News Releases

Wayne County Foundation Announces 2022 Lilly Endowment Community Scholars

Posted December 15, 2021, 2021

The Wayne County Foundation is pleased to announce the selection of two area high school seniors who will receive the prestigious Lilly Endowment Community Scholarship.

From a highly competitive pool of seventy-nine applicants, Emily Cox of Lincoln High School and Garrett Walther of Centerville High School were chosen as Wayne County's 2022 Lilly Endowment Community Scholars. Each Lilly Endowment Community Scholarship provides for full tuition, required fees, and a special allocation of up to $900 for required books and equipment for four years of undergraduate study on a full-time basis leading to a baccalaureate degree at any eligible Indiana public or private nonprofit college or university.

'We are so proud of these students and admire their accomplishments both inside and outside of the classroom,' said Foundation Executive Director Rebecca Gilliam. 'Emily and Garrett represent the very best of Wayne County and have positively impacted their communities. We are thrilled to bestow this honor upon them.'

Emily is a senior at Lincoln High School. By the end of her junior year, she had compiled a 4.30 grade point average. Some of her extracurricular activities include Fellowship of Christian Athletes, Key Club, Business Professionals of America, National Honors Society, as well as participating on Lincoln's volleyball and tennis teams. Emily describes herself as a 'passionate and goal-oriented' individual. She plans to attend Indiana Wesleyan University to study nursing.

Garrett is a senior at Centerville High School. By the end of his junior year, he carried a 4.01 grade point average. During his time at Centerville, he has participated in Eastern Indiana Model Legislature, Fellowship of Christian Athletes, Indiana Junior Beef Cattle Association, 4-H, National Honors Society, and track and field. Since he was little, Garrett 'lives and breathes his family farm in every instant'. He plans to attend Purdue University to study agricultural economics.

The primary purposes of the Lilly Endowment Community Scholarship Program are to help raise the level of educational attainment in Indiana, to increase awareness of the beneficial roles Indiana community foundations can play in their communities, and to encourage and support the efforts of current and past Lilly Endowment Community Scholars to engage with each other and with Indiana business, governmental, educational, nonprofit and civic leaders to improve the quality of life in Indiana generally and in local communities throughout the state.

Since the Lilly Endowment created the program during the 1998-1999 school year, fifty-three students have been awarded Lilly Endowment Community Scholarships through the Wayne County Foundation.

Ivy Tech Community College Names McCollum as Richmond Campus Chancellor

Posted December 15, 2021, 2021

Ivy Tech Community College Ivy Tech Community College has named Dr. Walter McCollum, a United States Air Force veteran, as the Richmond chancellor. He will assume his duties on January 31, 2022.

A Fulbright Scholar, McCollum, recently served as Vice President/Senior Associate Vice Provost for Miami Dade College Online. He has both higher education and workforce experience, having administered in higher education for over 15 years at community colleges, four-year institutions, and online universities as well as serving in top multinational corporations as a senior leader in change management, organizational development, quality management, and process improvement.

"Dr. McCollum is a strong leader and proven innovator," Ivy Tech President Sue Ellspermann said. "I fully expect he will 'hit the ground running' and work closely with K-12, employer, higher education and community leaders to ensure Ivy Tech is meeting the needs of the Richmond service area."

"I am delighted to join the Richmond campus and contribute to economic development, social mobility, and long-term viability of the service area and state," Dr. McCollum said. "I look forward to partnering with the community on the quest to ensure students have the skills and competencies to be competitive in securing high-wage jobs."

Prior to his corporate experience, Dr. McCollum served in Desert Storm both abroad and stateside with specialties in Information Management and Communication.

As chancellor, McCollum will oversee day-to-day Richmond operations as well as the service area that covers Fayette, Randolph, Rush, Union, and Wayne counties, including the College's location in Connersville.

