at 1200 Chester Blvd. in Richmond and at 2025 Virginia Ave. in Connersville. Appointments are required at both sites. The Richmond location is open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily while the Connersville location runs 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. To schedule an appointment, call Reid's COVID-19 Hotline.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Celebrating 50 Years of Senior Nutrition Programs

Posted March 7, 2022

LifeStream Services is joining the Administration of Community Living (ACL) in celebrating the 50 year anniversary of the addition of senior nutrition programs to the Older Americans Act. This important action allowed for the creation of congregate meal sites and home-delivered meal programs throughout the United States.

Senior Nutrition Programs like LifeStream's have been able to provide nutritious meals for generations of seniors who otherwise might have gone hungry. LifeStream Services coordinates 23 congregate meal sites and provides home-delivered meals to thousands of older adults and people with disabilities in Blackford, Delaware, Fayette, Franklin, Grant, Henry, Jay, Madison, Randolph, Rush, Union and Wayne counties. LifeStream's nutrition program provided over 300,000 meals between July 1, 2020 and June 30, 2021.

LifeStream is visiting its congregate meal sites and distributing goodies throughout the month of March to celebrate. Follow LifeStream on Facebook and Instagram for more information on the nutrition program, nutrition tips, and fun recipes to try at home. Learn more about the 50 year anniversary and LifeStream's nutrition program at lifestreaminc.org/nutrition-month or by calling 800-589-1121.

Community Benefit Gives $46,550 as Part of Programming Partnership with Richmond Parks Department

Posted March 7, 2022

Supplied Photo: Angela Cline, Director of Reid Health Community Benefit (second from left), presents a check to Richmond Parks Superintendent Denise Retz (left), Community Recreation Coordinator Keith Clemens (second from right), and Farmers Market CoordinatorAs part of its mission to improve the health of the community, Reid Health Community Benefit has contributed more than $46,000 to the Richmond Parks and Recreation Department to help fund a variety of programs this year.

A total of $46,550 will be split between the Richmond Farmers Market, the Industrial Softball League, Just Us Kids Outdoors (JUKO), Get Healthy in the Parks, classes at the Richmond Senior Recreation Center, and the Family Series of events.

"Partnering with Richmond Parks and Recreation just makes good sense for Reid Health Community Benefit," said Angela Cline, Director of Community Benefit. "With funding for programming, they're able to help us provide opportunities for physical activity for adults and kids. We're also able to increase access to fresh, local produce, which impacts nutrition and overall health.

"Through this partnership, we will also be able to support family events and activities that provide an opportunity for adults and kids to spend quality time together and really connect, which strengthens families, and in turn, improves the health of our communities."

The bulk of the funding -- $30,000 -- will go toward the Double Dollars Program for the Richmond Farmers Market, which allows those who receive federal SNAP benefits to double their purchasing power at the weekly markets.

"Partnering with Reid in our Double Dollars Program has been essential for the growth of the market for both our vendors and the market-goers," said Denise Retz, Parks Superintendent. "When shoppers spend their SNAP dollars at the market, it not only benefits the local farmer, it benefits the local economy.

"Reid plays a part in this by doubling what shoppers can spend while providing an opportunity for local food access and nutritional security."

"Partnering with Richmond Parks and Recreation just makes good sense for Reid Health Community Benefit. With funding for programming, they're able to help us provide opportunities for physical activity for adults and kids. We're also able to increase access to fresh, local produce, which impacts nutrition and overall health." -- Angela Cline, Director of Reid Health Community Benefit

Other programs receiving funding through the partnership include:

  • Industrial Softball League: $5,000 to cover association fees; umpire fees; maintenance; administrative staff fees for organization, registration, and scheduling; and more.
  • JUKO: $5,000 for the full-day, organized summer camp experience for kids.
  • Get Healthy in the Parks: $4,500 to be split between the Walking Club, fitness classes in the parks, City Bike Park events, and eight organized rides called the Richmond Rose Pedal events.
  • Family Series: $1,500 for the Father-Daughter Walk, Mother-Son Walk, Back to School Splash Bash, and Middlefork Family Day.
  • Senior Recreation Center: $550 for cooking and Gentle Yoga classes.

"Our partnership with Reid Community Benefit allows us the opportunity to do more and serve more," Retz said. "Our goal is to provide high-quality programming at low or no cost to our community. Without Reid's support, we could not make that happen.

"Reid understands recreation is essential in the development and physical health of our community, and they understand how hard the park team works to provide that for all ages and all abilities."

In addition to grants, Reid Health Community Benefit supports various programs focused on community health, specifically in the areas of mental health and substance misuse, nutrition, physical activity and weight, and Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACES). To learn more about Reid's commitment to our communities, and the initiatives of Community Benefit, please review the Community Health Needs Assessment and Implementation Plans at reidcommunities.org or reidhealth.org.

Neurology, Pediatric & Internal Medicine Named First RHPA Practices of the Year

Posted March 14, 2022

In a first-of-its-kind celebration for Reid Health on Friday, Reid Neurology Associates and Reid Pediatric & Internal Medicine were honored as the Reid Health Physicians Association (RHPA) Practices of the Year during a dinner at Forest Hills Country Club in Richmond.

The awards are new for the RHPA network, which in its 12 years of existence has grown to include more than 50 primary and specialty care practices with some 260 providers and more than 900 total employees.

"Our teams provide high-quality, patient-centric care," said Rohit Bawa, MD, Chair of the RHPA Network Operations Council. "We felt it was important to recognize their tremendous work by determining both Primary Care and Specialty Care Practices of the Year."

The awards are based on how well practices do in three key areas: quality, patient experience, and financial performance. Since many of the specialty care practices were establishing new quality metrics last year, that category was considered only for the primary care practices this time around.

"The awards were started as a means of providing recognition to the entire team that makes up the practice," said Billie Kester, Vice President for Continuum of Care at Reid Health. "It takes everyone working together to be a top performer, and this is a great way to highlight that and create some healthy competition among the RHPA teams."

Reid Neurology Associates was the top scoring specialty care practice in both patient experience and financial performance, making it the overall winner for specialty care.

"All of us at Reid Neurology Associates are delighted and honored to win this inaugural award," said Jordan Raynor, MD. "We are proud to provide a high level of care to patients with neurological disease at Reid. Doing so would be impossible without the collective efforts of our team."

"It is an honor and privilege to work with the Neurology team, a group of amazing people who deliver exceptional care," said Misti Foust-Cofield, Vice President/Chief Nursing Officer for Reid Health. "They set a very high bar for practices in the years to come.

"I am so proud of the teams involved and the selflessness that it takes to hit these goals."

For primary care, Reid Pediatric & Internal Medicine ranked No. 1 overall while Reid Health Primary & Specialty Care - Hagerstown scored the highest for patient experience, Reid Internal Medicine was best in the quality metrics, and Randolph Medical Center along with Family & Occupational Medicine of Lynn combined for the top marks in financial performance.

"This is a huge honor and accomplishment. It speaks to the commitment and dedication of our entire staff at Reid Pediatric & Internal Medicine to patient care and excellence," said Martin Munoz, MD.

"It's humbling to think of it, particularly after everything we have been through both personally and professionally over the past couple of years, and I want to extend my most sincere gratitude to everyone in the workplace. They should be proud of their accomplishments!"

Although there can be only two winners, the high-quality care provided at those practices are reflective of what patients can expect at locations throughout the Reid Health network.

"We are blessed to have such hard-working and dedicated employees throughout our team who continually and diligently focus on the care of their patients," said Craig Kinyon, Reid Health President/CEO. "Each of them embodies our organizational values of excellence, empathy, integrity, and accountability."

"These practices are at the forefront of our mission to lead our communities to well-being, one person at a time," said Tom Hilkert, Chair of the Reid Health Governing Board. "They make Reid Health the high-quality organization that it is today."

Reid Health Makes Forbes List of America's Best Employers for 2022

Posted March 14, 2022

Reid Health is one of the nation's top midsize employers, according to a survey conducted by business news outlet Forbes in a partnership with Statista Inc., the world-leading statistics portal and industry ranking provider.

Reid was selected as one of America's Best Employers for 2022. A total of 1,000 organizations made the list, divided across two categories: large and midsize.

Some 60,000 people working for companies with more than 1,000 employees were surveyed anonymously to compile the list. Participants were asked to rate, on a scale of 0-10, how likely they would be to recommend their employer. They also were asked to rate their companies on factors such as working conditions, development opportunities, and compensation.

"It's a wonderful honor to be included on this list of top employers, especially given the method used to compile the rankings," said Craig Kinyon, Reid Health President/CEO. "We could not provide the high-quality care to our communities that we do without the incredible hard work of our dedicated team members.

"This survey is helpful feedback that will continue to guide our objectives in making Reid a great place for our staff to serve our patients and their families."

The final list includes the 500 large (more than 5,000 employees) and 500 midsize (1,000-5,000 employees) organizations that received the most recommendations. Reid employs more than 3,500 team members across its eight-county service region in east-central Indiana and west-central Ohio.

Reid was one of 19 across the country in the Healthcare & Social category to make the midsize list. A total of 10 Indiana companies were on the midsize rankings, with Reid the only Hoosier hospital among those.

"An award like this is a reflection of everything that Reid Health is about," said Carrie Kolentus, Reid's Director of Human Resources. "The culture we've built together is vital to our mission to lead our communities to well-being, one person at a time."

More information about Reid Health's culture, communities served, and employment opportunities can be found at BeReid.com.

Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County Receive $50,000 Donation From Meijer

Posted February 28, 2022

Supplied Photo: Children and staff holding signs.The Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County were one of 24 Boys & Girls Clubs across Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, and Wisconsin chosen to receive a $50,000 donation to invest in educational and developmental programs for local youth.

Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County Chief Executive Officer Alicia Painter remarked, "We could not be more excited about, or grateful for, our local Meijers' and the national retailer's support. This gift represents their faith in the youth of Wayne County and the mission of our Boys & Girls Clubs."

"As a family-owned business, serving families, and especially children, in our communities is always important to us," Meijer President & CEO Rick Keyes said in a release. "Boys & Girls Clubs offer safe places for children and teens to grow into the future leaders our communities will need, and we're pleased to support them through this donation."

The retailer's gift will fund development programs focused on health, academics, and leadership for Boys & Girls Club members.

"We know that each of our communities are different and that each of the Clubs understand the wants and needs of their members best," said Cathy Cooper, Senior Director of Community Partnerships and Giving at Meijer in a release. "We look forward to seeing how they find unique ways to use this gift to help their members learn, lead and grow."

The mission of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County is to enable all young people, especially those who need us most, to reach their full potential as productive, caring, and responsible citizens. Members of the Club, ages 6-18, have access to dedicated, trained professionals who provide guidance in adopting healthy lifestyles and pursuing educational objectives. Currently, the Club serves over 2,700 youth at five locations: the Jeffers, McDaniel, First Bank, Western Wayne, and Hagerstown units and during the summer at our 168-acre Camp Guy located on the Whitewater River. Since 1957, the Club has been striving to equip young people with the skills they need to succeed in life. For more information, visit www.bgcrichmond.org.

CDC: Some Getting Pfizer, Moderna Vaccines Might Want to Wait 8 Weeks Between First 2 Doses

Posted February 28, 2022

Since the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines against COVID-19 first were approved, the recommended time to wait between doses of the two-shot vaccines has remained the same: three weeks for Pfizer and four weeks for Moderna.

That's still the case for people who are moderately to severely immunocompromised, adults ages 65 and older, and anyone else who needs rapid protection from the virus because of increased spread in their community or who has a high risk for severe illness from COVID-19.

But for some people ages 12 and older -- in particular males ages 12-39 -- the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now says you might consider waiting up to eight weeks before getting that second shot.

Both the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines are safe and effective. They have the typical side effects that can include arm soreness or redness, headache, muscle pain, tiredness, and chills that usually go away within a few days.

There have been rare cases of heart inflammation called myocarditis and pericarditis in children and young adults who have received the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines, but according to the American Academy of Pediatrics, the risk for inflammation is much higher from COVID-19 infection than from the vaccine.

For the few who have experienced myocarditis or pericarditis after vaccination, most of those who received care responded well to medicine and rest and felt better quickly, according to the CDC.

Now, some studies of those ages 12 and older have shown the already-small risk of heart inflammation can be reduced by extending the time between first and second doses. Those same studies suggest the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines actually might be most effective for many people with eight weeks between shots.

For that reason, the CDC this week updated its guidelines to say those who still need their initial vaccinations and aren't at high risk for severe illness from the virus might consider waiting eight weeks between their first and second doses of Pfizer or Moderna.

The change stops short of recommending certain groups wait the extra time between shots, and it does not affect any federal vaccination mandates already in place.

If you would like to be vaccinated for COVID-19, Reid Health is giving out FREE primary doses and booster shots at Lingle Grand Hall on the lower level of Reid's main campus in Richmond. Hours there are 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays.

You don't have to schedule an appointment or pre-register. Walk-ins are welcome, and there are no long wait times.

For those who would like to make an appointment, Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule a time by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov. You may also call Reid's vaccine clinic directly at (765) 935-8484.

February 24th's COVID-19 Stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 11
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 7 (63.6%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 1
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 1 (100%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 0
  • Tests submitted since last update: 197
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 14 (7.1% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 13

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are FREE. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you need to be tested for COVID-19, Reid offers drive-thru testing at 1200 Chester Blvd. in Richmond and at 2025 Virginia Ave. in Connersville. Appointments are required at both sites. The Richmond location is open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily while the Connersville location runs 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. To schedule an appointment, call Reid's COVID-19 Hotline.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

RSO Prepares for the Remainder of the 2022-2023 Season

Posted February 23, 2022

Richmond Symphony Orchestra will welcome back Mark Kosmala, former principal cellist of the RSO from season 2019-2020. Kosmala was scheduled to solo with the orchestra in March 2021, but with the cancellation of live performances last season, he will return to solo one year after the original date.

Kosmala will return to the RSO stage on March 5 at 7:30 pm for a performance of Bruch's Ave Maria. Other offerings on the program include Glinka's Overture to Ruslan and Lumilla, Bizet's Suite No. 1 from Carmen, Bilik's American Civic War Fantasy - full of familiar American folk songs, Mussorgsky's Night on Bald Mountain - heard in Disney's Fantasia, and Brahms' great Academic Festival Overture.

Tickets available for purchase HERE

Retirement of Guy Bordo

Following the January 29 concert, Maestro Guy Victor Bordo announced his early retirement to the RSO Board of Directors. Bordo shared sentiments with the RSO Board to pass on to the audience. "I want to thank the community for your great support and enthusiastic attendance at concerts. I greatly appreciate the musicians, donors, staff and Board of Directors."

The RSO thanks Maestro Bordo for his 25 years of service and his many contributions to the quality and growth of the RSO during that time and wishes Maestro Bordo and his wife Deb all the best in the future. Bordo continued, "My wife Deb and I will miss the many wonderful friends we have in Richmond. It has been a pleasure to be associated with the RSO."

Closing out the RSO's 65th season, the orchestra will be led by Guest Conductor Maestro Wilbur Lin on March 5 and April 9, as well as our Signature Event "Show Me The '90s" on April 30. READ LIN'S BIO

Looking to the Future

Turning its attention to an exciting year of transition, the RSO Board of Directors is pleased to announce audiences will witness seven different conductors for its seven-concert season. The RSO invites everyone to mark their calendars for 2022-2023 season.

  • September 17, 2022
  • October 15, 2022
  • November 19, 2022
  • December 11, 2022
  • January 28, 2023
  • February 25, 2023
  • March 25, 2023

Tickets for the 2022-2023 season will be on sale beginning May 1, 2022.

Meet the Five Finalists

In its 65th season, the Richmond Symphony Orchestra has had only three music directors, but the 2022-2023 season will see five candidates audition to serve as its next leader.

After a six month process, an 11-member Search Team led by Board member Jeff Jackson has identified five candidates they believe can successfully step into the role as the RSO's fourth Music Director & Conductor.

Each of the finalists will conduct one of the RSO's Masterworks concerts during the 2022-2023 season, titled A New Perspective. After each concert, the audience will be invited to submit comments through online or written surveys. These comments, along with feedback from musicians and RSO leadership, will help determine the future leader of the orchestra.

READ MORE ABOUT THE FINALISTS

Stay in Touch

Visit RichmondSymphony.org or call (765)966-5181. Follow the RSO on Facebook at /RichmondSymphonyOrchestra or email the office at RSO@RichmondSymphony.org and request to be added to the mailing and electronic lists to be the first to receive RSO news.

Student Now Second Gilman Scholarship Winner from IU East

Posted February 23, 2022

An Indiana University East psychology major expects to expand her educational foundation in psychology and neuroscience when she heads to Europe in May as the second from the campus to receive a national Gilman Scholarship, a program of the United States Department of State.

Supplied Photo:  Shelly Smith
Shelly Smith of Raleigh, North Carolina, is IU East's second student to receive a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship. The online psychology major will travel abroad to Europe beginning this May.

Shelly Smith expects to graduate in 2024 and continue working on her doctorate. Smith, who grew up just outside of Williamsburg and Fountain City, now lives in Raleigh, North Carolina.

"This is a great trip for me, especially with my hope to continue on into research and neuroscience," Smith said.

The trip abroad is planned for May 18 to June 4, and will include London, Vienna and Leipzig, Germany. Sites she and other students on the trip will visit include Charles Darwin's home, Bethlem Royal Hospital, and Sigmund Freud's home, among other relevant historic sites.

Alex Hakes, a resident of Richmond, was IU East's first recipient of the of the Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship. Hakes, a double-major with degrees in Political Science and Spanish, received a 2021 Gilman scholarship to travel to Costa Rica in July 2021.

Deborah Miller, assistant professor of psychology, organizes the trip, which will include eight students altogether.

"I have organized this trip twice before. We study the history of psychology in Europe," she said. "Students take an online course with me during the spring semester to learn about this history, then the culmination is the two-week trip to these important sites to learn about important early leaders in the field."

Miller structures the trip for education and for fun, she said. "Group activities are psychology-based with some fun things thrown in, like a group trip to a West End musical in London. We also have at least one big group dinner in each city so that we have plenty of time to reflect on what the students are experiencing during the trip."

She has several goals for students. "The most obvious one is to deepen their understanding of the roots of psychological science. But beyond that, students are developing so many other real-world skills like adapting to stress, learning how to function in a group, communication skills, responsibility, independence, developing a global mindset. One of my greatest hopes for students is that this trip ignites a passion for travel and gives them the self-efficacy they need to become independent travelers in the future."