He holds an Associate of Applied Sciences degree in Business Management from Dabney S. Lancaster Community College; a Bachelor of Science Degree in Liberal Arts/Psychology from The University of the State of New York SUNY Albany; a Master of Arts Degree in Management from Webster University; and a Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), in Applied Management and Decision Sciences with a specialization in Leadership and Organizational Change from Walden University. He has written seven books and is published in peer-reviewed journals. His doctoral research was "Process Improvement in Quality Management Systems: Case Study Analyzing Carnegie Mellon's Capability Maturity Model"

As Vice President/Senior Associate Vice Provost for Miami Dade College Online, he had oversight of strategic visioning and fiscal responsibility for Student Services, Academic Services, Technology Services, Course Design, Development and Delivery, Faculty Recruitment, Hiring and Development. He was responsible for the overall leadership, management, development and distribution of online education programs and courses for over 15,000 students and support of eight campuses and nearly 100,000 students. Under his leadership, MDC Online increased enrollment by over 24 percent during the pandemic.

As Dean of Student Affairs at Walden University, Dr. McCollum had oversight of Student Conduct, Military Services, Disability Services, Alumni Affairs, Student Activities/Student Organizations, OMBUDS, and Student Counseling Services for 50,000 students and 140,000 alumni. His leadership yielded the result of many "firsts". In 2017, he spearheaded the establishment of a groundbreaking Divine Nine Alliance (DNA), the first online Black Greek Letter student alliance in higher education, where all the divine nine Black fraternities and sororities collaborated to support the institution's mission on positive social change. In 2018, he established a partnership with The National Society of Leadership and Success (NSLS), the largest leadership organization in the United States, and increased membership by 13,000 within three months of chapter launch. In 2019, he spearheaded the establishment of the first digital Fulbright Chapter in the 42-year history of Fulbright, providing broader national and international access for Fulbright scholars to connect minds and hearts for global change.

As a professor of 15 years, Dr. McCollum has taught at many institutions at all degree levels and served on over 100 dissertation committees across multiple disciplines to include, but not limited to, business, psychology, education, public policy, management, and leadership. His book "How to Use Emotional Intelligence, Cultural Intelligence, and Spiritual Intelligence to Mentor Doctoral Learners: Best Practices and Tools to Help Mentors and Doctoral Learners Navigate the Dissertation Process" was reviewed by Kansas State University and the review was published in the Adult Learning Journal.

Dr. McCollum is passionate about impacting positive social change globally. As a Fulbright Scholar, he recently completed a Fulbright grant with the Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research in Amman Jordan, to evaluate the selection and evaluation processes for hiring university presidents in public universities in Jordan and make recommendations for the academic congressional mandate for hiring university presidents in the Kingdom of Jordan. He has led delegations to South Africa, Costa Rica, and Haiti to work on issues related to poverty, gender-equality, and education. In 2018, Dr. McCollum built a primary school in Haiti through the Walter McCollum Education Foundation (with 208 students in the inaugural class/50 percent boys and 50 percent girls) to improve literacy and gender inequality.

Additionally, McCollum is a peer evaluator with the Higher Learning Commission and Middle States Commission on Higher Education. He has served on the board of directors for the National Society for Leadership and Success, Fulbright Association – National Capital Area Chapter, Organizational Development Network, and Community for Creative Non-violence. He is a fellow of the Association of Governing Boards Institute for Leadership and Governance in Higher Education and a graduate of the Penn State Academic Leadership Academy.

Singles Interaction, Inc.

Posted December 15, 2021, 2021

Supplied Newsletter: Singles Interaction January 2022

If you are 21 years of age or better and single, divorced, widow or widower, Singles' Interaction invites you to join them on Friday nights. Come to the Eagles Lodge, 75 South 12th Street, Richmond (membership not required) and meet other single people in the Richmond area.

We Continue to Run the COVID-19 Pandemic Marathon

Posted December 15, 2021, 2021

It's called "hitting the wall." It's the time in a marathon for many runners when the body begins to shut down from accumulated stress and the mind screams, "ENOUGH! JUST STOP ALREADY!"

You're about 20 miles in with another 6 or so to go. So close to the end yet still so far.

A pandemic is a marathon. Many of us have hit that wall and we're ready to just be done with it all.

We've lost track of the number of waves that have come and gone. We're tired of learning the Greek alphabet by way of new variant names.

We know what's waiting for us at the finish line. It's life the way it used to be. But we're not there yet.

So close to the end yet still so far.

We could give in, drop our masks, refuse to get a life-saving vaccine or booster shot, and hope when the virus comes for us, we're one of the lucky ones who get off easy.

But you can't finish the race if you can't breathe, and right now, our healthcare workers are exhausted and the number of COVID patients in our hospitals has created an emergency situation.

Now isn't the time to listen to the voice in your head telling you it's not worth it anymore. Now is the time to refocus and rededicate yourself to safety measures -- get vaccinated, get boosted if you're eligible, and regardless of your vaccination status, wear a mask when out in public, maintain social distancing, wash your hands frequently, and stay home if you don't feel well.

These things are now more important than ever, given the emergency we find ourselves in. But we can still reach the finish line, we just need everyone to do their part to get there.

December 15th's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 70
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 56 (80%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 17
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 16 (94.1%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 10
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 10 (100%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 201
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 36 (17.9% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 14

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Transition from Security Team to Police Department Complete

Posted December 15, 2021, 2021

Supplied Photo: Reid Administrators and Police Department

A transformation that began nearly two years ago came to a completion recently with the graduation of three Reid Health Police Department officers from the Indiana Law Enforcement Academy.

Supplied Photo: New Reid Health Police Department OfficersIn early 2020, Reid began to transition its security team to a police department, joining other health systems around the state. The move is intended to enhance the security and safety of Reid Health team members, patients, and visitors.

Last week, Cody Hahn, Cody Frame, and Troy McCauley became the final officers of the department to earn their academy certification.

"When we began this process, we thought it could take two to three years to finish and yet here we are with the transition done ahead of schedule," said Randy Kolentus, Reid's Chief of Police. "We're grateful for all of the work put in by the team to get to this point so quickly."

Last week also saw the addition of two new officers to the department in Matt Reed and Lorenzo Shepler, both of whom are already academy certified.

"We're incredibly proud of the outstanding law enforcement officers who make up the Reid Health Police Department," said Pamela Jones, Vice President/General Counsel for Reid Health. "Their dedication to serving our community -- especially during these challenging times -- is exceptional."

"When we began this process, we thought it could take two to three years to finish and yet here we are with the transition done ahead of schedule. We're grateful for all of the work put in by the team to get to this point so quickly." -- Randy Kolentus, Reid Health Chief of Police

The change from a security team to a police department reflects Reid's growth and the accompanying increase in the need for police assistance. When the intention to establish the department first was announced, Kolentus noted the Richmond Police Department responded to Reid calls almost 900 times in 2019.

Becoming a police force will result in increased training and certifications for Reid's officers in Richmond and Connersville. It also provides them arrest authority, allowing them to deal more effectively with potentially violent incidents.

The former Security Department has grown from nine officers in 2016 to more than 20 team members today as Reid's geographic footprint has increased and its number of staff has risen to some 3,600 people.

LifeStream Launches New Website!

Posted December 15, 2021, 2021

Supplied Image: Lifestream Web Capture

LifeStream Services, East Central Indiana's Aging and Disability Resource Center, is proud to announce the launch of its new website. The site offers a fresh look that better reflects the new LifeStream brand and visual identity announced in March 2021. Additionally, the website features new content and accessibility features to enhance the user experience.

"It has been several years since our website has undergone a redesign, so it was perfect timing to continue our work with Intersection after our rebrand to start working on a new website," explained Hannah Dunckel, Marketing Manager at LifeStream Services. "We hope visitors to the site will find the new look welcoming and will be able to access the information they need easily and efficiently."