The students will have time to explore on their own in addition to structured activities. The Gilman Foundation's purpose is to encourage study abroad and discover the significant impact it can have on students and their career paths. "I'm humbled to be chosen and hope to do the Foundation proud during my journey there and with my career thereafter," Smith said.

Students in any study area can apply for the scholarship, which requires the student be a Pell grant recipient or a child dependent of an active duty military member. The scholarship provides awards up to $5,000 for study or intern abroad on credit-bearing programs.The next deadline is coming up soon on March 1, 2022. IU East students interested in applying for a Gilman Scholarship are encouraged to read the online flyer.

What's the Difference Between Being Fully Vaccinated for COVID-19 vs. Up to Date?

Posted February 23, 2022

Since booster shots for the COVID-19 vaccines were first approved by federal health officials, there's been some confusion about what it means to be fully vaccinated.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) uses two terms when discussing vaccination: "fully vaccinated" and "up to date." Which one applies to you depends on how many vaccine doses you've received so far.

Fully vaccinated

According to the CDC, you are fully vaccinated once two weeks have passed since you finished your primary series of COVID-19 vaccines. That means two shots of either Pfizer or Moderna or one of Johnson & Johnson.

Immunocompromised people need to add a dose to their primary series, making them fully vaccinated if they've had three shots of Pfizer or Moderna or one of Johnson & Johnson plus one of either Pfizer or Moderna.

Up to date

Being up to date with your COVID-19 vaccines means you've received all the doses recommended by the CDC. That includes the primary series of whatever vaccine you initially chose as well as a booster shot.

Boosters should be received at least five months after completing your primary series of shots for those who had Pfizer or Moderna. Johnson & Johnson recipients should get a booster at least two months after their primary dose.

At this point, one booster is all you need. Federal health officials have not yet authorized a second booster shot.

If you would like to be vaccinated for COVID-19, Reid Health is giving out FREE primary doses and boosters at Lingle Grand Hall on the lower level of Reid's main campus in Richmond. Hours there are 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays.

You don't have to schedule an appointment or pre-register. Walk-ins are welcome, and there are no long wait times.

For those who would like to make an appointment, Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule a time by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov. You may also call Reid's vaccine clinic directly at (765) 935-8484.

February 22nd's COVID-19 Stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 15
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 10 (66.7%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 1
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 1 (100%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 0
  • Tests submitted since last update: 135
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 11 (8.1% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 12

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are FREE. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you need to be tested for COVID-19, Reid offers drive-thru testing at 1200 Chester Blvd. in Richmond and at 2025 Virginia Ave. in Connersville. Appointments are required at both sites. The Richmond location is open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily while the Connersville location runs 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. To schedule an appointment, call Reid's COVID-19 Hotline.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

RAM Benefit Auction Is Live with Walther & Hawkins

Posted February 23, 2022

Logo:  Richmond Art Museum (RAM)Online bidding ONLY! You must register to bid. Auction ends March 1 at 7PM. Soft close with an item closing every minute.

The proceeds from this auction will benefit the Richmond Art Museum's Conservation and Acquisition Fund. RAM is celebrating its 124th Anniversary and brings art to the greater Wayne County area serving nearly 7,000 students annually.

Paintings, Ceramics, Photographs, & More!

Click Here to View Auction

Date Change: IU East Legislative Forum Moves to Feb. 25

Posted February 21, 2022

Supplied Photos: Mengle Parker, Brad Barrett, and Jeff RaatzIndiana University East is moving its virtual Legislative Forum to 8 a.m. on Friday, February 25.

The forum is free and open to the public to watch on WGTV Channel 11 (Comcast Cable) and IU East Facebook Live at http//www.iue.edu/facebook.

Senator Jeff Raatz and Representative Brad Barrett will talk with the community about the 2022 Indiana General Assembly and any legislation of interest live from the Whitewater Community Television (WCTV) studio.

After the discussion, the forum will then open for a question-and-answer period with the virtual audience.

Community members may submit questions for response through the comments section on IU East Facebook Live during the live broadcast.

Mengie Parker, director of Institutional Effectiveness Institutional Reporting and associate professor of criminal justice, will moderate the Legislative Forum.


The Legislative Forum will be available to view later through Video on Demand at https://wgtv.viebit.com.

DNR Recreation and Fishing Guidebooks Are Online

Posted February 21, 2022

Supplied Photo: DNR Fishing & Recreation GuidesYour guide to Indiana's best values in outdoor recreation is available now at on.IN.gov/recguide.Guides

And your guide to Indiana fishing is available at on.IN.gov/fishingguide.

The DNR's 2022 Indiana Recreation Guide is the source for information on state parks, state forests, lakes, fish & wildlife areas, nature preserves, state park inns, and other DNR properties.

Soon, free printed copies of each will be available at local retail outlets, state parks, lakes and other DNR properties.

Paper copies of the guides also are available at the DNR booth in Tackle Town, in the Blue Ribbon Pavilion at the Indianapolis Boat, Sport and Travel Show, today through Feb. 20 and 23-27, at the Indiana State Fairgrounds in Indianapolis.

Annual entrance passes for state park properties can be purchased in person at the gatehouse or offices of state park properties during business hours, at the Indiana Government Center South in Indianapolis during business hours or at shopINstateparks.com.

Indiana resident passes cost $50. For individuals 65 years old or older, the price is $25. Annual passes for vehicles with out-of-state license plates are $70. Normal daily gate fees for residents at most properties are $7 per in-state vehicle. For more information on Indiana state park properties, visit stateparks.IN.gov.

Fishing licenses can be purchased and printed at INHuntFish.com. They can also be purchased at retailers, county clerk offices, most DNR properties throughout the state, as well as at the Boat, Sport and Travel Show.

To view all DNR news releases, please see dnr.IN.gov.

RSO Identifies 5 Finalists for Music Director Position

Posted February 21, 2022

In its 65th season, the Richmond Symphony Orchestra (RSO) has had only three music directors, but the 2022-2023 season will see five candidates audition to serve as its next leader.

Last June, Maestro Guy Victor Bordo announced that the 2021-2022 season, his 25th, would be his final at the helm of the orchestra. After a six month process, an 11-member Search Team led by Board member Jeff Jackson has identified five candidates they believe can successfully step into the role as the RSO's fourth Music Director & Conductor.

Each of the finalists will conduct one of the RSO's Masterworks concerts during the 2022-2023 season, titled A New Perspective. After each concert, the audience will be invited to submit comments through online or written surveys. These comments, along with feedback from musicians and RSO leadership, will help determine the future leader of the orchestra.

"For our audience, this is a unique opportunity to participate in the selection of the RSO's next conductor as we continue to build Richmond's important musical heritage." said Jeff Jackson, RSO board member and leader of the search committee. "We feel that each of our five finalists demonstrates the highest level of artistry, vision, versatility and innovation. Equally important, each has experience in growing audiences and educational outreach. We are very excited to share their talents with the community and have our audiences join us in the selection process."

The RSO Board of DIrectors is pleased to announce the following five finalists for the Richmond Symphony Orchestra's Music Director & Conductor position:

LUKE FRAZIER

Luke Frazier will join the RSO in its opening concert of the upcoming season on September 17, 2022.

Luke Frazier believes the future of orchestral music is breaking down barriers between orchestras and audiences. He believes the role of a conductor is not only musical excellence, but also creating diverse and engaging programming that brings communities together through the joy of music.

Frazier is conductor of the American Pops Orchestra (APO) which he founded in 2015 with the purpose of presenting a broad array of popular and classical music in innovative ways to bring new audiences into the orchestral world. Most recently APO was featured in more than twelve national broadcasts on PBS. Luke maintains a busy schedule as a guest conductor and pianist. He serves as inaugural Principal Pops Conductor for The National Philharmonic featuring performances in venues from Lincoln Center to the Smithsonian, Feinstein's/54 Below to The Kravis Center and many more.

JACOB JOYCE

Jacob Joyce will lead the RSO in its second Masterworks concert on October 15, 2022.

Jacob Joyce brings tireless passion for music-making and a love for outreach to his work. Joyce strives to maintain and develop the orchestra's vital musical and social presence both on the stage and in the community.

Joyce serves as Resident Conductor of the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra which he led in a variety of concerts in the past three seasons. Quickly gaining recognition as a dynamic and innovative presence on the podium, Joyce has made several guest appearances nationally and internationally and was recently named Associate Conductor of the Pittsburgh Symphony. Joyce is also an accomplished violinist.

An advocate for bringing classical music to new audiences, Jacob is the host and creator of the podcast Attention to Detail: The Classical Music Listening Guide, which provides people of all backgrounds with basic techniques for listening to classical music.

WESLEY SCHULZ

Wesley Schulz will make his debut on the Civic Hall stage on November 19, 2022.

Wesley Schulz is widely recognized for his superb programming and spirited yet heartfelt music making with orchestras. At the core of his artistry is the desire to unite people through thought-provoking performances.

Schulz is Music Director and Conductor of the Auburn Symphony Orchestra (WA) and recently completed four successful seasons as Associate Conductor of the North Carolina Symphony where he conducted over 200 performances in a wide variety of genres, including his passion - educational programming. He is committed to deepening the relationship between the symphony and the community. Recent endeavors include collaborations in the arts community, multiple commissioning projects, and diverse concert presentations at local parks, breweries and community spaces.

As a community builder, Wes frequently brings together artists, philanthropists, business entities, and political leaders in support of the Arts.

MATTHEW KRAEMER

Matthew Kraemer will take to the RSO stage on January 28, 2023.

Matthew Kraemer is recognized for his musical sensitivity and energized sense of interpretation. He is committed to audience development and building community support for the symphonies he leads.

A Richmond native, Kraemer was appointed Music Director and Conductor of the Indianapolis Chamber Orchestra in 2015. Additionally, he serves as Music Director of the Butler County Symphony (PA), the Marion Philharmonic, and is the Artistic Advisor of the Muncie Symphony Orchestra. He also maintains an active guest conducting schedule. Kraemer is increasingly recognized for his committed advocacy of music education and his devotion to young audiences.

Matthew believes an orchestra's true strength is determined by its relevance within the community. This belief assists him in creating programming that offers something for everyone, from a first-time concert goer or a longtime season ticket holder.

ANDRÉS LOPERA

Andrés Lopera will join the orchestra as our fifth and final candidate on February 25, 2023.

Exciting, creative, engaging and motivating are some of the words that have been used to describe Andrés Lopera. One of the leading Latin-American conductors in the US today, the 34-year old Colombian native brings more than 10 years of leadership experience with both professional orchestras and youth orchestras to his role.

Lopera is in his 3rd season as Associate Conductor of the Columbus Symphony (OH) and Music Director of the Columbus Youth Symphony Orchestra. During his time in Columbus, he has transformed educational programming and the community presence of the orchestra. This presence included a new community concert series with performances in parks around the city.

Andrés is a passionate conductor who believes in the transformational power of music with a goal of making meaningful connections for both musicians and the community with the orchestra.

Additional Performances

Two additional concerts are being planned in the transitional season. The RSO Brass will take center stage led by principal horn Darin Sorley on December 11, 2022 with a holiday concert made possible by a very generous gift from the West End Bank Charitable Foundation. This gift, given to eight Wayne County organizations in April of 2021, ensures a brass concert becomes a permanent fixture in the RSO's annual programming.

The 2022-2023 season will conclude during the March 25-26, 2023 weekend with a return to the stage of Richmond native and guest conductor Jack Everly. Everly is the Principal Pops Conductor of the Indianapolis and Baltimore Symphony Orchestras, Naples Philharmonic Orchestra and National Arts Centre Orchestra (Ottawa).

Celebrating his 11th anniversary as Music Director of the National Memorial Day Concert and A Capitol Fourth on PBS, Maestro Everly proudly leads the National Symphony Orchestra in these patriotic celebrations on the West Lawn of the US Capitol. These concerts attract hundreds of thousands of attendees to the lawn and the broadcasts reach millions of viewers and are some of the highest rated programming on PBS.

Plans for Everly's visit and performance are yet to be determined.

Tickets

Tickets for the upcoming season will be on sale beginning May 1, 2022. "We'd love to have full audiences next season to provide a warm welcome to our finalists," says Jackson. "Please plan to join us to share your input and be a part of shaping the RSO's future."

Visit RichmondSymphony.org or call (765)966-5181. Follow the RSO on Facebook at /RichmondSymphonyOrchestra or email the office at RSO@RichmondSymphony.org and request to be added to the mailing and electronic lists to be the first to receive RSO news.

Change Made to timing of COVID-19 Booster Shot for Immunocompromised People

Posted February 21, 2022

Most of those who have a weakened immune system should receive their COVID-19 vaccination booster shot three months after their primary series of doses, according to updated information from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Previous guidance from the CDC had the timing of booster shots for moderately to severely immunocompromised people at five months after the primary series for those who initially received either the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines.

The total number of vaccinations and the timing for those shots depends on how old the immunocompromised person is and which vaccine they had for their primary dose or doses.

Children ages 5-11

Only the Pfizer vaccine has been approved for kids ages 5-11. Immunocompromised children within that age range should get three doses initially, with the second coming 21 days after their first and the third 28 days after the second. No booster shot has been approved for this age group so far.

Pre-teens, teens, and adults who received Pfizer

For the immunocompromised ages 12 and older who are getting the Pfizer vaccine, the second dose should come 21 days after the first and the third 28 days after the second. A booster shot should be received three months after the third dose for a total of four vaccinations.

Pre-teens, teens, and adults who received Moderna

The Moderna vaccine has been approved only for those ages 18 and older. Immunocompromised people who get the Moderna product should have their second dose 28 days after the first and the third 28 days after the second. A booster shot should be received three months after the third dose for a total of four vaccinations.

Those 18 and older who received Johnson & Johnson

If an immunocompromised person initially got the one-shot Johnson & Johnson vaccine, they should have a second dose - preferably using either Pfizer or Moderna - 28 days after the initial shot. A booster of Pfizer or Moderna should then be received two months after the second dose for a total of three vaccinations.

If you would like to be vaccinated for COVID-19, Reid Health is giving out FREE primary doses and booster shots at Lingle Grand Hall on the lower level of Reid's main campus in Richmond. Hours there are 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays.

You don't have to schedule an appointment or pre-register. Walk-ins are welcome, and there are no long wait times.

For those who would like to make an appointment, Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule a time by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov. You may also call Reid's vaccine clinic directly at (765) 935-8484.

February 18th's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 28
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 16 (57.1%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 1
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 1 (100%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 0
  • Tests submitted since last update: 152
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 21 (13.8% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 16

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are FREE. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you need to be tested for COVID-19, Reid offers drive-thru testing at 1200 Chester Blvd. in Richmond and at 2025 Virginia Ave. in Connersville. Appointments are required at both sites. The Richmond location is open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily while the Connersville location runs 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. To schedule an appointment, call Reid's COVID-19 Hotline.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

IU East Hosts Virtual Reflection of 59th Anniversary of 16th Street Baptist Church Bombing

Posted February 21, 2022


Indiana University East will host a virtual event, "Sisters in the Struggle: Reflections on the 59th Anniversary of the 16th Street Baptist Church Bombing," at 7 p.m. on Thursday, February 24 via Zoom.

Registration for the virtual event is available at Eventbrite, and the Zoom link will be provided after registration. The event is free and open to the public.

The event is sponsored by IU East, Earlham College and The Reid Center.

Sarah Collins Rudolph and Janie Collins Simpkins will share their experiences about surviving the horrific Birmingham bombing in 1963 that killed their sister, Addie Mae Collins and three others. They will be joined by Tracy Snipe, author of The 5th Little Girl: Soul Survivor of the 16th Street Baptist Church Bombing.

Chief Diversity Officer and Special Assistant to the Chancellor Yemi Mahoney encourages everyone to attend this event.

"I welcome you to join us to listen to Sarah and Janie as they share in the memory of their sister, Addie Mae Collins, and to remember the three additional victims Cynthia Wesley; Carole Robertson; Carol Denise McNair; as we near the 59th anniversary of this horrific event and the tragic loss of these young lives," Mahoney said.

Rudolph was the "Fifth Little Girl" inside the lounge when a bomb detonated at the 16th Street Church. She valiantly tried to rescue her sister Addie, and decades later would receive the Harmony Award from the Congress of Racial Equality for demonstrating bravery. The Birmingham native is married to George C. Rudolph.

From the stages of the Madame Walker Theatre Center in Indianapolis, Indiana, to Philadelphia's Independence Hall, the civil rights icon shares her views on forgiveness, reconciliation, and racial justice.

Simpkins is a member of the More than Conquerors congregation but attended the 16th Street Baptist Church as a youth. She was at church the day her sister Addie and three other youths lost their lives. She appeared on the Oprah Winfrey Show in June 2002 in an episode dealing with this tragedy and the topic of forgiveness.

Simpkins was also featured in Spike Lee's documentary, 4 Little Girls. She was also a panelist at The Gathering: Civil Rights Justice Remembered. Currently, Simpkins is self-employed; this talented seamstress operates under the label CallJanie.

Snipe is an associate professor in the School of Public and International Affairs at Wright State University where he teaches Politics and Film, Black Women and Politics, French Politics and has co-led several civil rights pilgrimages.

He has published in The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science and lectured nationally with Sarah Collins Rudolph, Janie Collins Simpkins, and Junie Collins Williams. He is now writing Saving the Best Wine for Last: Remembrances of the 16th Street Church Bombing, along with Williams.

Indiana Humanities and Morrisson-Reeves Library Present ONE STATE / ONE STORY

Posted February 17, 2022

Supplied Image: One State/ One StoryMorrisson-Reeves Library (MRL) and Cope Environmental Center (CEC) partnered in a project celebrating reading and nature and have been awarded a Community Read grant from Indiana Humanities to participate in a statewide read of Aimee Nezhukumatathil's World of Wonders: In Praise of Fireflies, Whale Sharks, and Other Astonishments. Wayne County and other communities throughout Indiana will be reading the book as part of One State / One Story: World of Wonders.

Between the two organizations, they will host seven community programs tied to the book during 2022, including a book discussion, storytime, nature writing workshop, unearthing lecture, art projects, and a nature hike. They will also receive 30 books and assorted materials like bookmarks and posters to promote the programs.