LifeStream's new website was developed through a collaborative effort with Intersection. A notable new feature of the site invites visitors to unique pages with information on programs and services available to those who identify as an older adult, caregiver, or service provider. These new pages were designed specifically for the people that LifeStream serves so they can easily access the information that is most relevant to them.

"The LifeStream and Intersection teams worked hand in hand to revitalize both the content and the organization of the site," shared Megan Carrell, Designer at Intersection. "There was an emphasis on using elements that would inject life and movement into the visual design of the site, including color waves and organic shapes, as well as photography focusing on the people behind the programs. We wanted this very robust website to feel friendly and easy to navigate, which included making it usable for all generations of visitors, on all devices."

Other key features of the site include an accessibility feature to help those with visual impairments navigate the website, a live chat to speak directly to a LifeStream representative, and the ability to sort news/stories to specific topics of interest. LifeStream encourages the community to visit and explore its new website.

VISIT LIFESTREAM'S WEBSITE: https://lifestreaminc.org/

Managing Current COVID-19 Surge Is About More Than Just Adding Beds

Posted December 15, 2021, 2021

The current wave of COVID-19 cases that has caused an emergency situation for Reid Health is stretching resources in ways previous surges haven't before.

COVID-19 cases are overwhelming capacity, leaving few to no resources for other medical needs. Hospitals that Reid normally would work with to ensure patient placement are not accepting patients because they either don't have rooms for them or not enough staff to care for them.

As a result, Reid has had to keep patients in the Emergency Departments in Richmond and Connersville for a time until an inpatient room for them at Reid or another facility can be found.

But the solution isn't just to add more rooms at the hospital or another location. Patients with severe COVID-19 illness need more than just a bed. They need a high level of care from staff with higher certifications and training. Those staff are at their limit in the number of patients for which they can properly provide care.

"This isn't so much about physical capacity. We have spaces in our buildings where we can float people over. We do have an overflow area open in one section of the hospital that we're able to staff. We have others we could leverage. But the problem is that we don't have the staff," said Thomas Huth, MD, Vice President of Medical Affairs for Reid Health.

"The problem we have is there's just way too much demand for the capacity that we have."

The number of patients requiring acute care has doubled during this surge, which has doubled the need for staff in high-acuity areas of the hospital, creating the shortage.

Staffing levels at Reid have not been affected by any vaccine mandate. Reid has not implemented its own mandate that team members get vaccinated, and the health system paused its efforts to enforce a federal mandate once that rule was stayed by a federal court ruling.

Patients with severe COVID-19 illness need more than just a bed. They need a high level of care from staff with higher certifications and training. Those staff are at their limit in the number of patients for which they can properly provide care.

It's imperative everyone take all measures to prevent further spread. That means getting vaccinated if you haven't already. If you have been vaccinated, get a booster shot if you're eligible.

Regardless of vaccination status, everyone should go back to wearing masks while in public places, observe social distancing, be sure to frequently wash their hands, and stay home if they aren't feeling well. Every layer of protection we add makes it that much harder for the virus to spread.

December 14th's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 73
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 56 (76.7%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 16
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 16 (100%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 11
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 11 (100%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 271
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 24 (8.9% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 28

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Severity of Illness Makes This COVID-19 Emergency Worse Than a Year Ago

Posted December 13, 2021, 2021

A year ago, patients in containment areas at Reid Health Hospital climbed over 100 as a surge of COVID-19 cases stretched the health system's resources. Today, the number of confirmed COVID patients in the hospital is not yet that high, but circumstances are more dire than before.

The highly contagious and more severe Delta variant -- which was not around a year ago -- is causing the current surge that began in late July. The average hospital stay for patients in this wave has been much longer than usual because of the severity of the illness, which means available resources such as beds and staffing are not turning over as quickly as they have in the past. This has caused Reid Health and other hospitals in our region to reach their limits in their ability to care for new patients suffering from COVID or other health issues.

The Delta-variant surge looks different than earlier waves of the pandemic. Previously, patients tended to be older people with underlying health conditions, in other words, the most vulnerable among us. Today, the sickest patients usually are younger (between the ages of 35 and 65), are overweight or obese, are diabetic, and most importantly, the vast majority are unvaccinated.

Although the peak for patients in containment areas topped 100 early last December, many of those turned out not to be positive. During those early days, test results were processed by outside labs, leading to more patients staying in containment areas while waiting on an official diagnosis. Today, Reid's COVID-19 testing is able to be done in-house, leading to quicker results to determine the best course of care.

The current spike in local hospitalizations reached a peak in mid-September with a pandemic-high 87 confirmed-positive patients at the hospital. In the weeks that followed, that number dropped, eventually reaching a low of 19 early last month. But in the time since, hospitalizations have quickly risen again -- to 69 patients as of today -- following the Thanksgiving holiday.

The average hospital stay for patients in this wave has been much longer than usual because of the severity of the illness, which means available resources such as beds and staffing are not turning over as quickly as they have in the past. This has caused Reid Health and other hospitals in our region to reach their limits in their ability to care for new patients suffering from COVID or other health issues.

Sadly, deaths at the hospital are also climbing. It took 18 months of the pandemic to surpass 200 COVID-19 deaths at Reid. In the three months since, another 100 have died.

It's imperative everyone do their part and take all measures to prevent further spread. That means getting vaccinated if you haven't already. If you have been vaccinated, get a booster shot if you're eligible.

Regardless of vaccination status, everyone should go back to wearing masks while in public places, observe social distancing, and be sure to frequently wash their hands. Every layer of protection we add makes it that much harder for the virus to spread.

December 13th's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 69
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 56 (81.2%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 15
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 15 (100%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 11
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 11 (100%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 644
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 83 (12.9% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 23

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Student Works Shine for Annual National Day on Writing with 150 Submissions

Posted December 13, 2021, 2021

Supplied Image: Kelly Blewett teaches English 270 Argumentative Writing in Whitewater Hall. Blewett's students submitted contributions for this year's National Day of Writing held in October.
Kelly Blewett teaches English 270 Argumentative Writing in Whitewater Hall. Blewett's students submitted contributions for this year's National Day of Writing held in October.

We all write more than we think we do.

That's a mantra for Kelly Blewett with her students at Indiana University East. Blewett is an assistant professor of English in the School of Humanities and Social Sciences.

Emails and essays. Instant messages and resumes. Scholarship and financial-aid applications. Tweets, blog posts and personal journals. They all are forms of everyday writing.

"You are asked to write all the time in college. People do it in daily life, no matter their backgrounds," Blewett said. "I enjoy helping students see the role writing is already playing in their lives."

People write to express thoughts and to get out what's in their heads, of course, but they also write to articulate what they want, what they feel, what matters to them, where they want to go in life.

Those reasons-and more-are certainly why about 150 students submitted their efforts for the National Day of Writing that was held on October 20 at IU East.

Delaney Hayes, a criminal justice major, prepares before class with Assistant Professor of English Kelly Blewett. She and her classmates are in the last week of classes and final exams at IU East.
Delaney Hayes, a criminal justice major, prepares before class with Assistant Professor of English Kelly Blewett. She and her classmates are in the last week of classes and final exams at IU East.

Blewett organizes the event in which 109 submissions were publicly displayed on IU East's Twitter site and on the 13-foot wide and 7.5-foot tall First Bank Richmond Tech Zone and IQ Wall in the Whitewater Hall Lobby. Student writings published on Twitter can be found with the hashtags #writing&processing, #writing&connection, #writing&resilience or #redwolveswrite. She said many of the students had photos taken next to their submissions when they showed up on the large display of tiled flat-screen monitors.

Entries were sought from students and the community on the prompt: How did writing help them survive 2020?

Writing can help people take some control of their lives when they are under stress, Blewett said. "There were so many touching stories," she added.