Nezhukumatathil's collection of short essays explores the wonders of nature which defy easy depiction. She takes us through her past experiences and shares guidance she's received from our world's fierce and funny creatures. The axolotl teaches us to smile, even in the face of unkindness; Photo:  Book Cover Imagethe touch-me-not plant shows us how to shake off unwanted advances; the narwhal demonstrates how to survive in hostile environments. Even in the strange and the unlovely, Nezhukumatathil finds beauty and kinship. For it is this way with wonder: it requires that we are curious enough to look past the distractions in order to fully appreciate the world's gifts. These lessons are further supplemented by beautiful illustrations by Fumi Mini Nakamura throughout the book.

"We are excited to have selected 'World of Wonders' for our third One State / One Story," said Keira Amstutz, president, and CEO of Indiana Humanities. "We think Nezhukumatathil's beautiful and thought-provoking essays will spark conversations among Hoosiers about our natural world and our place in it.

Beth Harrick, MRL's Program Specialist says, "Morrisson-Reeves Library is proud to feature programs examining our relationship to nature. I believe our community will appreciate how World of Wonders explores linkages between our social lives, aspects of identity–like race and gender–and the larger, natural world around us."

One State / One Story: World of Wonders is an initiative designed by Indiana Humanities, in partnership with the Indiana State Library and Indiana Center for the Book, to encourage Hoosiers to read and engage deeply with a book as part of a statewide conversation tied to Indiana Humanities' current theme.

Reid Health Police Chief a Finalist for National Award

Posted February 17, 2022

Supplied Photo: Reid Health Police Chief Randy Kolentus (center)A national publication focused on public safety and security has named Reid Health Police Chief Randy Kolentus a finalist for its 2022 Healthcare Director of the Year award.

Winners and runners-up will be announced in June by Campus Safety Magazine, which covers issues involving the public safety and security of hospitals, schools, and universities across the country.

Kolentus is one of six finalists for the award. He was nominated by the Indiana chapter of the International Association for Healthcare Security and Safety (IAHSS).

"Previous finalists and winners of this award have been some of the most innovative leaders in the security industry. I am so honored and humbled to have been selected as a finalist," Kolentus said.

"I have met and become friends with people across the country in law enforcement and healthcare security, people who have been eager to share information and ideas that are truly changing healthcare security/police departments. I have learned so much from those folks as well."

In its profile of Kolentus, Campus Safety noted his work in transitioning Reid Health's security team to a police department, his leadership of the Indiana chapter of IAHSS that led it to being named the parent organization's 2020 Chapter of the Year, and his ability to identify ways to provide non-security help to Reid's overworked team members.

"Previous finalists and winners of this award have been some of the most innovative leaders in the security industry. I am so honored and humbled to have been selected as a finalist." -- Randy Kolentus, Reid Health Police Chief

"It truly has been fun and a pleasure to have worked with some really great people over the years, including our Reid team, a group that has supported me and the police department and helped me grow personally and professionally," Kolentus said.

Kolentus spent nearly three decades with the Richmond Police Department before coming to Reid 15 years ago. Last year, he was awarded the Sagamore of the Wabash, the highest honor given by an Indiana governor.

"I greatly appreciate Randy's work ethic and his leadership of the police department at Reid. Each officer reflects the mission, vision, and values of their leadership as well as the high caliber of character and integrity that Randy expects," said Pamela Jones, Vice President/General Counsel for Reid Health.

"I look forward to the department continuing to add innovative ways to ensure the security and safety of our patients, visitors, and team members."

International Women's Month - Celebrate and Thank the Women You Work With

Posted February 17, 2022

March is International Women's Month and we want to help you celebrate the women in your workplace. The Girls of Girls Inc. will be making gift boxes that contain:

  • a bracelet,
  • small cloth bag,
  • and a tissue flower.

All items will be handmade right down to the decor on the gift boxes. Each box is only $5.00 and will be personally delivered by a girl. Please contact us by March 2nd to guarantee delivery on March 16th.

**Proceeds helpt to inspire all girls to be Strong, Smart, and Bold!

To place your order email msoper@girlsincwayne.org the following information: number of women you want to recognize, list their names, location of work place, and total amount due.

Singles Interaction, Inc.

Posted February 17, 2022

Supplied Flyer: February 2022 Singles Interaction Newsletter

Supplied Flyer: March 2022 Singles Interaction Newsletter

If you are 21 years of age or better and single, divorced, widow or widower, Singles' Interaction invites you to join them on Friday nights. Come to the Eagles Lodge, 75 South 12th Street, Richmond (membership not required) and meet other single people in the Richmond area.

LifeStream's Healthy Aging Expo Returns in May for Drive-Thru Resources

Posted February 14, 2022

The community is invited to attend the drive-thru Healthy Aging Expo on Thursday, May 12. The expo is free to attend and the first 200 attendees will receive a complimentary lunch. Vendors will be set up tailgate style to share resources and all attendees will receive a resource bag with information on local activities and information for older adults.

The community can drive-thru the Healthy Aging Expo between 11:00am to 1:00pm at the Kuhlman Center located at 861 N. Salisbury Rd. Richmond, IN 47374. Attendees will enter at the NW L St. entrance. The Healthy Aging Expo is presented by Reid Health Alliance Medicare, The Leland Legacy, Kicks96, 101.7 The Point, and The Legend 95.3.

Those interested in sponsoring or setting up a tailgate at the Healthy Aging Expo should contact Angie Jenkins, Outreach Coordinator, at 765-759-1121 or ajenkins@lifestreaminc.org. More information on this event can be found at lifestreaminc.org/healthy-aging-expo.

Mario Garza Was Born to Run, but COVID-19 Has Taken That Away from Him

Posted February 17, 2022

Supplied Photo: Mario Garza, Inventory Control Clerk, Reid HealthRunning is a necessary part of Mario Garza's life. It's his "me" time. It's his prayer time. It's his getaway, his comfort zone.

The 50-year-old has participated in many off-course races, half-marathons, and 5Ks.

"I've always been active and on the go," he said. "I've just always wanted to be moving."

But for the past seven months, that essential piece of Garza has been missing. COVID-19 is to blame for that.

A native of Texas, Garza moved to Richmond in 2002 and settled in. Now an inventory control clerk at Reid Health, he's worked for the health system since 2007.

It was Reid's employee wellness program that led to Garza finding out he had COVID-19 before his first symptom had appeared. Garza needed to have a colonoscopy, so he went for a required COVID-19 test before the procedure. The test came back positive on a Sunday in July 2021. He began to feel ill for the first time the next day. By the following Thursday, things were getting worse.

Garza called his wife, Erin, an office assistant at Reid Oncology Associates, to tell her he was having a hard time breathing. That led to a trip to Reid's Urgent Care location in Richmond. A chest x-ray confirmed he needed to go to the Emergency Department.

"It was at a time when we thought COVID was over with," Garza said. "When I finally got to the hospital, they said this was the worst case they had seen in a while."

His illness came at the beginning of what would prove to be a new wave of cases fueled by the Delta variant. Garza was unvaccinated, having gone back and forth on whether he should get the shot.

"It was one of those things that I just had a lot of confusion about," he said. "I wore my mask and tried to do everything I could to stay healthy besides getting vaccinated. I thought it's not really going to affect me. I knew it was out there, but I thought I could prevent it."

"I went through all the emotions. I got angry. I got sad. I didn't want to speak to anybody. It made me humble to realize all the people who were helping me. I already made my peace that I might die. I made arrangements with my family about what was to be done if I didn't make it." -- Mario Garza

Once admitted to the hospital, Garza's symptoms continued to worsen. He eventually was taken to the Critical Care Unit, narrowly avoiding the need to be put on a ventilator.

"Fortunately, I overcame it. I was in here for 11 days, and the treatments were not easy," Garza said. "My nights became days, and my days became nights."

Adding to the difficulty was the fact that visitors weren't allowed to come into his room at the time. He could see his wife and co-workers on the other side of the glass window as they checked up on him, but he couldn't have the direct contact he craved.

"I went through all the emotions. I got angry. I got sad. I didn't want to speak to anybody," Garza said. "It made me humble to realize all the people who were helping me.

"I already made my peace that I might die. I made arrangements with my family about what was to be done if I didn't make it."

Supplied Photo: Mario and Erin Garza

Erin was "pretty much my backbone" during that time.

"She worked really hard," Garza said. "It was a lot of work for her."

Even once he returned home, Garza found the road to recovery difficult. The illness took a toll on his body. He was on oxygen for two weeks after leaving the hospital and was out of work for about a month. When he did return to his job, he was still short of breath, had brain fog, and his joints hurt.

Running -- that necessary part of his life -- was not an option, and depression set in.

"It was hard to keep it together," Garza said.

Although progress has been slow, it has come. Last month was the best yet in his recovery.

"My goal is to return to where I was, but it's almost like being on a mountain, you can be at the very top and slide off and then have to start over again at the bottom," Garza said.

"Mentally, I'm ready to go, but the body isn't. My goal is to get back to running in March."

In the meantime, rides on a stationary bike fill in for his regular runs. Looking back over the past seven months, Garza has some advice for those who remain unsure about vaccination.

"I believe in free choice, but I really urge people to get vaccinated," he said.

February 15's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 37
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 22 (59.5%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 3
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 1 (33.3%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 0
  • Tests submitted since last update: 219
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 26 (11.9% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 18

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are FREE. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you need to be tested for COVID-19, Reid offers drive-thru testing at 1200 Chester Blvd. in Richmond and at 2025 Virginia Ave. in Connersville. Appointments are required at both sites. The Richmond location is open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily while the Connersville location runs 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. To schedule an appointment, call Reid's COVID-19 Hotline.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Sen. Braun Staff Virtual Mobile Office Hour

Posted February 14, 2022

The Office of Senator Mike Braun will be hosting a virtual Mobile Office Hour for constituents in your community. Staff from our office will be available to speak with constituents virtually during the office hour time frame below. To accommodate as many constituents as possible each meeting will need to be no longer than 10 minutes in length. If you require additional time, our staff will follow up with you to ensure your issue or concern is fully addressed.

We are asking anyone wishing to attend the virtual Mobile Office to RSVP and work with our staff to schedule a time to discuss how our office can be of assistance. You may do so by emailing Regional Director Jerry Alexander at Jerry_Alexander@braun.senate.gov.

Please see below for details:

Date: Thursday, February 17, 2022

Time: 1:00PM - 3:00PM

Location: Virtual meeting. Meeting details and link to join will be sent to you with the confirmation of your RSVP.

If you have an opinion regarding legislation before the Senate or a policy concern, you can always contact the Senator directly by visiting our website.

Historic Summer Tent Theatre Holds Local and Regional Auditions

Posted February 14, 2022

Nettle Creek Players Is Seeking Actors of All Ages for Musicals

Nettle Creek Players, a professional summer stock tent theatre, will hold auditions for their 2022 Summer Season February 27-March 6 both in-person and via video submission. The in-person auditions will be held as follows: Sunday, February 27th from 1pm to 4pm at Indy Fringe Theatre, 719 E. Clair Street in Indianapolis; Monday, February 28th from 6pm to 8pm at the Basile Westfield Playhouse, 220 N. Union St. in Westfield; Saturday, March 5th from 2pm to 4pm at the Kennedy Library Meeting Room, 1700 W. McGalliard Rd. in Muncie; and Sunday, March 6th from 2pm to 4pm at Wilkinson Theatre in the Runyan Center at Earlham College, 801 National Rd. W. in Richmond.

The season includes "Oliver" and "A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum." Rehearsals begin June 12 for "Oliver" and the performances will run from June 24 to July 2. Rehearsals begin June 25 for "A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum" and the performances will run from July 8 to July 16.

To schedule an audition, actors should text 218-888-2674 or email ncpartdir@gmail.com and request an appointment. Actors are asked to provide a photo and resume and prepare 16 bars of a song in the style of contemporary Broadway musicals and a 1-minute monologue. An accompanist will NOT be provided for in-person auditions, but there will be a Bluetooth speaker, so actors should bring an accompaniment track on a Bluetooth enabled device. Video submissions will also be accepted prior to March 10 at ncpartdir@gmail.com. There are roles available for adult actors as well as teens and children ages 10 and above. Principal actor contracts will include a weekly salary and housing as needed. Adult chorus roles will include a travel stipend. There will be stage management, internship and educational opportunities available as well. Those interested in technical theatre should also request an audition time and prepare for a brief interview.

Performances will be in a giant circus tent in downtown Hagerstown, Indiana which is located one hour east of Indianapolis just off Interstate 70. Nettle Creek Players is Indiana's historic Summer Tent Theatre and has been presenting professional summer stock theatre under the tent in Hagerstown since 1971. This season will mark a return to the tent after a 2-year hiatus due to the pandemic. All auditions and interviews will be conducted by Artistic Director Greg Gasman. More information about the company can be found at www.nettlecreekplayers.com.

Testing for COVID-19 at Home? Here Are Some Things to Keep in Mind

Posted February 14, 2022

Free at-home COVID-19 tests from the federal government have made self-testing more widely available than anytime throughout the pandemic, and there are a few things to keep in mind if you use one of the kits.

When should you use a test?

If you have symptoms consistent with COVID-19 or have been in close contact with someone who has tested positive, you should get tested.

Even if you're symptom-free, if you're planning to attend an indoor gathering where social distancing will be difficult, it's wise to test beforehand to ensure you don't have an asymptomatic case.

The best timing for using an at-home test depends on your situation. If you have symptoms, test immediately. If you were a close contact of a positive person, wait at least 5 days after you were last around them. If you want to test before a gathering, do so immediately before leaving or as close to the time of the event as you can.

Tips for performing the test

First, make sure you're using one of the products that have been authorized by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration. Second, check the expiration date. If your test is past that date, you shouldn't use it.

It's critical you follow the manufacturer's instructions for testing precisely. Any changes to the order or timing can cause you to end up with a false reading.

What to do if you test positive

If you get a positive result, you should follow the guidelines from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention regarding isolation and wear a mask if you must be around others. Contact your primary care provider to let them know you've tested positive and to see if you might be eligible for treatment.

Should your symptoms become severe -- such as trouble breathing or shortness of breath -- immediately seek medical attention by calling 911 or going to the nearest Emergency Department.

Also, be sure to tell any close contacts they might have been exposed to the virus. Those would be anyone who you've been around for a total of 15 minutes over a 24-hour period going back to two days before your first symptom or if you don't have symptoms, two days before your positive test.

What to do if you test negative

If you have symptoms, a negative result means your illness might not be COVID-19 but it doesn't necessarily rule it out. False negatives are possible with at-home tests for a variety of reasons, including testing too early in the infection, user error, and more.

You should be tested again -- either by yourself or a healthcare provider -- if your symptoms remain a couple of days later. In the meantime, continue to practice preventative measures such as wearing a mask around others, staying socially distant, and washing your hands frequently.

If you don't have an at-home test or if you believe your result might be incorrect, Reid Health has drive-thru COVID-19 testing available at sites in Richmond (1200 Chester Blvd.) and Connersville (2025 Virginia Ave.). The Richmond site is open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily while the Connersville site runs 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Appointments are required at both locations. To schedule, call Reid's COVID-19 Hotline at (765) 965-4200. The hotline is open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. seven days a week.

February 10th's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 40
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 29 (72.5%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 3
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 3 (100%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 2
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 2 (100%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 170
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 24 (14.1% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 19

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are FREE. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you need to be tested for COVID-19, Reid offers drive-thru testing at 1200 Chester Blvd. in Richmond and at 2025 Virginia Ave. in Connersville. Appointments are required at both sites. The Richmond location is open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily while the Connersville location runs 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. To schedule an appointment, call Reid's COVID-19 Hotline.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

'You Don't See Widowhood at Age 48 in Your Future': A COVID-19 Story

Posted February 14, 2022

Two of the most important people in JoAnna Reisert's life tested positive for COVID-19 on the same day: Sept. 13, 2021.

It was a Monday. On the following Sunday, one -- her 74-year-old mother, Judy -- was fully recovered while the other -- her 47-year-old husband, Mark Reisert Jr. -- collapsed three times at home before heading to the hospital.

Judy was vaccinated for COVID-19. Mark was not.

"I was vaccinated, but my husband didn't believe in it initially. He wanted to wait it out," JoAnna said. "We talked about it, but in our marriage, we made our own decisions."

During the week that followed, Mark's views on the vaccines finally changed.

"That was the one thing he expressed to me in the hospital, 'I should have gotten vaccinated,'" JoAnna said.

By Wednesday, Mark was on a ventilator. By Saturday, he was gone.

High school sweethearts JoAnna and Mark had been together for 30 years, married for 27. They grew up in the area -- Mark in Connersville and JoAnna in Cambridge City -- and raised two kids of their own here, Ciara, 24, and Tyler, 20.

Mark, who was diabetic, worked various factory jobs to support JoAnna through nursing school.

"It's just mind-blowing that you can go from a 47-year-old grouchy hubby and working on blood sugars to disconnecting the only thing keeping him alive. You don't see widowhood at age 48 in your future." -- JoAnna Reisert

Shortly before Mark's death, the couple sold their home in Hagerstown and bought a property in Pershing next to Judy. The plan was to build a new house on the site.

"It's just mind-blowing that you can go from a 47-year-old grouchy hubby and working on blood sugars to disconnecting the only thing keeping him alive," JoAnna said. "You don't see widowhood at age 48 in your future."

Watching a loved one's health deteriorate is hard for everyone, but there were details that JoAnna, a nurse practitioner at Reid Health Primary & Specialty Care - Virginia Ave., knew better than many. She suddenly found herself on the receiving end of conversations she's had to have with patients many times over the years.

"I know what the looks mean because I'm the one who usually gives them. I know what 'comfortable' means. I know what the drip rates mean," she said. "It was very frightening. As a nurse practitioner, I knew what was happening, but you interpret it as a wife.

"There's nothing you can do. There's no gun or knife to protect you. There's nothing that can take it away. My only feeling was, 'Why can't I fix this? I can fix other people, so why can't I fix my husband?' There's nothing like it to describe the feeling of powerlessness."

The only power we do have, JoAnna said, is the power to protect ourselves before becoming infected -- getting vaccinated, wearing masks, social distancing, washing our hands.

"I think so many people unfortunately have political views about something that's not political," she said. "This is no different than mumps or measles back in the day. When those vaccines came out don't you think those people were scared, too?

"I can't bring my husband back, but others can sure prevent losing their own."

JoAnna's children hadn't been vaccinated either when they lost their father. In the time before his funeral service in October, they and their significant others finally got the shot.