She notes the following one that stood out to her: A nurse or aide wrote about feeling overwhelmed and depleted (by the pandemic's effects). But, then she received a poem of appreciation that touched her. She carries that now in her pocket to hold onto the words, Blewett said.

Education major Faith Mansfield, who is from Greenville, Ohio, wrote in her submission: Without writing, I can feel overwhelmed with all the information inside my head, but when I can write, I can express my thoughts and feelings. It is a relief to develop my thoughts onto paper.

Blewett was thrilled by the quality of the entries. "I always get excited when any students think about writing," Blewett said.

She practices what she preaches. "I write all kinds of things. It helps me stay focused. Scholarly writing is a big part of my life," she said.

Brooke Lepper, an education major from Decatur, Indiana, responds to a class discussion.
Brooke Lepper, an education major from Decatur, Indiana, responds to a class discussion.

Mansfield is a math lover who made her submission on a bit of a whim. "My professor talked highly about it," Mansfield said.

Volleyball player and psychology major Brooke Lepper said, "For me writing is a way of getting away from my hectic schedule between school, work and volleyball. Loving to write, for me, is connected to my ability to slow down and be in my own world with just my thoughts. I am getting to communicate on my paper or screen." Lepper is from Decatur, Indiana.

Jamie Andrews, an exploratory major from Fountain City, Indiana, and one of this year's Lingle Scholars, wrote a submission. She wrote: Writing helps when I am faced with life's challenges because it allows an escape that helps sort the thoughts.

The pandemic-and its wide-ranging effects-was used as a prompt to get students thinking about the role it played in writing. "This year has been more difficult than most," Blewett said.

A primary goal, Blewett said, was to show how writing can help connect students, help them heal and help them move forward. "We wanted to get people thinking about the role of writing specifically during the pandemic."

The worldwide breakout of the deadly COVID-19 closed the campus originally for a couple weeks and then the time stretched into another year and a half. Everything changed about campus life and everyday life. Students spent more time alone in their thoughts and in their homes. They connected with instructors and fellow students via Zoom, rather than going to classes on campus. They faced a myriad of obstacles to overcome.

Supplied Photo: Jalanie Ruth
Jalanie Ruth, a double-major in accounting and business administration from Ridgeville, is one of the students to participate in the National Day of Writing. Each year the event inspires students and individuals to write more, and to think about why they write. This year IU East contributed its most submissions to date - along with participation from undergraduate and graduate students, faculty and staff - with a writing prompt focused on the COVID-19 pandemic.

Lepper touched on the effects in her submission: Writing has been one of the biggest ways to keep myself grounded during the pandemic. By writing about the events I have gone through in a journal, I can remind myself of the struggles I have overcome and find the ability to keep going forward.

Mansfield found a positive: "Being at home more has helped me with writing. I find it easier to write at home where it is peaceful."

Andrews found stress relief. "A lot was going on, so writing allowed for a lot of escapes, if need be, from the reality of the world and pandemic around us."

Lepper added that the pandemic made her a lot "more grateful to be able to go to school and learn. Before the pandemic, I was really interested in mental-health awareness, but now I think I am really interested in how we have all been effected. This is a big motivation for me in all of my writing."

The day-long event tied in with a Mindful Explorations Series presentation held the next day on campus. Byron McCauley and Jennifer Mooney, co-authors of Hope, Interrupted: America Lost and Found in Letters, offered a reading and Q&A. Their presentation was designed to "showcase how two engaged citizens used writing as a tool to connect, to deepen their relationship, to make sense of a difficult time, and, overall, to enhance their resilience." McCauley and Mooney also visited Blewett's argumentative writing class, where they interacted with Lepper, Andrews, and Mansfield.

Their presentation was designed to "showcase how two engaged citizens used writing as a tool to connect, to deepen their relationship, to make sense of a difficult time, and, overall, to enhance their resilience."

Lepper found inspiration in her argumentative writing class. "I wrote about mentally ill persons in the criminal justice system and their needs that are many times not met," Lepper said.

She has found her first year at IU East to be inspiring in other ways. "Being from a small town, I love meeting new people of different backgrounds and I have really been able to do that here between my peers and professors. This has translated into my writing in the way of taking my writing to another level of understanding different cultures and other backgrounds and how that can affect people and their writing as well."

Andrews said instructors are good at pushing her and other students to work on their writing. "I was inspired to do the Day of Writing because I love to hear what others have to say about why they write and I wanted to be one that others could look at to hopefully inspire them as well."

The National Day of Writing was started by the National Council of Teachers of English with a goal of bringing communities together. IU East has participated in activities since 2013.

Blewett said students have other outlets to share their writing at IU East.

Those include the Celebration of Student Writing held every April. Students can contribute personal writings or assignments submitted for classes (in person or online). Teachers can even nominate student works. There is also the Student Research Day in which students can submit their research and creative projects to present.

Submissions are also sought for Tributaries, IU East's student journal that has been in existence since 1980.

Blewett hopes to see more submissions. "It may be a safe way to dip their toes in a public presence as a writer," Blewett said.

Surge in COVID-19 Cases Has Reid Health in Emergency Situation

Posted December 13, 2021, 2021

The latest surge in the COVID-19 pandemic has hospitals throughout our multi-state region with no room for more patients, not enough high-acuity staff to care for patients, or both.

Area health systems are being overrun with COVID-19 cases, leaving few to no resources for other medical needs. This is an EMERGENCY situation and requires everyone in our communities to do their part to reduce the spread of the virus.

Hospitals that Reid Health normally would work with to ensure patient placement are not accepting patients because they either don't have rooms for them or not enough staff to care for them.

As a result, Reid is boarding patients in the Emergency Departments in Richmond and Connersville as staff work to find suitable places for them elsewhere.

This new surge is likely fallout from Thanksgiving and other holiday-related gatherings, which brings concerns about Christmas parties going on now and over the coming weeks as well as New Year's celebrations.

It's imperative everyone take all measures to prevent further spread. That means getting vaccinated if you haven't already. If you have been vaccinated, get a booster shot if you're eligible.

Regardless of vaccination status, everyone should go back to wearing masks while in public places, observe social distancing, and be sure to frequently wash their hands. Every layer of protection we add makes it that much harder for the virus to spread.

We need to do these things to save lives and preserve the health and safety of our most vulnerable citizens who are having difficulty getting access to inpatient care.

This is an emergency, and it will require each of us doing everything we can to bring this situation to an end.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are FREE. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you need to be tested for COVID-19, Reid offers drive-thru testing at 1200 Chester Blvd. in Richmond. Appointments are required and are available from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily. To schedule an appointment, call Reid's COVID-19 Hotline.
  • Those with risk factors for severe COVID-19 illness might qualify for an infusion of monoclonal antibodies, a treatment designed to help your immune system fight viruses. The infusion works best when given within a few days of the start of symptoms and can be given regardless of whether you've been vaccinated. For more information, call Reid's COVID-19 Hotline.
  • The COVID-19 Hotline staff can assist with scheduling a test, receiving test results, and seeking clinical advice. The hotline is open seven days a week by calling (765) 965-4200. Hours are 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

COVID-19 Vaccine Booster Shots Now Available for 16-17-year-Olds

Posted December 13, 2021, 2021

Federal health officials have expanded eligibility for COVID-19 vaccine booster shots to teens ages 16-17 who originally received the Pfizer version of the vaccine.

Both the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have signed off on the move. The CDC says everyone 18 years and older should get a booster shot, regardless of which vaccine they originally received.

As scientists continue to study the latest COVID-19 variant, Omicron, the CDC recommends everyone who is eligible either get vaccinated or get a booster shot because of the vaccines' strong protection against severe illness, hospitalization, and death.