"It doesn't bring him back, but it protects them in a way that he probably should have and didn't," she said.

"I think so many people unfortunately have political views about something that's not political," she said. "This is no different than mumps or measles back in the day. When those vaccines came out don't you think those people were scared, too? I can't bring my husband back, but others can sure prevent losing their own." -- JoAnna Reisert

In her first week back to work, JoAnna was faced with more skepticism about the virus. A patient told her he didn't believe in COVID-19. It doesn't exist, he said.

"The professional in me was like, 'Shut up and don't say anything,' but I couldn't help myself," JoAnna said. "I said, 'The weirdest thing happened to me last week. My husband just up and died from the thing you don't believe in.'

"I didn't talk the patient into vaccinating, but when he left my office, he at least knew this is much more serious than what he was seeing on TV. It's a shame that everything has to be this political nightmare. This is a health crisis.

"It's definitely a trial. We're losing so many people. It's just devastating."

February 8th's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 35
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 28 (80%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 2
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 2 (100%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 1
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 1 (100%)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 15

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are FREE. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you need to be tested for COVID-19, Reid offers drive-thru testing at 1200 Chester Blvd. in Richmond and at 2025 Virginia Ave. in Connersville. Appointments are required at both sites. The Richmond location is open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily while the Connersville location runs 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. To schedule an appointment, call Reid's COVID-19 Hotline.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Despite Challenges, Neighborhood Health Center Continues Growth

Posted February 14, 2022

Supplied Photo: Neighborhood Health Center Staff

Neighborhood Health Center in Richmond and Liberty continued to expand its patient base and add services in 2021, with even more changes and improvements coming this year.

"Our staff has continued to connect with patients and overcome barriers to bring care to hundreds of additional patients who were not receiving the regular services they needed," said Carrie Miles, CEO. She said the two locations welcomed over 1,000 new patients between them.

As the patient base has grown, so has the need to increase administrative support, she said. That includes adding a space soon dedicated to a growing human resources department, billing, coding, information technology, quality, accounting, and a classroom training space. We are excited to see our employment grow and improvement in our onboarding and orientation of staff.

The Richmond location celebrated three years in 2021, and the Liberty office celebrated two years of serving patients in the region.

Miles said the 10th Street Clinic in Richmond saw "tremendous growth" in family planning services, along with welcoming 589 new patients and completing 6,112 patient visits. Union County Medical Center provided over 7,130 patient visits for primary and mental health services and welcomed 464 new patients. Additionally, since opening, Union County helped nearly 400 patients obtain insurance coverage.

The center's governing board will add new members in 2022 after saying goodbye to several founding members – Delia Clark, Margaret Hampton, Dianne Reed, Caleb Smith and Jason Troutwine. "These members are a special group of people who are dedicated to our mission," Miles said. "Their perspectives have been invaluable. Their voices at our table will be missed."

Other highlights of the past year included:

  • Purchasing a van to provide mobile care
  • Adding staff including a bilingual registered nurse to assist the Latino population
  • Hosting a Naloxbox to distribute naloxone to the public
  • Increasing Medicare wellness exams

And opening a clinic at Earlham College to provide family planning services to students and faculty.

"This past year was a busy one for our centers. We expect 2022 to continue at a similar pace," Miles said. She said the growth and ability to serve more patients came while coping with the COVID pandemic and other challenges affecting healthcare delivery. "This remains a very challenging time in healthcare and the days can be weary. Our teams have continued to show up every day and care for our patients and each other. Our staff has done whatever it takes to ensure our patients are cared for throughout this entire pandemic. They are the true heroes in all this. They are what NHC a special place." she said. "I am filled with both pride and gratitude for everything our team has accomplished together. We have faithfully provided care to our patients despite the many challenges while encouraging and supporting each other at each step. The dedication of our staff, community partners, providers, and governing board has been inspiring. I do not say lightly what an incredible impact everyone has had toward the positive outcomes we have seen this year, despite the hardships."

The centers accept all patients, regardless of ability to pay, and offers assistance in finding coverage for patients when possible. A sliding scale for payment allows fees to be based on family size and income.

NHC providers offer extended hours at both clinics. NHC 10th Street offers extended hours on Mondays and Tuesdays until 7 p.m. Union County Medical Center has extended hours on Tuesdays and Thursdays until 7 p.m.

Communities In Schools of Indiana Announces Transformative Investment to Help Students Overcome Obstacles to Learning

Posted February 14, 2022

$133.5 Million Donation from Philanthropist MacKenzie Scott Will Deepen Organization's Impact in 3,000 Schools Across the Country

(February 3) Communities In Schools of Indiana, the local affiliate of the national organization working to ensure every student, regardless of race, zip code, or history of marginalization has what they need to succeed in school and beyond, today announced it is part of a unprecedented gift from philanthropist MacKenzie Scott to the Communities In Schools Network and National Office. Ms. Scott's gift of $800,000 to CIS of Indiana is the largest gift CIS of Indiana has ever received, and it will enable the organization to expand its impact in more schools struggling to fund the increasing needs of Hoosier children.

In a time when the global pandemic has created unparalleled challenges for students and families, including experiences of social isolation, economic crisis, stress, and trauma, this investment will help CIS of Indiana to carry out its cause to build sustainable systems of support for the students and families that would otherwise be left behind. An investment in CIS to use its model and evidence base to help students overcome obstacles to learning is tremendous fuel for impact, infrastructure, and the people working inside schools. However, it does not change the reality of the continued work ahead, and the public and private partnership that must remain true.

"As a former school leader, I know firsthand the impact a caring adult can have on the life of a child. The role CIS of Indiana serves in our school buildings and their surrounding communities is invaluable," said Hadley Moore Vlahogeorge, Executive Director of CIS of Indiana, which currently serves over 26,000 students in 31 schools in Central Indiana. Indianapolis school districts employing the CIS model include the Metropolitan School Districts of Lawrence and Decatur Townships and the Indianapolis Public Schools, and other sites are operating in Bloomington, Lafayette, and Randolph County. There are two additional CIS affiliates serving even more Hoosier students in Lake and Wayne counties.

For nearly a decade, thanks to the championship of statewide expansion by the late Senator Richard Lugar, Communities in Schools of Indiana has demonstrated measurable success in student outcomes. In the 2020-2021 school year, 100% percent of K-11 students were promoted to the next grade, and 97% percent of seniors graduated or received a GED. In the 2021-2022 school year, CIS of Indiana has increased its impact from 26 schools to the current 31, and the organization is hopeful this gift will afford more districts the opportunity to partner with CIS and bring much-needed attention to the urgent challenges of our school communities. Demand is high for intensive student supports, and it will take investments from multiple sectors to support Indiana's \children and adolescents, culminating in a healthier state that can remain an economic competitor. The Communities in Schools evidence-based model adapts to serve students grades K-12 in a variety of school settings- urban, rural, and suburban- unlike competitors who focus on the lower grades in cities with abundant resources and funding.

Dr. Suellen Reed, Indiana's Superintendent of Public Instruction from 1993-2009 and Secretary of CIS of Indiana's Board of Directors shared that "CIS works in Indiana, and we have the data to show that the program really makes a difference. The support keeps students in school and on the road to be successful citizens. I am proud to serve with the distinguished members of the state board of CIS. The proven record of success in public schools inspires us to continue to seek the means to keep successful programs going where they have been implemented and to make services available to meet the needs of students throughout our state. Today's announcement indicates confidence in our work and a significant investment in its continuance."

CIS believes that transformative relationships are key to unlocking a student's potential. Our school-based staff works inside schools in partnership with teachers and parents to help address the non-academic needs of students. CIS coordinates with schools and local service providers to meet the needs of students and families, as well as providing critical resources, like food, housing, healthcare, counseling, access to remote technology, and more so that students (and educators) can focus on academics. By identifying the points of challenge for students in their personal lives, CIS staff helps to empower students to move beyond the barriers they face in the school building and in the community.

"Today is an important day for students who are underserved, under-resourced, and in need of supports to build a brighter future," said Rey Saldaña, President and CEO of Communities In Schools. "This unrestricted gift allows us to combat the inequities in public education and reimagine the way schools operate and show up for all students. Our National goal is to bring our model inside of every one of the 70,000 Title I-eligible schools in the country; currently, we operate in 3,000 schools – so we still have a long way to go, and we will need ongoing support to get there.

Senior Adult Ministry February Meeting

Posted January 31, 2022

The Senior Adult Ministry will worship God through song at its February sing-along. Seniors who are 50 years or older are invited to join us at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, February 22, at First United Methodist Church, 318 National Road West, Richmond, IN.

Please bring a snack to share with the group if you can.

Invite a friend to enjoy the food and fellowship each month. Programs for 2022 include the Sweet Sounds of Starr Valley dulcimer group, a pitch-in picnic at Veteran's Park, Everyone's birthday, and Beautiful candles: how it's done.

Senior Adult Ministry is an active group of seniors over 50 years old open to all regardless of religious affiliation. The group is guided by Pastor Judi Marshall, Clara Bulmer and Beverly Kirby. These three women actively share their gifts of ministry, hospitality and creativity in planning and organizing the monthly meetings.

For further information, call 765-962-4357.

Lively Arts Series Welcomes IU Soul Revue, Art Exhibitions and Music Concerts Over Spring Semester of Events

Posted January 26, 2022

Lively Arts Series calendar
The Lively Arts Series calendar for spring 2022 is available to download.
IU Soul Revue
IU Soul Revue returns to perform at IU East's Student Events Center on Lingle Court this March as part of the Lively Arts Series. IU Soul Revue is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year.
Alison Moore, soprano, and adjunct instructor at IU East
Alison Moore, soprano, and adjunct instructor at IU East
Peter Douglas, piano, class piano instructor and accompanist for the IU East Richmond Chorale
Peter Douglas, piano, class piano instructor and accompanist for the IU East Richmond Chorale
"KuroKuroShiro DI" by Nishiki Sugawara-Beda.
"Potters of Earth and Sea" by Paul Andrew Wandless.

Indiana University East's Lively Arts Series is underway for spring 2022, bringing one of its biggest events back to campus in March.

Join IU East as the campus welcomes IU Soul Revue under the direction of IU East alumnus James Strong in concert at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, March 10, in the Student Events Center. Ticket information will be announced at a later time.

Students, faculty, staff and the community are invited to come and enjoy the many Lively Arts Series events that will be held throughout the semester.

The Lively Arts Series is presented by First Bank Richmond in partnership with WCTV.

IU Soul Revue

Among the Lively Arts Series' events is the IU Soul Revue. Producing dynamic performances of R&B, soul, funk and contemporary Black popular music for half a century, the IU Soul Revue is the nation's first accredited Black popular music ensemble.

The one-of-a-kind ensemble is back to celebrate its 50th anniversary with IU East alumnus James Strong as its director.

Strong, a former member of IU Soul Revue himself, is a prominent bassist, musical director and producer. He earned his Bachelor of Science in Business Administration through IU East's online degree completion program in 2013.

The IU Soul Revue has opened for famous musical artists such as James Brown, The Emotions, Booker T. Jones, and Bootsy Collins.

Alison Moore, soprano, and Peter Douglas, piano: "Selected Works of Cécile Chaminade"

The first concert of the season is at 7 p.m. on Monday, January 24, with a performance by soprano Alison Moore and pianist Peter Douglas. The concert will be held in Vivian Auditorium, located in Whitewater Hall, and streamed live on IU East's Facebook page.

Moore will perform "Selected Works of Cécile Chaminade." Chaminade, a French composer and pianist, broke the glass ceiling as a female composer near the turn of the 20th century.

Moore is an established teacher and performer. She received her Master of Music degree in Voice Performance from Wichita State University and a Bachelor of Music degree from North Park University Chicago. She is currently completing her Doctor of Arts in Voice Performance and Choral Conducting at Ball State University.

Throughout her career, Moore has enjoyed performing art song, musical theater, and operatic literature. When not performing, she teaches applied voice lessons at IU East and directs the University Choral Ensemble.

Performing as a collaborative pianist, organist, and solo pianist, Douglas has established a career as a versatile performing artist. His performances have taken him throughout the United States and globally to Europe and South America.

He is currently a doctoral candidate (ABD) at Ball State University pursuing a Doctor of Arts Degree in Piano Chamber Music and Accompanying with a secondary in Music Theory/Composition. At IU East, he teaches class piano and accompanies the IU East Richmond Chorale. He is an organist/collaborative pianist at First Presbyterian Church in Muncie and maintains a busy freelance collaborative piano schedule performing with singers, instrumentalists, dancers, chamber groups and choral ensembles.

Nishiki Sugawara-Beda: "Can You Find Space" art exhibition

Nishiki Sugawara-Beda's art exhibition, "Can You Find Space," is on display now through February 18 and can be viewed in the Meijer Artway, located in Whitewater Hall.

Sugawara-Beda, born and raised in Japan, is a Japanese-American visual artist specializing in painting and installation. She earned her Master of Fine Arts from Indiana University and a Bachelor of Arts from Portland State University. She is currently an assistant professor of painting and drawing at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas. She also offers lectures nationally and internationally as a way to promote cultural diversity and exchange.

Sugawara-Beda's work has been displayed in venues across the country, including Spartanburg Art Museum (South Carolina), Morris Graves Museum of Art (California), Dennos Museum (Michigan) and Amos Eno Gallery (New York).

Paul Andrew Wandless: "Prints & Sculpture" art exhibition

Paul Wandless' art exhibition "Prints & Sculpture" can be viewed now through February 23 in the Tom Thomas gallery, located in Whitewater Hall.

Wandless was born in Miami, Florida, and raised in Smyrna, Delaware. He earned his Master of Fine Arts from Arizona State University, his Master of Arts from Minnesota State University-Mankato, and his Bachelor of Fine Arts from the University of Delaware.

Wandless employs a variety of sculptural techniques and explores many artistic mediums. He incorporates clay, printmaking, stone carving, mold making, leather working, metalsmithing and wood carving into his work, either individually or in combination with one another. His artwork has been widely exhibited and has been published in 16 books.

Third Annual Spanish Film Festival

The World Languages and Cultures department invites the IU East community to view online screenings of the Third Annual Spanish Film Festival. This year, the department will feature films and documentaries that reflect on the creation of spaces and boundaries and the ways in which people occupy or defy them.

Films will be screened on Zoom at https://iu.zoom.us/j/4100113506. For those interested to watch the film at a different time, contact Felix Burgos, assistant professor of World Languages and Cultures, at fburgos@iu.edu. After the first screening, the film will be available for one week.

The IU East Spanish Film Festival is sponsored by the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, the World Languages and Cultures Department and the Diversity and Inclusion Commission.

The Spanish Film Club series was made possible with the support of Pragda, SPAIN arts & culture and the Secretary of State for Culture of Spain.

    Lively Arts Series Schedule
  • Nishiki Sugawara-Beda: "Can You Find Space"
    January 10 - February 18, Meijer Artway, Whitewater Hall
  • Paul Andrew Wandless: "Prints & Sculpture"
    January 10 - February 23, Tom Thomas Gallery
  • Reception and Artist's Talk: February 23, 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

  • Alison Moore, soprano, and Peter Douglas, piano
    January 24, Vivian Auditorium and IU East Facebook Live at iue.edu/facebook, 7 p.m.
  • Faculty and Friends Concert
    February 17, Vivian Auditorium, 7 p.m.
  • Third Annual Spanish Film Festival
    February 2 - March 9
    Zoom Link for Screenings: https://iu.zoom.us/j/4100113506
  • Whitney Sage
    February 28 - April 22, Meijer Artway
  • Felicia Szorad and Travis Townsend
    March 4 - April 15, Tom Thomas Gallery
  • Michael Rondstadt String Quartet
    March 7, Vivian Auditorium, 7 p.m.
  • IU Soul Revue
    March 10, Student Events Center, 6:30 p.m.
  • Chromatic Array: The Saxophone Music of Nathan Froebe, featuring guest saxophonist Nick May
    March 31, Vivian Auditorium, 7 p.m.
  • Chorale, Pep Band, and Senior Capstone Concerts and Presentations
    Month of April (dates to follow)
  • Music Student Recital
    April 26, Vivian Auditorium, 7 p.m.
  • Senior Capstone Exhibition and Student Showcase
    April 29 - 8, Tom Thomas Gallery and Meijer Artway
    Reception: April 28, 5:30-7 p.m.

Let's Talk Returns for Its 11th Season This February

Posted January 26, 2022

This spring, Let's Talk returns with three episodes focusing on the importance of vaccinations and end-of-life care and planning.

The 11th season will be streamed from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Indiana University East's Facebook page at iue.edu/facebook and will air on WCTV Channel 20. Kara Bellew, director of Career Services at IU East, will host the series.

The series is produced by Rosalie Aldrich, John and Corinne Graf Professor and chair of the Department of Communication Studies at IU East.

"I am very proud to work with community partners such as Reid Health, WCTV, and Wayne County Emergency Communications," Aldrich said. "We also have members of the IU East School of Humanities and Social Sciences and the School of Nursing and Health Sciences on the planning committee. We work together to bring in experts to discuss topics important to the local community."

Aldrich notes that the Let's Talk series has covered many important topics over its 11-year run.

"Topics have included opioid addiction, cancer prevention/treatment/survivorship, maternal and infant health, disaster planning, among others," Aldrich said.

The first episode, "COVID-19 and the importance of vaccinations," airs at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, February 8. Speakers include Matt Bailey, pharmacist at Reid Health, and Karen Clark, dean of the IU East School of Nursing and Health Sciences.

The COVID-19 pandemic has been ongoing since 2019. Over that time, the United States alone has had 50.8 million reported cases, and over 805,000 deaths caused by the virus.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that everyone five and older receive the vaccination, with a preference for an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine (Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna).

Currently, only 61.4% of people who live in the United States are fully vaccinated. During this episode, experts will discuss the vaccines-including safety, effectiveness, myths and facts and address frequently asked questions.

The second episode airs at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, February 22, and discusses "HPV and the importance of vaccinations for girls and boys."

The human papillomavirus (HPV) is a group of related viruses. HPV infections are very common. According to the National cancer Institute, in the United States there is an estimated 24 million active cases and 5.5 million new cases each year. HPV can cause various cancers and is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the U.S.

Speakers Cindy Evans, clinical assistant professor for the IU East School of Nursing and Health Sciences, and Carolyn Judd, lecturer for IU East School of Nursing and Health Sciences, will discuss how to prevent HPV, who should get HPV vaccinations, and the effectiveness of the vaccinations.

The season will wrap up with episode three at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, March 8. Jessica Curd, visiting lecturer with the IU East School of Social Work, is the guest speaker for "End of Life Discussions and Decisions."

According to the AARP, "How we want to die is the most important and costly conversation Americans aren't having." During this episode, panelists will discuss what to consider before having the end-of-life conversation with loved ones, what things to consider, and how to get the conversation started.

Viewers are encouraged to submit questions on the Let's Talk Facebook page, http://facebook.com/iueletstalk, or to call in with their questions prior to or during the broadcast at (765) 973-8587.

Upcoming Schedule for Let's Talk

  • Topic: COVID-19 and the importance of vaccinations
    7 p.m., Tuesday, February 8
    Speakers:
    Matt Bailey, Pharm.D., pharmacist at Reid Health
    Karen Clark, Ed.D., R.N., dean of the IU East School of Nursing and Health Sciences, director for the Center for Health Promotion, IU East
  • Topic: HPV and the importance of vaccinations for girls and boys
    7 p.m., Tuesday, February 22
    Speakers:
    Cindy Evans, D.N.P., A.P.R.N., W.H.N.P.-B.C., clinical assistant professor for the IU East School of Nursing and Health Sciences
    Carolyn Judd, M.S., lecturer for IU East School of Nursing and Health Sciences
  • Topic: End of Life Discussions and Decisions
    7 p.m., Tuesday, March 8
    Speaker:
    Jessica Curd, L.C.S.W., A.C.S.W., A.C.H.P.-S.W., A.P.H.S.W.-C., visiting lecturer for the IU East School of Social Work and Ph.D. candidate at the IU School of Social Work

Moderna's COVID-19 Vaccine Now Has Full Approval from FDA

Posted February 6, 2022

Earlier this week, the Moderna version of the COVID-19 vaccine became the second to receive full approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), joining Pfizer, which was approved in late August 2021.

Anyone 18 years and older can receive the Moderna vaccine, which is given as a two-shot series with the second dose coming 28 days after the first. Those who are moderately to severely immunocompromised should receive a third dose 28 days after their second.

Those who are fully vaccinated with Moderna should get a booster shot of either the Moderna or Pfizer vaccines five months after their second dose.

The vaccine uses mRNA to give instructions to the protein-making machinery of muscle cells at the injection site, telling them how to temporarily make a harmless spike protein that's found on the surface of the virus that causes COVID-19. The spike protein triggers your body's immune response, allowing it to build immunity against the virus. Once the instructions are passed on, your cells get rid of the mRNA. It never enters the nucleus of the cells where the DNA resides, and it doesn't cause any genetic changes.

Moderna -- like the other COVID-19 vaccines authorized for use in the United States -- has proven to be safe and effective in protecting against severe illness, including from the Omicron variant that's currently dominant in our area.

If you would like to be vaccinated for COVID-19, Reid Health is giving out FREE primary doses and booster shots at Lingle Grand Hall on the lower level of Reid's main campus in Richmond. Hours there are 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays.

The clinic is closed the rest of this week because of the winter storm but will reopen Monday.

You don't have to schedule an appointment or pre-register. Walk-ins are welcome, and there are no long wait times.

For those who would like to make an appointment, Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule a time by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov. You may also call Reid's vaccine clinic directly at (765) 935-8484.

February 3rd's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 49
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 35 (71.4%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 2
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 2 (100%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 1
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 1 (100%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 177
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 53 (29.9% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 20

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are FREE. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you need to be tested for COVID-19, Reid offers drive-thru testing at 1200 Chester Blvd. in Richmond and at 2025 Virginia Ave. in Connersville. Appointments are required at both sites. The Richmond location is open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily while the Connersville location runs 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. To schedule an appointment, call Reid's COVID-19 Hotline.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

AL-ANON Meetings (Virtual)

Posted February 2, 2022

Al-Anon offers help and hope for families and friends of problem drinkers. It is an anonymous fellowship and there are no dues or fees. Meetings are held VIRTUALLY Mondays from 7:30 to 8:30 pm.

New members are always welcome. For further information, contact us at feelingsoffreedomrichmond@gmail.com or call 765-966-4151 and leave a message.

IU East-Based Online Psychology Program Earns Top 10 Us News Ranking

Posted February 2, 2022

Supplied Photo: IU East students study in Whitewater Hall Lobby.
IU East students study in Whitewater Hall Lobby.

Recently, IU East's Bachelor of Psychology online program was ranked in the top 10 by U.S. News and World Report's Best Online Education Program rankings.

The online psychology bachelor's program offered through the Indiana University East Department of Psychology has jumped into the top ten of the latest U.S. News and World Report's Best Online Education Program rankings.

The B.S. in Psychology online moved up three spots to No. 8 in the rankings revealed January 25.

The Department of Psychology is part of the IU East School of Humanities and Social Sciences.

The psychology bachelor's degree is part of IU Online, which ranked No. 29 for online bachelor's degree programs overall. IU has been a forerunner in online programs at both the undergraduate and graduate level for more than 20 years, now offering more than 213 online degree and certificate programs. A complete list of IU's online programs is available on IU Online's website.

The online offerings at IU also received recognition for their accessibility, affordability and reputation among veterans. IU Online tied for No. 40 among best online bachelor's programs for veterans.

Among other rankings, the IU Online bachelor's program for business, a collaboration of IU's statewide regional campuses including IU East, tied for 17th in that specialty.

Across IU, several programs earned high rankings, including top rankings for business and education specialties and top marks for nursing programs.

Reid Health Thankful for Help from National Guard Members

Posted February 1, 2022

A team of National Guard members recently finished its deployment to Reid Health after lending a hand during the COVID-19 emergency.

Guard members arrived at the hospital just before the New Year, beginning four weeks of work in patient care and non-clinical roles. Medics among the team helped with rounding, taking vitals, patient transport, and other tasks while the others cleaned rooms, waiting room chairs, and wheelchairs; emptied linens and trash; stocked supplies; and answered phones.

"It was tremendous having them here," said Ryan Williams, Director of EMS, Forensics, and Trauma Services for Reid Health. "The soldiers were so helpful and stayed busy the entire time. Our staff was incredibly grateful for the assistance."

Feedback received by Williams from the Guard members' superiors indicated the team enjoyed its time at Reid.

"When I spoke with their sergeant, he said, 'We don't want to leave here! You all have been so friendly, helpful, and welcoming!'," Williams said. "He also shared that when the Guard chaplain who oversees 16 units deployed in central and northern Indiana visited the team, the group here was one of only two that reported no issues with their assigned facilities."

Reid joined health systems around Indiana and beyond in seeking help from the National Guard during the emergency created by the Delta and Omicron variants of COVID-19. Members of the team who worked in Richmond have been bouncing from hospital to hospital since August, taking on small roles wherever they can.

Although the Guard members have moved on, patient levels remain high at Reid Health. It's crucial we all do whatever we can to prevent further spread of the virus. That means getting vaccinated if you haven't already. If you have been vaccinated, get a booster shot if you're eligible.

Regardless of vaccination status, everyone should wear masks while in public places, observe social distancing, be sure to frequently wash their hands, stay home if they aren't feeling well, and get tested for COVID-19 if they have symptoms or have been exposed to someone who has tested positive. Every layer of protection we add makes it that much harder for the virus to spread.

"It was tremendous having them here. The soldiers were so helpful and stayed busy the entire time. Our staff was incredibly grateful for the assistance." -- Ryan Williams, Director of EMS, Forensics, and Trauma Services for Reid Health

If you would like to be vaccinated for COVID-19, Reid Health is giving out FREE primary doses and booster shots at Lingle Grand Hall on the lower level of Reid's main campus in Richmond. Hours there are 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays.

You don't have to schedule an appointment or pre-register. Walk-ins are welcome, and there are no long wait times.

For those who would like to make an appointment, Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule a time by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov. You may also call Reid's vaccine clinic directly at (765) 935-8484.

Febrary 1st's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 53
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 35 (66%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 6
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 5 (83.3%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 1
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 1 (100%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 219
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 44 (20.1% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 13

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are FREE. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you need to be tested for COVID-19, Reid offers drive-thru testing at 1200 Chester Blvd. in Richmond and at 2025 Virginia Ave. in Connersville. Appointments are required at both sites. The Richmond location is open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily while the Connersville location runs 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. To schedule an appointment, call Reid's COVID-19 Hotline.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Reid Health Activates Winter Weather Plan Ahead of Storm

Posted February 2, 2022

With the forecast calling for a mix of ice and heavy snow over the coming hours, Reid Health has activated its winter weather plan to ensure the health system can continue to offer quality care during and after the storm.

As a result of the weather, some Reid Health practices may close or conduct business virtually. Those offices impacted will contact anyone who has a scheduled appointment to reschedule their visit or move the visit to telehealth instead. The latest list of delays and closures can be found on Reid's Facebook and Twitter pages.

All Reid volunteer programs are cancelled through Sunday. They'll resume Monday, Feb. 7.

The COVID-19 vaccination clinic at Lingle Grand Hall on the main campus in Richmond will be closed Thursday through Saturday to allow the space to instead be used by staff remaining at the hospital between their shifts. Appointments already made for those days will be rescheduled.

Reid's COVID-19 testing sites in Richmond and Connersville also will be closed Thursday.

Anyone needing to seek urgent care can do so virtually through Reid Health NOW, which is priced at $29 with the coupon code 29NOW through the end of February.

No matter the weather, patient care does not stop at Reid, and you should never delay care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.

The Reid Engineering crew will work around the clock to keep sidewalks and parking lots clear and salted at the health system's facilities. Should a power outage occur at the hospital, generators will automatically turn on to provide continuous power for the inpatient tower.

If you have an emergency, call 911 immediately. Reid Health EMS service will remain available throughout and following the storm.

"We have contingency plans in place should any of our stations lose power," said Ryan Williams, Director of EMS, Forensics, and Trauma Services for Reid Health. "We've also worked with the county highway department to ensure we'll have support from their snowplows to assist the ambulances to the location of an emergency."

INDOT Prepares for Major Winter Storm Statewide, Asks Motorists to Avoid Unnecessary Travel

Posted February 1, 2022

The Indiana Department of Transportation is preparing for a major winter storm expected to impact all regions of the state over the next 2-3 days.

Supplied Graphic: Expected Snowfall MapThe National Weather Service (NWS) has issued winter storm warnings for areas north of I-70 from 7 a.m. Wednesday morning to 1 a.m. Friday morning and winter storm watches are in effect for central and southern parts of Indiana.

NWS is calling for significant snowfall and the potential for ice accumulation across the state during this winter storm.

INDOT will be at a full call with nearly 1,000 trucks treating and plowing highways across the state beginning overnight Tuesday into Wednesday morning. Trucks will remain out in full force for the duration of the winter storm and afterword to continue cleanup efforts.

Road conditions across the state will be challenging as the storm moves through. INDOT's goal is to keep highways passable during the storm, but motorists that must travel should expect to encounter snow and ice covered roads, blowing and drifting, and whiteout conditions.

Rain is expected across most of the state beginning Tuesday evening leading into a wintry mix overnight meaning that in most cases INDOT will not be able to pretreat roads in advance of the snow and ice. Without pretreatment, highways are more likely to develop slick spots and snow to stick to pavement and bridges.

INDOT urges motorists to stay off the roads and avoid unnecessary travel to allow plow truck drivers room to work safely and so they may complete their routes as quickly as possible.

If you do have to travel, slow down, increase following distance, don't crowd plow trucks, give yourself extra time, and travel with an emergency kit. Monitor real-time travel conditions at trafficwise.org and be sure to check in.gov/dhs/traveladvisory for travel advisories in your area.

IU East Brings 3D Anatomy and Physiology Learning Technology to the Classroom

Posted January 26, 2022

Anatomage Table provides virtual hands-on learning for anatomy, physiology classes

Supplied Photo: IU East 3D anatomy and physiology lab 1
Jeffery Sweet from Anatomage, Inc. demonstrates the Anatomage Table for IU East's School of Natural Science and Mathematics faculty and staff. The 3D anatomy and physiology technology will soon be implemented in on campus classes.
Supplied Photo: IU East 3D anatomy and physiology lab 2
IU East students (right to left) Grace Cull, a junior biology major from Richmond, and Chloe Mitchell, a sophomore biochemistry major from Greenville, Ohio, learn to use the Anatomage Table with Brian Olson, lecturer for the School of Natural Science and Mathematics.
Supplied Photo: IU East 3D anatomy and physiology lab 3
Junior biology major, Grace Cull takes a closer look at the skeletal anatomy of a canine. The Anatomage Table provides simulated human and animal options to learn tissue, blood vessel, bone and organ anatomy.
Supplied Photo: IU East 3D anatomy and physiology lab 4
The Anatomage Table offer both a horizontal and vertical option for students to learn during anatomy and physiology classes on campus.

Students at Indiana University East's School of Natural Science and Mathematics can look forward to a new learning tool for their anatomy and physiology classes on campus.

Rather than using a scalpel to perform a dissection, students preparing for a career in health science will now use an Anatomage virtual dissecting table. This table allows students to learn human anatomy by providing a life-sized display of the human body.

Using virtual controls, an instructor or students may peel back layers of tissue and examine bones, blood vessels and organs. Students may even use a virtual scalpel tool to make incisions, cut away portions of the body and inspect different cross-sections of any anatomical structures.

"The Anatomage Table is a state-of-the-art teaching tool that will provide students an active and enriching educational experience,"said Associate Professor of Biology Parul Khurana, Ph.D. "With streaming, video recording and screen capture capabilities, it is an innovative technological solution for realistic anatomical studies in the classroom and online environments. The table will help elevate the quality of instruction, improve student engagement and learning, and prepare them for advanced studies."

Brian Olson is a lecturer in biology at IU East. He said he is looking forward to giving aspiring health professionals a realistic experience.

"The anatomage table offers students the opportunity to review diagnostic images that correlate to case studies of a variety of health conditions," Olson said. "This will give students experience in real life scenarios enabling them to enhance their problem solving skills."

The table will primarily be used in courses that prepare students for a career in health sciences, such as IU East's nursing program or the Bachelor of Science in Human Life Science and Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry degrees.

The human life science degree is popular among students who wish to pursue physical or occupational therapy, or to become physician assistants, while the biochemistry degree is popular among students who want to go to medical school.

The abilities of the Anatomage Table goes beyond teaching anatomy and physiology.

"The table can also simulate the anatomy of cats, dogs, frogs and various other animals," said Dean of the School of Natural Sciences and Mathematics Markus Pomper, Ph.D. "We hope that this new tool will get students enthusiastic about studying life sciences."

The Anatomage Table is reserved for use in on campus classes, but the school will offer demonstration sessions at various IU East events.

For more information on IU East's School of Natural Science and Mathematics, visit https://www.iue.edu/nsm/index.html.

4 Reasons Why COVID-19 Vaccination Is Better Than Relying on 'Natural Immunity' From Infection

Posted January 26, 2022

One reason often cited for not getting vaccinated against COVID-19 is the belief that "natural immunity" gained from being infected with the virus is just as good -- if not better -- than the immunity created by the vaccines.

There are a few problems with that line of thinking, four in particular.

1. You don't know if you'll have mild or severe illness

There's no way to know ahead of time how sick you might get if you become infected with the virus that causes COVID-19. Generalizations can be made about your risk based on factors such as your age or underlying health, but there's no guarantee such a generalization will be true for you in particular.

Throughout the pandemic, there have been many stories of those who believed they had nothing to fear from the virus only to find themselves hospitalized or worse when they became sick.

There's also no way to know whether you might have long-lasting side effects, which have come to be known as "long COVID." Those can include a loss of stamina, a loss of taste and smell, prolonged "brain fog," and more.

2. You don't know how long your immunity will last

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the level of protection received from having COVID-19 can vary depending on how mild or severe the illness was, the time since infection, your age, and any underlying health conditions. There is no way to reliably determine if a person is currently protected from re-infection.

The vaccines create a more predictable immune response than infection, providing a high level of protection against severe illness.

There's evidence that shows getting a vaccine after you recover from COVID-19 boosts your immune system. According to one study, those who don't get vaccinated after their recovery from the virus are two times more likely to get the virus again when compared to those who were fully vaccinated after their recovery.

3. Getting infected makes you another link in the chain of spread

When you become infected with the virus, you're contagious before symptoms begin to appear. That means even if you follow CDC isolation/quarantine guidelines, you still could spread the virus to others in the days before you realize you're sick.

Getting vaccinated not only protects yourself, it protects all those around you and all those around them, particularly anyone at increased risk for severe illness because of their age or a health condition such as cancer, a recent organ transplant, or something else that compromises their immune system.

4. Every time the virus reproduces in the body, it has the chance to mutate and create a new variant

When viruses take over cells in our body, they use the cells' machinery to make more of the virus. That process isn't perfect. Copying mistakes are made, leading to mutations in the virus. Sometimes those changes end up being harmless. Other times they lead to the emergence of variants such as the Delta and Omicron versions that have created so much havoc since the fall.

The more the virus that causes COVID-19 spreads, the more likely it is another variant will emerge to cause new problems. Vaccination reduces the chances for the virus to spread.

The bottom line is this: Relying on "natural immunity" is a bad idea. The benefits from being vaccinated far outweigh the risks that come from infection.

Reid Health is giving out FREE primary doses and booster shots of the vaccines at Lingle Grand Hall on the lower level of Reid's main campus in Richmond. Hours there are 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays.

You don't have to schedule an appointment or pre-register. Walk-ins are welcome, and there are no long wait times.

For those who would like to make an appointment, Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule a time by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov. You may also call Reid's vaccine clinic directly at (765) 935-8484.

January 25th's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 56
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 39 (69.6%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 7
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 4 (57.1%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 4
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 2 (50%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 363
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 65 (17.9% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 25

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are FREE. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you need to be tested for COVID-19, Reid offers drive-thru testing at 1200 Chester Blvd. in Richmond and at 2025 Virginia Ave. in Connersville. Appointments are required at both sites. The Richmond location is open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily while the Connersville location runs 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. To schedule an appointment, call Reid's COVID-19 Hotline.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County Name New Chief Operating Officer

Posted January 24, 2022

Supplied Photo:  Rachel Winters
Rachel Winters, COO

The Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County named Rachel Winters as their new Chief Operating Officer. Winters earned her Bachelor of Science in Social Work at Miami University in 2017 and has served at the Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County's Richard E. Jeffers Unit as Unit Coordinator and Unit Director since 2018.

"I am excited for this next step in my journey with the Boys & Girls Club," Winters said of her new position. "I think it is so important to focus on each of our staff's strengths and foster those to create the best Club experience possible."

The role of Chief Operating Officer is a new position replacing the previous Director of Operations. In this position, Winters is responsible for the Clubs' day-to-day operations, providing strong leadership to staff and volunteers, and implementing new strategic initiatives related to areas such as operations, program services, program expansion, innovation, membership growth, and human resources.

"Rachel is an excellent addition to our Executive Team," Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County Chief Executive Officer Alicia Painter remarked. "Her leadership style balances and compliments my own, and I know from years of working with her that she is a competent, caring professional with a true heart for the Club."

While Winters assumes the role of COO today, she already has aspirations for new Club programming designed to meet the challenges presented by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Winters noted, "Our kids have really had a hard time in the last few years connecting with peers in a way that is healthy and supportive. It is so important that we bring social emotional learning programs into every aspect of Club programming to help them manage their emotions and develop healthy identities."

The mission of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County is to enable all young people, especially those who need us most, to reach their full potential as productive, caring, and responsible citizens. Members of the Club, ages 6-18, have access to dedicated, trained professionals who provide guidance in adopting healthy lifestyles and pursuing educational objectives. Currently, the Club serves over 2,700 youth at five locations: the Jeffers, McDaniel, First Bank, Western Wayne, and Hagerstown units and during the summer at our 168-acre Camp Guy located on the Whitewater River. Since 1957, the Club has been striving to equip young people with the skills they need to succeed in life. For more information, visit www.bgcrichmond.org.

Have Mild COVID-Like Symptoms? Reach Out to Your Primary Care Provider First

Posted January 31, 2022

Many of those experiencing mild symptoms consistent with COVID-19 are turning to Reid Health's Urgent Care locations or even the Emergency Departments. Instead, your first call should be to your primary care provider.

Anyone who has mild respiratory symptoms should reach out to their primary care provider's office. Staff there can help you get set up for COVID-19 testing -- if needed -- either at the office or at Reid's drive-thru testing sites. They also can schedule a telehealth visit for those who would rather not come to the office or direct you to the best place to seek care outside of the primary care provider's regular hours.

Reid also offers virtual urgent care through Reid Health NOW, which is priced at $29 through the end of February.

Recent surges in COVID-19 cases have pushed Reid Health's Urgent Care sites and Emergency Departments to their limits. It's critical that those who are experiencing only minor symptoms turn to their primary care provider first. If you have more serious symptoms such as shortness of breath or trouble breathing, that's when it's appropriate to visit the Emergency Department.

Using your primary care provider when your symptoms are mild can save you time. Most offices have same-day appointments available while seeing a provider at one of Reid's Urgent Care sites or the Emergency Departments could end up with you waiting to be seen because of a larger volume of other patients.

"Starting with the primary care doctor is more efficient and cost effective for the patient and it allows us to provide services more efficiently and effectively," said Thomas Huth, MD, Vice President of Medical Affairs for Reid Health. "Both are especially important when we find ourselves in an emergency regarding staffing and other resources, as we are today."

If you don't have a primary care provider, Reid Health can help you find one by calling (765) 935-8934.

Those with questions about COVID-19 can call the health system's COVID-19 Hotline at (765) 965-4200 seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Hotline staff can schedule testing, help you get your test results, and provide clinical advice.

If you don't have a primary care provider, Reid Health can help you find one by calling (765) 935-8934. If you would like to be vaccinated for COVID-19, Reid Health is giving out FREE primary doses and booster shots at Lingle Grand Hall on the lower level of Reid's main campus in Richmond. Hours there are 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays.

You don't have to schedule an appointment or pre-register. Walk-ins are welcome, and there are no long wait times.

For those who would like to make an appointment, Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule a time by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov. You may also call Reid's vaccine clinic directly at (765) 935-8484.

January 27th's COVID-19 stats

Patients in containment areas: 55

  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 40 (72.7%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 6
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 4 (66.7%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 4
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 2 (50%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 478
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 135 (28.2% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 23

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are FREE. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you need to be tested for COVID-19, Reid offers drive-thru testing at 1200 Chester Blvd. in Richmond and at 2025 Virginia Ave. in Connersville. Appointments are required at both sites. The Richmond location is open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily while the Connersville location runs 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. To schedule an appointment, call Reid's COVID-19 Hotline.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Highly Contagious Omicron Variant Means You Should Upgrade Your Mask

Posted January 18, 2022

Questions about which masks are best to wear have been with us since the COVID-19 pandemic's beginning, and many are still wearing the cloth masks that became popular when mandates were in place for public spaces.

But with the extremely contagious Omicron variant of the virus now in circulation, it's time to consider an upgrade.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has helpful information about the various kinds of masks and what amount of protection they offer against contracting COVID-19. Whatever type of mask you wear, it's crucial the mask fits well around your nose, mouth, and chin.

All those ages 2 and older who are not vaccinated or boosted should wear a mask in indoor public spaces. Even those who are up to date on their vaccines should wear a mask if they live in an area of substantial or high transmission, which includes the Reid Health service area.

Cloth masks offer the least amount of protection from the virus. Disposable surgical masks are better, and respirators such as KN95 or N95 masks perform the best when fitted properly for the wearer.

Surgical masks are required at all Reid Health facilities. Anyone who comes to Reid without one will have a surgical mask provided to them when they arrive.

"We encourage everyone to replace their cloth masks with disposable surgical masks instead," said Thomas Huth, MD, Vice President of Medical Affairs for Reid Health. "The ease with which Omicron spreads makes it critically important to wear a mask that will offer better protection than what cloth masks provide."

Although scarce in the pandemic's early days, KN95 and N95 respirators are easier to come by today. If you choose to wear one, they must be fitted to form a seal to your face for the maximum level of protection. Specially labeled "surgical" N95 respirators should be reserved for healthcare personnel, according to the CDC.

Masks are just one layer of protection needed to slow the spread of COVID-19. Vaccination remains the best tool we have for safeguarding ourselves, our loved ones, and everyone else we're around.

Reid Health is giving out primary doses and booster shots of the vaccines at Lingle Grand Hall on the lower level of Reid's main campus in Richmond. Hours there are 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays.

You don't have to schedule an appointment or pre-register. Walk-ins are welcome, and there are no long wait times.

For those who would like to make an appointment, Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule a time by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov. You may also call Reid's vaccine clinic directly at (765) 935-8484.

January 18th's COVID-19 Stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 42
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 29 (69%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 9
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 7 (77.8%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 5
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 4 (80%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 728
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 195 (26.8% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 24

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are FREE. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you need to be tested for COVID-19, Reid offers drive-thru testing at 1200 Chester Blvd. in Richmond and at 2025 Virginia Ave. in Connersville. Appointments are required at both sites. The Richmond location is open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily while the Connersville location runs 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. To schedule an appointment, call Reid's COVID-19 Hotline.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Reid Health Donation Will Allow Unused Building to Become a Hub for Social Services

Posted January 18, 2022

Social service agencies plan to turn an unused building in Connersville into a central access point for nutrition, housing, and other programs after Reid Health recently donated the facility to Interlocal Community Action Program Inc. (ICAP).

"We wanted to see the property used for services needed in the community. We felt ICAP would be able to successfully operate from the location, which will provide a central and convenient access point for those in need of services." -- Billie Kester, Reid Health Vice President of Continuum of Care

Reid came into possession of the building at 420 W. 24th St. when the health system assumed ownership of the former Fayette Regional Health System in 2019. The facility was vacant at the time, and it didn't fit Reid's needs.

"We wanted to see the property used for services needed in the community," said Billie Kester, Vice President of Continuum of Care for Reid Health. "We felt ICAP would be able to successfully operate from the location, which will provide a central and convenient access point for those in need of services."

Kevin Polivick, Executive Director of ICAP, said his agency is looking forward to opening the facility this spring.

"On behalf of the clients we serve in Fayette County, we want to thank Reid Health for this generous donation," Polivick said. "We plan to join with other social service agencies to develop a 'hub of services' that will include programs with a focus on nutrition, housing, employment, and training.

"We believe working together is key and with a high level of collaboration between our stakeholders, we can make substantial contributions to both the community and those we serve."

Advisory: Wayne County will be at a Level 2 Travel Watch effective 2/3/22 at 6:00AM

Posted February 2, 2022

Wayne County will be at a Level II Essential Travel Permitted- Snow Emergency (IDHS Watch). Effective 2/3/22 at 6:00 AM until further notice.

This classification may be declared when the Commissioners determine there is a significant threat to the operation of motor vehicles on county roads. County's roads are hazardous. Specified roadways or large sections of the county roads network are closed or impassable. Travel may be significantly delayed and motorists exposed to existing conditions may risk injury. As stated in the name, this emergency classification allows motorists to travel for essential purposes. The Ordinance defines essential travel as follows:

  • You may travel to and from work and school.
  • You may travel to a place of safe shelter.
  • You may travel to obtain essential medical care.
  • You may travel to obtain essential medications.
  • You may travel to obtain essential supplies of food or fuel.

Non-essential travel is prohibited. Examples of travel for non-essential purposes would be entertainment, recreation, or to obtain non-essential items.

Reid Health Welcomes Unexpected 4-Legged Guest After Fire

Posted January 17, 2022

Supplied Photo: Coco, the dog Whatever the circumstances that bring an individual to Reid Health, the team works hard around the clock to provide excellent care and ensure any needs are met.

Even if that individual isn't human.

An early morning house fire recently brought a surprise to the hospital in the form of a dog named Coco, a very good girl who suddenly needed a place to stay while her family recovered from their injuries.

As the patients were being treated, House Supervisor Vince Kennedy happened to overhear the EMS crew from the Richmond Fire Department wondering what to do with the dog they had in their ambulance, so Kennedy called Jeff Cook, Reid's Director of Engineering and Environmental Services, to see if Reid could help.

As it so happens, the health system's disaster plans include contingencies for sheltering employees' and patients' pets, so an animal crate was already available. Coco herself was no worse for wear after the fire.

"She was dragging me through the hallways," Kennedy said. "She just needed a good bath to get the soot and smoke smell off of her."

Cook asked a member of his team, Jon Norris, to get a crate ready and then make a special shopping trip so Coco would have everything she needed, a new collar and harness, a new leash, a bed for the crate, food from a local company ("Don't buy the cheap stuff and let's support the local economy," Cook told him), and more.

Cook's team is caring for Coco during the day while officers from the Reid Health Police Department make sure she has everything she needs through the night. Over the weekend, Officer Cory Jenkins brought Coco over to the hospital to visit with her family.

"She's really sweet and super friendly," Cook said. "We're going to make her a very spoiled pooch while she's here. It's just really cool to be able to help out this family in a time of need."

Omicron Variant Sends COVID-19 Positivity Rate Soaring

Posted January 17, 2022

Federal health officials have warned the Omicron variant of COVID-19 is highly contagious, more so than Delta or any other previous variant. Evidence of just how easily Omicron spreads can be found in the recent positivity rates for tests done at Reid Health.

Omicron was first detected in South Africa in November, made its way to the United States in the weeks that followed, and eventually was found in Indiana for the first time the weekend before Christmas.

That timeline is reflected in the positivity rates for COVID-19 tests performed by Reid for those months:

  • November: 11.1%
  • December: 16.4%
  • January: 30%

And the numbers continue to climb. This week alone, the positivity rate for tests conducted by Reid has been 39.9%.

Although evidence suggests Omicron is generally milder than the Delta variant, a portion of these cases will lead to hospitalizations at a time when health systems - including Reid Health - are already overwhelmed and in a state of emergency.

The ease with which Omicron spreads comes in part thanks to its ability to at least somewhat evade immunity brought on by a prior infection or the vaccines. Data has shown a booster dose of an mRNA vaccine such as Pfizer or Moderna greatly increases the vaccine's effectiveness against Omicron infection, going from about 35% to about 75%.

The vaccines continue to perform very well in protecting against severe illness, including hospitalization and death.

For that reason, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) strongly encourage COVID-19 vaccination for everyone 5 and older and booster shots for everyone 12 and older. The COVID-19 vaccines are safe, effective, and FREE.

Although the vaccines are the most important layer of protection, even if you're up to date on your shots, there are other things you should be doing to help reduce the spread of the virus:

  • Wear a well-fitting mask over your nose and mouth in indoor public settings and crowded outdoor areas,
  • Avoid crowds and poorly ventilated areas,
  • Stay at least six feet away from others,
  • Wash your hands frequently with soap and water,
  • Get tested if you have symptoms or have been exposed to someone with COVID-19, and
  • Stay home if you're sick.

Reid Health is giving out primary doses and booster shots of the vaccines at Lingle Grand Hall on the lower level ofReid's main campus in Richmond. Hours there are 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays.

You don't have to schedule an appointment or pre-register. Walk-ins are welcome, and there are no long wait times.

For those who would like to make an appointment, Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule a time by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov. You may also call Reid's vaccine clinic directly at (765) 935-8484.

January 14th's COVID-19 Stats

Patients in containment areas: 52

  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 37 (71.2%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 10
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 8 (80%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 9
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 7 (77.8%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 322
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 135 (41.9% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 25

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are FREE. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you need to be tested for COVID-19, Reid offers drive-thru testing at 1200 Chester Blvd. in Richmond and at 2025 Virginia Ave. in Connersville. Appointments are required at both sites. The Richmond location is open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily while the Connersville location runs 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. To schedule an appointment, call Reid's COVID-19 Hotline.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

IU East Establishes $850,000 Endowed Edwin Lewis Pike and Marilynn Craig Pike Scholarship

Posted January 13, 2022

Marilynn C. Pike is remembered as a dedicated teacher who valued education and her students. Now her love for both will continue through a newly established endowed scholarship for students at Indiana University East.

Pike passed away in August 2021, but not before setting up an $850,000 bequest to IU East to establish the endowed scholarship. Now finalized, the scholarship will honor the memory of Pike and her husband, Edwin Lewis Pike, and their support of education.

The Edwin Lewis Pike and Marilynn Craig Pike Scholarship will be awarded annually to one or more students pursuing a degree at IU East. Students may be enrolled in any academic program and must be residents of the state of Indiana in need of financial aid.

The Pike Scholarship recipient(s) will be selected by a committee beginning this spring for the fall 2022 academic year.

As an endowed scholarship, the Pike Scholarship it will generate approximately $38,000 in annual scholarship support.

According to the IU Foundation, an endowed gift is invested and a portion of the principal's earnings are used each year to support our mission. Endowments are created through gifts of cash, securities and other assets invested by the university. Typically, the principle of the endowment is untouched with awards made from a portion of the fund's earnings, generally around 4.5%.

IU East awards scholarships to incoming and current undergraduate students to assist with tuition costs, textbooks, fees, internships, research or creative projects, and travel opportunities.

Each year IU East awards over 70 scholarships in varying amounts to on campus and online students in each of its 50 academic programs.

Information needed to share on costs, percentage of student receiving aid each year, first-generation students receiving aid and any other needed information to share broadly. Each year, IU East students on average have less than $8,000 in tuition costs. During the 2020-21 academic year 71% of degree seeking students at IU East received some sort of financial aid.

Chancellor Kathy Girten said scholarships are extremely important for students to achieve their academic goals.

"We are so grateful for Marilynn's very generous gift endowing this new scholarship for students pursuing their degree at IU East," Girten said.

Marilynn C. Pike was born in Richmond and resident for most of her life. She graduated from New Castle High School before going on to earn her bachelor's degree in education from Indiana University. She then went on to Ball State University for her master's degree in counseling.

Pike taught English at Test Middle School in her native hometown for over 30 years.

An anonymous, close friend and the executor of Pike's trust said that she is dearly missed.

"She was one of those rare teachers who truly changed the lives of her students. Teaching was indeed a calling for her, not just a job. Past students often came to visit her - well into her 90s. She loved hearing about their lives now and the funny stories they would tell about things that happened while in her classroom. Marilynn and her husband were never blessed with children. She always said that this left her more time for her students. She was one of the most dignified, intelligent, caring and humble human beings that I have ever had the pleasure of knowing. I just thought you might enjoy knowing something about this remarkable (and generous) woman."

Girten added the scholarship shows the connection between the campus and the community.

"As an IU alumnus and an educator, Marilynn related to our campus and its mission to provide a high-quality education for students in Wayne County," Girten said. "A respected teacher and mentor in her profession, it is fitting that Marilynn would establish a gift that would continue to support her community long into the future by providing for countless students working toward their degree for years to come."

Todd Duke, interim vice chancellor for External Affairs, said Pike's passion for education is a legacy she will continue through planned giving.

"In the 30 years that Marilynn was a teacher, she prepared her lessons, planned for her students and what each day would bring, and worked to meet those goals. It was important to Marilynn to be the best educator she could be, and she valued a life of learning so much so that she wanted to see others meet their ambitions for a degree," Duke said. "Marilynn's foresight into continuing her passion for education and the legacy she built to care for others is evident through this gift."

Paula Kay King, director of Gift Development, said IU East works closely with individuals who wish to establish or contribute to scholarships in support of students.

"Our students appreciate the support they receive through scholarships. Without the support of these gifts, students may not get to experience all of the opportunities available to them and we wouldn't be able to continue to enhance our academic and extracurricular programs offered at IU East," King said. "Contributions from donors is extremely valuable to providing for our students on so many levels. We couldn't do this without the support of the community, and we are thankful for each gift."

For information on how to contribute, contact Paula Kay King, director of Gift Development, at (765) 973-8331 or pkayking@iue.edu.

Application Deadline for Teacher Scholarship and Stipends Approaching

Posted January 13, 2022

Students have until January 31 to apply for $7,500 scholarship and other teaching stipends

(INDIANAPOLIS) – Students in high school or college who are planning to teach or work in school administration in the State of Indiana have until January 31 to apply for one scholarship and two teaching stipends.

The Indiana Commission for Higher Education is encouraging students to act quickly, as there is limited funding available. All three financial aid opportunities can be applied for at ScholarTrack.IN.gov.

"Educators play a pivotal role in preparing students for higher education and the workforce," said Indiana Commissioner for Higher Education Teresa Lubbers. "The Commission is pleased to provide these financial aid opportunities to fund future educators' higher education and build Indiana's teacher pipeline."

Scholarship:

Next Generation Hoosier Educators Scholarship: The Next Generation Hoosier Educators Scholarship provides 200 high-achieving high school and college students interested in pursuing a career in education the opportunity to earn a renewable scholarship of up to $7,500 each year during up to four academic years. In exchange, students agree to teach for five years at an eligible Indiana school or repaythe corresponding, prorated amount of the scholarship. The Commission will review all applications and notify applicants of their scholarship status via email by March 18, 2022. For instructions on how to apply, and for a full list of eligibility requirements, visit learnmoreindiana.org/futureteacher.

Stipends:
  • Earline S. Rogers Student Teaching Stipend for Minorities: This stipend is available to minority students (defined as Black or Hispanic and Latino individuals) who plan to participate in student teaching or a school administration internship as part of their degree requirements during the semester they receive the stipend. The maximum amount a student may receive is up to $4,000. Priority will be given to student teaching applicants.
  • Student Teaching Stipend for High-Need Fields: The Student Teaching Stipend for High-Need Fields is available to students who plan to teach special education (any grade), middle school math, middle school science, high school math or high school science. The maximum amount a student may receive is up to $4,000.

For questions about state financial aid, students can contact the Indiana Commission for Higher Education by phone at 888-528-4719 or via email at awards@che.in.gov.

Why Does CDC Guidance Keep Changing? We're Learning More About COVID-19

Posted January 13, 2022

One constant throughout the COVID-19 pandemic has been the need to keep up with the latest safety guidelines issued by federal health officials. Although some of those remain unchanged -- advice to wear a mask, social distance, and wash your hands goes back to the beginning -- others have been tweaked over the past two years.

In the past few weeks alone, federal health officials have made several changes to guidance around booster shots (see here, here, and here) and isolation/quarantine timelines.

Although it can be frustrating trying to stay up to date with the latest news coming from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the shifting guidelines are a good sign: We're learning more about COVID-19 every day.

When the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19 first appeared, there were many questions about how easily it could be transmitted, how severe was the illness it caused, and how best we could fight back. Those answers eventually came, only for the virus to mutate multiple times, creating variants with their own set of questions.

Even when the first vaccines became available, we knew from trial studies they were effective against the virus, but we didn't know how long that effectiveness would last or how well the vaccines would hold up against whatever variants might come along.

Last fall, it became clear from studies and other data immunity from the vaccines had begun to wane for those who had been among the first to receive the shots. As a result, boosters were approved. Then came the highly transmissible Omicron variant with its ability to at least somewhat evade immunity created by the first vaccine doses. That led to the CDC moving up the timeline for booster shots.

As we learned more about how Omicron is spread and it became the dominant form of the virus, federal health officials realized the isolation and quarantine guidelines could change, so adjustments were made to those as well.

Yes, it can be frustrating trying to keep straight what's changed and what hasn't, but each new piece of information brings us that much closer to the end of the pandemic. For now, keep these measures in mind:

  • Get vaccinated,
  • If you're vaccinated, get boosted,
  • Wear a well-fitting mask over your nose and mouth in indoor public settings and crowded outdoor areas,
  • Avoid crowds and poorly ventilated areas,
  • Stay at least six feet away from others,
  • Wash your hands frequently with soap and water,
  • Get tested if you have symptoms or have been exposed to someone with COVID-19, and
  • Stay home if you're sick.

Reid Health is giving out primary doses and booster shots at Lingle Grand Hall on the lower level of Reid's main campus in Richmond. Hours there are 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays.

You don't have to schedule an appointment or pre-register. Walk-ins are welcome, and there are no long wait times.

For those who would like to make an appointment, Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule a time by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov. You may also call Reid's vaccine clinic directly at (765) 935-8484.

January 13th's COVID-19 Stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 58
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 39 (67.2%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 8
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 6 (75%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 8
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 6 (75%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 356
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 81 (22.8% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 36

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are FREE. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you need to be tested for COVID-19, Reid offers drive-thru testing at 1200 Chester Blvd. in Richmond and at 2025 Virginia Ave. in Connersville. Appointments are required at both sites. The Richmond location is open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily while the Connersville location runs 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. To schedule an appointment, call Reid's COVID-19 Hotline.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Singles Interaction, Inc.

Posted December 15, 2021, 2021

Supplied Newsletter: Singles Interaction January 2022

If you are 21 years of age or better and single, divorced, widow or widower, Singles' Interaction invites you to join them on Friday nights. Come to the Eagles Lodge, 75 South 12th Street, Richmond (membership not required) and meet other single people in the Richmond area.

Booster Timing for Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine Moved Up a Month

Posted January 10, 2022

Federal health officials have moved up the booster shot timing for Moderna's COVID-19 vaccine, bringing it in line with the Pfizer vaccine, which also uses mRNA technology to create an immune response to the virus.

Those who received either of the two-dose vaccines should now get a booster five months after their second dose. Previously, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) had recommended booster shots six months after the second dose.

For those who received the one-shot Johnson & Johnson vaccine, the guideline for getting a booster remains two months after their initial dose.

The change comes because of the rapid rise of the highly contagious Omicron variant, which has shown an ability to at least somewhat evade immunity brought about by a previous infection or the initial series of the vaccines.

Data has shown a booster dose of an mRNA vaccine such as Pfizer or Moderna greatly increases the vaccine's effectiveness against Omicron infection, going from about 35% to about 75%. The vaccines continue to perform very well in protecting against severe illness, including hospitalization and death.

Federal health officials strongly encourage COVID-19 vaccination for everyone 5 and older and booster shots for everyone 16 and older. The COVID-19 vaccines are safe, effective, and FREE.

Reid Health is giving out primary doses and booster at Lingle Grand Hall on the lower level of Reid's main campus in Richmond. Hours there are 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays.

You don't have to schedule an appointment or pre-register. Walk-ins are welcome, and there are no long wait times.

For those who would like to make an appointment, Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule a time by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.

January 10th's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 52
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 37 (71.2%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 10
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 7 (70%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 9
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 7 (77.8%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 1,088
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 244 (22.4% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 16

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are FREE. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you need to be tested for COVID-19, Reid offers drive-thru testing at 1200 Chester Blvd. in Richmond and at 2025 Virginia Ave. in Connersville. Appointments are required at both sites. The Richmond location is open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily while the Connersville location runs 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. To schedule an appointment, call Reid's COVID-19 Hotline.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Wayne County Area Chamber of Commerce, IU East and RAM Announce Postponements to Upcoming Events

Posted January 10, 2022

In consideration of the health and safety of the community and the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, the Wayne County Area Chamber of Commerce, Indiana University East and Richmond Art Museum (RAM) have mutually determined the best course of action is to postpone their respective upcoming public events, the Chamber Annual Dinner and Palate to Palette, until a later time.

The three organizations considered the size of the events, with regular attendance of hundreds of guests, and that the events are held in indoor venues. Additionally, Wayne County is experiencing a rise in coronavirus cases putting a strain on the health care system. With these considerations in mind, the boards and university determined the best course of action was to postpone the events.

This year's Wayne County Area Chamber of Commerce's Annual Dinner and Awards, themed "Wayneopoly," was originally scheduled for January 21. The Chamber recognizes businesses, organizations and individuals for their work and accomplishments during the dinner.

Palate to Palette is a collaborative fundraiser to benefit RAM programming and the IU East Department of Fine Arts. This year's event, "Under the Boardwalk," was scheduled for February 5. Individuals who have purchased tickets and sponsors with tickets for the event will be contacted soon.

While the events are postponed for now, IU East, RAM and the Chamber fully believe events such as these continue to be important for the community in order to raise funds, to show support and appreciation for area businesses and individuals for their dedicated efforts and accomplishments, to support the arts, and to foster close community connections.

Updates for Palate to Palette and the Chamber Annual Dinner will be shared at a later time. For updates regarding the Chamber Annual Dinner, visit WCAreaChamber.org/AD2022. For information on Palate to Palette, contact 765-973-8514 or pkayking@iue.edu.

Some COVID-19 Vaccinated People Are Getting Sick; That Doesn't Mean the Vaccines Don't Work

Posted January 10, 2022

On any given day, about 70-80% of the COVID-19 patients at Reid Health Hospital are not fully vaccinated. Some who are still skeptical of vaccination look at that number and perceive this as evidence the vaccines don't work.

"We thought the vaccines would prevent everyone from getting sick, so why are there vaccinated people in the hospital?" they ask.

There are several reasons why a small number -- about 3.7% in Indiana -- of those who have been vaccinated might still get sick.

They might have an underlying condition that compromises their immune system and prevents the vaccines from doing their best work such as cancer, a recent organ transplant, HIV, or even old age.

But the two primary reasons why some vaccinated people might now get infected with COVID-19 are waning immunity and a highly mutated variant of the virus, both of which we've known could pose problems since the vaccines were first administered more than a year ago.

The push to get vaccines in as many arms as fast as possible always was a race against time. How long immunity from the vaccines would last wasn't known at first, and the more the virus spread, the more likely it was that a trouble-causing variant would appear.

"The longer it takes to get people vaccinated, the higher the likelihood that one of these variants could catch hold or even a new one might pop up that the vaccines are less effective against," Thomas Huth, MD, Vice President of Medical Affairs for Reid Health said back in April 2021.

The good news is the vaccines still work. They remain highly effective in protecting against severe illness, including hospitalizations and death. Booster shots have proven to restore much of the vaccines' effectiveness in preventing infection from the virus, even from the Omicron variant.

And here we are. We've come to a time when many of those who were vaccinated last year have waning immunity while at the same time a new, highly contagious variant called Omicron has taken off thanks in part to its ability to at least somewhat evade immunity brought on by a prior infection or the vaccines.

The good news is the vaccines still work. They remain highly effective in protecting against severe illness, including hospitalizations and death. Booster shots have proven to restore much of the vaccines' effectiveness in preventing infection from the virus, even from the Omicron variant.

Vaccination is the best tool we have available to fight COVID-19, yet too many of us remain unvaccinated, creating the conditions in which we find ourselves today, with a state of emergency at Reid Health and other hospitals around the region.

FREE primary doses and booster shots of the COVID-19 vaccines are available at Lingle Grand Hall on the lower level of Reid's main campus in Richmond. Hours there are 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) now says everyone ages 12 and older should get a booster shot. At this time, only the two-shot Pfizer vaccine has been approved for those under the age of 18. Pfizer recipients should get their booster five months after their second dose.

Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.

January 7th's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 56
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 39 (69.6%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 10
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 8 (80%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 9
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 8 (88.9%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 264
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 101 (38.3% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 19

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are FREE. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you need to be tested for COVID-19, Reid offers drive-thru testing at 1200 Chester Blvd. in Richmond and at 2025 Virginia Ave. in Connersville. Appointments are required at both sites. The Richmond location is open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily while the Connersville location runs 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. To schedule an appointment, call Reid's COVID-19 Hotline.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Pfizer COVID-19 Vaccine Recipients Now Eligible for a Booster Shot a Month Earlier

Posted January 5, 2022

Those age 16 and older who receive the two-shot Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine now only need to wait 5 months after their primary doses before they can get a booster shot.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) this week updated recommendations for Pfizer boosters as well as for third doses for moderately or severely immunocompromised children.

Guidelines for booster shots of the vaccines from Moderna (6 months after the primary doses) and Johnson & Johnson (2 months after the initial dose) remain unchanged.

The CDC also now recommends moderately or severely immunocompromised kids ages 5-11 get a third primary dose of the vaccine 28 days after their second shot, lowering the age limit for third primary doses from the previous threshold of 12 years old. Only the Pfizer vaccine has been authorized for those under the age of 18.

Changes in the recommendations come as the highly contagious Omicron variant sweeps across the country -- thanks in part to its ability to at least somewhat evade immunity brought on by prior infections and vaccination -- creating new spikes in the number of infections

.

Data has shown a booster dose of an mRNA vaccine such as Pfizer or Moderna greatly increases the vaccine's effectiveness against Omicron infection, going from about 35% to about 75%. The vaccines continue to perform very well in protecting against severe illness, including hospitalization and death.

Federal health officials strongly encourage COVID-19 vaccination for everyone 5 and older and boosters for everyone 16 and older.

The COVID-19 vaccines are safe, effective, and FREE. Reid Health is giving out primary doses and booster shots at Lingle Grand Hall on the lower level of Reid's main campus in Richmond. Hours there are 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays.

Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.

January 5th's COVID-19 Stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 67
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 45 (67.2%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 13
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 10 (76.9%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 9
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 8 (88.9%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 253
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 102 (40.3% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 21

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are FREE. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you need to be tested for COVID-19, Reid offers drive-thru testing at 1200 Chester Blvd. in Richmond and at 2025 Virginia Ave. in Connersville. Appointments are required at both sites. The Richmond location is open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily while the Connersville location runs 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. To schedule an appointment, call Reid's COVID-19 Hotline.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Kids Ages 12-15 years Old Can Now Get COVID-19 Vaccine Booster Shots

Posted January 10, 2022

With the Omicron variant's ability to at least somewhat evade immunity created by prior COVID-19 infections and the vaccines, federal health officials have expanded booster shot eligibility to kids ages 12-15 years old.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) now says everyone ages 12 and older should get a booster shot. At this time, only the two-shot Pfizer vaccine has been approved for those under the age of 18. Pfizer recipients should get their booster five months after their second dose.

Data has shown a booster shot of an mRNA vaccine such as Pfizer or Moderna greatly increases the vaccine's effectiveness against Omicron infection, going from about 35% to about 75%. The vaccines continue to perform very well in protecting against severe illness, including hospitalization and death.

In making the decision to expand booster shot eligibility, the CDC reviewed available safety data from more than 25 million vaccine doses given to adolescents. That data showed the vaccines continue to be safe and effective.

Although COVID-19 infection has typically led to less serious illness in children than adults, they can still get sick -- sometimes severely or even deathly so -- and they can pass it along to others who might be more vulnerable to the virus such as older family members, caregivers, teachers and staff members at their schools, or even others their own age who might be immunocompromised or have other underlying health conditions.

Getting your child vaccinated not only protects themselves but also your family and all those who come into contact with your child.

FREE primary doses and booster shots of the COVID-19 vaccines are available at Lingle Grand Hall on the lower level of Reid's main campus in Richmond. Hours there are 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays.

Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov. Parents or legal guardians of minor children who will be vaccinated need to be present at the time of vaccination.

January 6th's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 62
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 44 (71%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 11
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 9 (81.8%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 8
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 7 (87.5%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 312
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 80 (25.6% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 18

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are FREE. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you need to be tested for COVID-19, Reid offers drive-thru testing at 1200 Chester Blvd. in Richmond and at 2025 Virginia Ave. in Connersville. Appointments are required at both sites. The Richmond location is open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily while the Connersville location runs 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. To schedule an appointment, call Reid's COVID-19 Hotline.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Even if Omicron Proves More Mild, High Rates of Infection Will Still Make Emergency Worse

Posted January 5, 2022

Since the Omicron variant of the virus that causes COVID-19 was first reported in November, there has been a push to discover as much about it as fast as possible, including how quickly it spreads and how severe it is compared to other variants.

Today, we know Omicron is very transmissible -- even more so than the highly contagious Delta variant -- thanks in part to its ability to at least somewhat evade immunity brought on by prior infections and vaccination.

The severity of the illness caused by Omicron remains under study, but even if it proves to be milder than the Delta variant, Omicron's ease of spread is still expected to create another spike in cases, some of which will lead to hospitalizations at a time when health systems -- including Reid Health -- are already overwhelmed and in a state of emergency thanks to the Delta variant.

The CDC says data from South Africa and the United Kingdom show vaccine effectiveness against Omicron infection for two doses of an mRNA vaccine -- Pfizer and Moderna -- is about 35%. A booster dose moves that effectiveness against infection up to about 75%, but the vaccines continue to perform very well in protecting against severe illness, including hospitalization and death.

Federal health officials strongly encourage COVID-19 vaccination for everyone 5 and older and boosters for everyone 16 and older.

Although the vaccines are the most important layer of protection, even if you're up to date on your shots, there are other things you should be doing to help reduce the spread of the virus:

  • Wear a well-fitting mask over your nose and mouth in indoor public settings and crowded outdoor areas,
  • Avoid crowds and poorly ventilated areas,
  • Stay at least six feet away from others,
  • Wash your hands frequently with soap and water,
  • Get tested if you have symptoms or have been exposed to someone with COVID-19, and
  • Stay home if you're sick.

The COVID-19 vaccines are safe, effective, and FREE. Reid Health is giving out primary doses and booster shots at Lingle Grand Hall on the lower level of Reid's main campus in Richmond. Hours there are 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays.

Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.

January 4th's COVID-19 Stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 71
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 49 (69%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 13
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 11 (84.6%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 9
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 8 (88.9%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 264
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 19 (7.2% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 25

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are FREE. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you need to be tested for COVID-19, Reid offers drive-thru testing at 1200 Chester Blvd. in Richmond and at 2025 Virginia Ave. in Connersville. Appointments are required at both sites. The Richmond location is open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily while the Connersville location runs 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. To schedule an appointment, call Reid's COVID-19 Hotline.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Reid Health EMS Expands Ambulance Service in Wayne County

Posted January 5, 2022

Supplied Photo: Reid Health AmbulanceReid Health's emergency ambulance service has expanded to include most of the Wayne County area.

In October, the Wayne County Board of Commissioners awarded Reid Health EMS a five-year contract to provide emergency ambulance service beginning in 2022 to all areas of the county with the exceptions of the City of Richmond and Wayne Township, which will continue to be served by the Richmond Fire Department.

"We're excited to continue to build upon our already-high-quality EMS program," said Ryan Williams, Director of EMS, Forensics, and Trauma Services for Reid Health. "We look forward to providing that same great level of care to Wayne County residents in these areas in the years ahead."

Reid began providing emergency ambulance services in 2019 when it was awarded the contract for southwestern Wayne County after the county's initial request for bids went without a provider for that area.

Reid Health EMS has since grown to include Union County, starting service there at the beginning of 2021.

"We're thrilled to be able to expand our service to more of the Wayne County area," said Misti Foust-Cofield, Vice President/Chief Nursing Officer for Reid Health. "It's our mission to lead our communities to well-being, one person at a time, and the growth of our EMS program is part of that."

As a result of the new contract with the county, Reid has worked with Culberson Ambulance Service to create a smooth transition for the northwestern Wayne County residents that Culberson had served for nearly 52 years. Owner Rick Culberson recently announced his retirement from the ambulance service.

"I want to thank Ryan Williams for all of his cooperation with this transition," Culberson said. "Whatever the replacement organization was going to be, I wanted to be sure it had the ability to demonstrate sustainability into the future. Reid has shown that."

"We're excited to continue to build upon our already-high-quality EMS program. We look forward to providing that same great level of care to Wayne County residents in these areas in the years ahead." -- Ryan Williams, Director of EMS, Forensics, and Trauma Services for Reid Health

Reid has an ambulance stationed at the former Culberson location in Hagerstown and has hired some of the Culberson crew members as part of the transition.

"The service Rick Culberson and his staff have provided deserves recognition by everyone in the community," Williams said. "There is no better way a person can serve their neighbors than by assisting them in their greatest time of need and with the pride and commitment shown by Culberson Ambulance Service for more than 50 years."

In the eastern part of the county, Reid takes over for Red Line EMS, which plans to continue to provide education in the area through EMT and Advanced EMT classes.

"We thank Red Line for their years of service and plan to continue working with and supporting them in the future," Williams said. "They have been and will continue to be an important piece of the first responder community."

Patients transported by Reid EMS do not have to be taken to Reid Health Hospital for care. Patients can request to be transported to a nearby hospital of their choice, provided their choice is suitable for the level of care they require.

All Reid EMS ambulances are staffed 24/7 with a paramedic-level crew of at least one paramedic and one EMT. In Wayne County, Reid ambulances are stationed in Cambridge City, Hagerstown, and Richmond.

Monoclonal Antibody Treatment Clinic Moving to Former Elder-Beerman Building

Posted January 3, 2022

Reid Health's COVID-19 monoclonal antibody treatment clinic will move this week from its current location on Richmond's west side to the former Elder-Beerman building downtown.

Monoclonal antibodies are a treatment designed to help your immune system fight viruses. The U.S. Food & Drug Administration has given Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) for their use in adults and children who are at least 12 years of age, who weigh at least 88 pounds, and who are at high risk for severe COVID-19.

Beginning Wednesday, Reid will give the infusions at the former Elder-Beerman building at 601 E. Main St. The move was made necessary when sewer issues were discovered recently at the Reid Plaza site. Those issues do not affect Reid's PACE Center or any of the tenants occupying other suites at the plaza.

Those needing monoclonal antibody treatment will enter the former Elder-Beerman building on its south side next to the parking lot. Patients should call (765) 993-5496 when they arrive before entering.

For those who qualify, monoclonal antibodies can be used to treat mild to moderate symptoms of COVID-19. Treatment can be provided up to 10 days after the onset of symptoms, but it's most effective when administered within no more than four days.

Under the EUA, being high risk means meeting at least one of the following criteria:

  • Being at least 65 years old
  • Having a body mass index (BMI) of at least 35
  • Being pregnant
  • Having chronic kidney disease
  • Having diabetes
  • Having an immunosuppressive disease
  • Currently receiving an immunosuppressive treatment
  • Having cardiovascular disease or hypertension
  • Having chronic lung diseases
  • Having sickle cell disease
  • Having neurodevelopmental disorders or conditions that require ongoing specialized care
  • Having a medical-related technological dependence (for example, tracheostomy, gastrostomy, or positive pressure ventilation)

If you meet the criteria for a monoclonal antibody infusion, don't wait until you feel poorly to talk with your physician. Once you qualify for hospital admission, you no longer meet the requirements for monoclonal antibody treatment.

Patients need a physician's referral to get an appointment for treatment. If you do not have a primary care provider or it's the weekend, call Reid's COVID-19 Hotline at (765) 965-4200 for help. The hotline is available 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a week.

Hotline staff also can help with scheduling COVID-19 testing, getting test results, or with clinical advice.

January 3rd's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 67
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 47 (70.1%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 14
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 13 (92.9%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 8
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 8 (100%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 805
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 249 (30.9% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 17

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are FREE. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you need to be tested for COVID-19, Reid offers drive-thru testing at 1200 Chester Blvd. in Richmond and at 2025 Virginia Ave. in Connersville. Appointments are required at both sites. The Richmond location is open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily while the Connersville location runs 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. To schedule an appointment, call Reid's COVID-19 Hotline.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Paysleigh Makes It Through COVID to Arrive as Reid's First Baby of 2022

Posted January 3, 2022

For Valerie Scalf, her second pregnancy went much different than her first nine years ago. There's the COVID-19 pandemic to thank for that.

Scalf caught the virus in her second trimester. Fever, chills, and body aches led to congestion and coughing. It was about a week and a half before she finally tested negative for COVID.

"I had a doctor's appointment every week with a stress test and an ultrasound on top of it," the Richmond resident said.

Thankfully, Scalf made it through the illness OK, eventually leading to the birth of her daughter, Paysleigh, in time to be Reid Health's first baby of 2022.

Paysleigh was born at 7:32 p.m. on New Year's Day after about eight hours of labor. When Scalf first arrived at the hospital, she wasn't anticipating having a baby that same day.

"I came in because I thought I had a UTI or something, but it was really labor. I didn't have anything wrong," she laughed.

"After they told me I was going to have a baby, they told me I was going to have the first if I did it right. I was like, 'Alright, here we go.'"

When it came time to begin pushing, Paysleigh made her arrival quickly.

"Three pushes and she was out," dad Zachary Bennett said.

"She was making her entrance," Scalf said.

Paysleigh was born at 19 inches long, weighing 6 pounds and 10.3 ounces.

Community Generates Over $1.86 Million in 2021 Challenge Match

Posted January 3, 2022

The Wayne County Foundation is pleased to announce the results of the 2021 Challenge Match. Over the nine-day match period between November 1-9, 2021, forty local nonprofit organizations collectively raised over $1.6 million from their generous donors. This amount, plus the Foundation matching funds, represents over $1.86 million in total contributed to benefit the community. All of the funds raised during this program go directly to the organization's operating costs.

The Challenge Match was an opportunity for participating organizations to share up to $275,000 in matching funds from the Foundation, based on qualifying gifts they received from the community in the designated match period. 2021 represented the tenth consecutive year the program was offered, and also one of the largest amounts raised in program history.

'The Challenge Match was first implemented in 2012 as a means to assist our local nonprofits raise critical operating dollars and to enhance the spirit of charitable giving in our community,' said Rebecca Gilliam, Wayne County Foundation Executive Director. 'Over the past decade, we feel like we have accomplished these goals. As a Foundation, we remain in awe of the generosity of the program's donors - they help make all of this possible.'

The program also featured several match partners, including David and Carla Stidham, Doxpop Charitable Giving Fund, First Bank Community Fund, Fund for Tomorrow, and the Second Chance Fund.

'We would like to thank our match partners for giving so generously,' Gilliam said. 'Also, our participating organizations did a wonderful job of effectively spreading their respective missions to galvanize their donors once again.'

Auxiliary Makes Record Donation to Reid Health Foundation

Posted January 3, 2022

Despite the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, the Reid Health Auxiliary continues to make record donations to the Reid Health Foundation.

The latest came this month when the auxiliary's board members presented Randy Kirk, Reid Health Vice President/President of Reid Health Foundation, with a check for $370,000, which was $45,000 more than last year's record-setting total.

"I couldn't be more pleased. It's the most joyous thing I've done in 2021," said John Herig, president of the auxiliary board. "I can't think of anything better than being able to present our foundation with what is an exceptional donation considering the circumstances."

The auxiliary raises money year-round with special sales and through the hospital's gift shop, the Ginkgo Boutique, which is wholly owned and operated by the auxiliary. All proceeds from the gift shop and other activities are presented to the foundation annually.

"The impact of the work of this auxiliary and of Gingko Boutique is off the charts. There is no peer in the country for what you are giving," Kirk said. "For all the programs you'll support this year and the purchases of equipment and the impact in multiple service areas -- on behalf of all those patients in the future who are beneficiaries of what you have done -- thank you."

"I couldn't be more pleased. It's the most joyous thing I've done in 2021. I can't think of anything better than being able to present our foundation with what is an exceptional donation considering the circumstances." -- John Herig, President of the Reid Health Auxiliary Board

Since its formation in 1948, the auxiliary has now given more than $4.56 million to the foundation. The money is used to support patient care at Reid Health, including technology and equipment needs. Past donations have funded items such as the green roof installed over a portion of the main campus, the grand piano in the atrium, pediatric therapy equipment, chemotherapy chairs, and defibrillators.

The auxiliary's officers for 2022 will include Herig as president, Electa Berk as president-elect, David Garman as past president, Virginia Thompson as treasurer, Pat Shuck as assistant treasurer, John Reddington as recording secretary, Becky Russell as assistant recording secretary, and Patsy Goble as corresponding secretary.

Auxiliary volunteers donate their time across Reid Health with some 200 active in various departments.

For information about volunteering at Reid, visit reidhealth.org/volunteer-opportunities.

Logans Reign Supreme in Service and Giving; Scholarship Endowed

Posted January 3, 2022

Supplied Photo: Jerry and Terri Logan
Dr. Jerry Logan and Terri Logan established an endowed scholarship to benefit fine arts at IU East.

Jerry Logan is the Supreme Court justice of Indiana University alumni.

So say those who've known him as a perpetual booster and board member for about 50 years.

Of course, the honorary title is not because he hands down judicial rulings.

It's because he has garnered so much respect through decades of continuous service on local and statewide alumni boards.

It's because he is a hands-on, tireless worker who is laser-focused on helping more students get into the Indiana University system -- whether it's at Bloomington, IU East or any IU campus.

It's because he and his wife, Terri, give so generously to help students in optometry and the arts, fields that they studied at IU Bloomington and then turned into highly successful careers.

In fact, they recently endowed the Jerry & Terri Logan Fine Art Scholarship at IU East with gifts totaling $50,000.

The scholarship is designed to help more IU East students to achieve success -- and also to lead the way to more gifts. "We hope that our scholarship will entice others to either join our scholarship or start one of their own in fine arts," Jerry Logan said.

"We both feel that we owe IU a lot and want to give back. We are excited about the opportunity to introduce students to art in hopes that some will decide to make it their career," he added.

Terri agrees: "It's the perfect place to help, to give back to the community and artists ... make the journey a little easier and more likely," she said.

The scholarship for undergraduates in fine arts is the first for IU East, King believes.

"Their goal is to truly make an impact for fine arts students at IU East. Each year, they look forward to meeting with the scholarship recipient to hear how their classes are going," King said. "This gives the scholarship recipient the opportunity to learn more about the Logans and why they created the scholarship. It also gives the student a chance to thank them for their generosity. We are grateful for the support the Logans provide our students at IU East."

The Logans both lived in Winchester and knew each other during their high school years, but she was most often away at a college-prep school. They connected during a fateful summer event after her senior year. "We danced one dance and that was it," she said about the beginning of their 55-year partnership in life.

They settled in Richmond, where they raised two children, Ryan and Greg. She worked in psychotherapy for nearly two decades, often blending art forms into her treatment, before turning her attention to creating unique pieces of jewelry as a full-time artist.

Jerry Logan opened his optometrical practice in 1969 and soon started serving on IU alumni boards.

His involvement with IU East reaches back to the mid-1960s when he took a class during a summer break. Classes then were held at Earlham College -- and IU East didn't officially become a regional site of the Indiana University system until 1971.

"I've seen it go from one building to five," he boasts. "It's been very enjoyable to see how that has benefited the community."

It's also given him great joy to serve in every role on alumni boards.

He can't remember the last year he didn't serve as secretary of a local board. "They think I am kind of a Supreme Court justice," he jokes. "I have been secretary forever."

The supreme designation certainly has its merits, said Terry Wiesehan, director of Alumni and Campus Ceremonies at IU East. Everyone else serves two- and three-year terms, but, "He doesn't rotate off," Wiesehan said. "He is amazing."

His office-holding reaches into service clubs, too, such as the Kiwanis and Jaycees. "After so many years being so involved, I kind of take it for granted," Terri Logan said. "He's a lovely, generous man."

Logan's role now with the regional alumni board involves compiling minutes after meetings and sending out the next agenda to members.

IU East recently merged its alumni chapters that serve the campus and Eastern Central Indiana, renaming the board to the East Region Chapter of the IU Alumni Association.

Logan also has served on IU's optometry board in every major role.

He has served several terms on the executive council of the IU Alumni Association and also been on the IU Optometry Dean's Advisory Council. He is a recipient of the 2018 IU School of Optometry Foley House Basement Key Award, presented to an alumnus/a who has demonstrated exceptional dedication and/or service to the school. In honor of his service to the School of Optometry, he was awarded an IU Bicentennial Medal in 2020. The bicentennial medals were awarded to organizations and individuals who, through their personal, professional, artistic, or philanthropic efforts, broadened the reach of IU around the state, nation, and world.

In 2013, the Logans were included into the Presidents Circle which honors Indiana University's most generous donors. Many of these men and women have helped define the very character of IU. Lifetime membership is offered to individuals and households that have irrevocably transferred assets to Indiana University.

Perpetuity and leadership are important to the Logans.

"My wife and I feel strongly about the importance of education. Having her degree in art, we wanted to encourage (students) to explore the possibilities," Jerry Logan said.

They want to help IU East in part because it is a school of possibilities for so many people in Richmond and the surrounding area, he said. "It's offered education to a lot who wouldn't have had that opportunity."

The Logans also have endowed a similar scholarship for aspiring optometrists at the IU School of Optometry.

Jerry Logan is grateful about what his IU degrees have meant professionally -- and personally.

"It just changed my whole life. I met friends, grew as a person," he said. "I have loved my profession and helping people. IU made that possible."

Jerry and Terri Logan still spend a lot of time in Bloomington, where they own half of a duplex.

They enjoy the large variety of restaurants, concerts and activities there. They are longtime season-ticket holders for Hoosiers basketball and football.

Both are winding down their careers.

"Until COVID hit, I was working full time," Jerry Logan said.

Drs. Logan & Bailey Optometrists was forced to close for a while and he then started working three days a week after it reopened.

"I still enjoy what I do," Jerry Logan said. "It's worked out well."

Terri Logan is a nationally recognized jewelry artist who semi-retired two years ago. "I quit doing shows and stayed with a handful of galleries (that display and sell her works)," she said. "I make what I want ... It's all my choice, my time, when I want to make it."

She is the owner of Terri Logan Studios. She has received many awards and prestigious gallery placements, including regular representation in the annual SOFA exhibitions.

Previously, she also served as a member of the Art Advisory Committee at IU East and as a member of the Whitewater Valley Chapter of the Alumni Association.

The Logans also encourage others to give when they can.

"We ask you to support fine arts by considering making a gift to the scholarship fund we have created," Jerry Logan said.

For information on how to contribute, contact Paula Kay King, director of Gift Development, at (765) 973-8331 or pkayking@iue.edu.

History Repeats as Reid Provides Jacy House With 2nd Building

Posted January 3, 2022

Some 18 years ago, Reid Health was able to help a local nonprofit in need, allowing JACY House to move into an unused building close to Chester Boulevard in Richmond. This year, Reid again has come to the group's aid, making a second, nearby building available so JACY House could expand.

A ribbon-cutting ceremony recently took place for the renovated facility at 1400 Chester Blvd., the former office of James Parliament, MD, and now the main building for JACY House.

Also known as the Justice and Advocacy Center for Youth, JACY House provides a safe, child-friendly atmosphere where specially trained staff can conduct forensic interviews in cases of alleged child abuse. The organization also provides prevention programs in local schools.

"We're so grateful for the amazing things that our new building can offer our staff and the families we serve," said Amanda Wilson, Executive Director of JACY House. "Our new family room provides families with comfortable seating, a play area for children, and their own bathroom so they're secure and their confidentiality is well protected.

"We're so grateful for the amazing things that our new building can offer our staff and the families we serve. Our new family room provides families with comfortable seating, a play area for children, and their own bathroom so they're secure and their confidentiality is well protected." -- Amanda Wilson, Executive Director of JACY House

"As this is a trying time for non-offending caregivers and their children, we strive to give them an environment that is warm and friendly to ease some nerves and fears as best we can."

Since 2003, Reid has provided the facility at 2 Quaker Hill Drive to the organization, maintaining the site and paying for utilities at no cost to JACY House. The same arrangement now is in place for the building at 1400 Chester Blvd.

Reid Community Benefit also has given grant funding to JACY House to help with prevention programs, a total of $54,625 over the past five years alone.

"This is wonderful organization, and we are pleased to provide support because they are working every day to reduce adverse childhood experiences and impact trauma in our communities," said Angela Cline, Director of Community Benefit.

Work to renovate the 1400 Chester Blvd. facility was donated by Shook Construction, Cummins Electric, Beard Masonry, Reynolds Plumbing, and others.

LifeStream Services is Recognized for Vaccination Rate

Posted January 3, 2022

LifeStream Services has been recognized as a Bronze COVID Stops Here workplace for achieving a 70% vaccination rate. The COVID Stops Here campaign recognizes Indiana workplaces that have achieved widespread vaccination against COVID-19. Organizations that have achieved at least a 70% vaccination are eligible to receive a designation.

It is critical that Hoosiers work together to stop the spread of coronavirus – including the dangerous new Delta and Omicron variants. Vaccination is the best way to stop COVID-19.

"Our employees recognize that they work with an at-risk population and know that the vaccine is the best way to protect both our clients and ourselves," said DeDe Davis, HR/Benefit Officer at LifeStream Services.

The Indiana Chamber of Commerce and Wellness Council of Indiana are promoting the COVID Stops Here campaign as a way to celebrate workplaces that are leading the fight to stop COVID-19 – and to encourage more organizations to join their ranks.

"It's become clear that the COVID-19 vaccine is Indiana's best pathway to recovery," said Indiana Chamber President and CEO Kevin Brinegar. "Employers have an essential role to play and we're pleased to recognize those organizations making it a priority for the betterment of all."

Learn more about the COVID Stops Here campaign at indianachamber.com/stopcovid.

Singles Interaction, Inc.

Posted December 15, 2021, 2021

Supplied Newsletter: Singles Interaction January 2022

If you are 21 years of age or better and single, divorced, widow or widower, Singles' Interaction invites you to join them on Friday nights. Come to the Eagles Lodge, 75 South 12th Street, Richmond (membership not required) and meet other single people in the Richmond area.

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Did You Know?

John Finley, Richmond, Indiana mayor from 1852 until his death in 1866, wrote the poem "The Hoosier's Nest", which is often cited as the first written reference to the word "Hoosier".