Here's the latest on who qualifies for booster shots and when they should be administered:

Pfizer

  • Who can get a booster: Everyone who is at least 16 years old
  • Who should get a booster: Adults 18 years and older
  • When to get a booster: At least six months after your second shot
  • Which booster can you get: Teens ages 16-17 are only eligible to get a Pfizer booster. Those who are older may get any of the COVID-19 vaccines.

Moderna

  • Who should get a booster: Adults 18 years and older
  • When to get a booster: At least six months after your second shot
  • Which booster can you get: Any of the COVID-19 vaccines

Johnson & Johnson

  • Who should get a booster: Adults 18 years and older
  • When to get a booster: At least two months after your second shot
  • Which booster can you get: Any of the COVID-19 vaccines

Reid Health now has given out more than 5,000 vaccine booster shots. FREE primary doses and booster shots of all three vaccines are available at Lingle Grand Hall in the lower level of Reid's main campus in Richmond. Hours there are 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays.

Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.

December 10th's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 60
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 49 (81.7%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 16
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 16 (100%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 14
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 14 (100%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 212
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 41 (19.3% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 36

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Reid Community Benefit Honored by Boys & Girls Clubs Indiana Area Council

Posted December 13, 2021, 2021

Supplied Photo: Reid Community Benefit received the Community Service Award from the Boys & Girls Clubs Indiana Area CouncilReid Community Benefit has received the Community Service Award from the Boys & Girls Clubs Indiana Area Council for Reid's support of the organization's local programming.

Over the past three years alone, Reid Community Benefit has given nearly $74,000 in grants to the Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County for the Prevention Plus and ClubFit programs.

"Reid Community Benefit has been such a blessing to the Boys & Girls Club! Their partnership and continued support have allowed our organization to continue to build programming that keeps our kids healthy and active," said Sarah Roddy, Director of Resource Development for Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County.

"As anyone with children knows, it is hard to get them away from screens and to be physically active, but with the grants provided by Reid Community Benefit, we have kids who are ready every day to run and play with their friends."

ClubFit encourages kids to develop healthy eating habits and be active through a variety of activities while Prevention Plus provides evidence-based substance use prevention programming at the Boys & Girls Clubs facilities and at schools.

"We are honored to receive this award, and it's extra special to know we were nominated by our local Boys & Girls Clubs partner," said Angela Cline, Director of Reid Community Benefit.

"The Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County has been a strong ally for us in combatting some of the most difficult health challenges in our area. We look forward to continuing our partnership to promote health in our communities."

Elective Inpatient Surgeries Paused Once Again as COVID-19 Cases Rise

Posted December 13, 2021, 2021

With COVID-19 cases once again on the rise at the hospital, Reid Health has paused all elective inpatient surgeries.

The health system made a similar decision in early September as COVID-19 cases were quickly climbing thanks to the highly contagious Delta variant. That wave peaked later in the month, and the number of hospitalized patients dropped over the following weeks, eventually reaching a low of 19 in early November.

Now, hospitalizations are rapidly increasing again.

Emergent/urgent surgeries will proceed as normal, as will outpatient surgeries scheduled at Reid Outpatient Surgery & Endoscopy (ROSE).

All scheduled surgeries will be reviewed for urgency, and the surgeon's office will reach out to those patients who need to be rescheduled.

The move will allow clinical staff to be available for other inpatient needs as Reid remains on critical bed status.

All those who are still unvaccinated are strongly encouraged to get the shot. Those who have received one of the vaccines but who are now eligible for a booster dose -- anyone 18 years and older who is two months past receiving the one-dose Johnson & Johnson vaccine or six months past receiving the second of the two-dose Pfizer or Moderna vaccines -- also should get their extra shot.

"Along with getting vaccinated and booster shots, it's important everyone -- vaccinated or not -- get back to using masks and maintaining social distancing when out in public places," said Thomas Huth, MD, Vice President of Medical Affairs for Reid Health.

"Doing all these things together will give us the best chance at reducing spread in the face of this latest wave."

Indiana residents can schedule a FREE vaccination or booster dose at ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents can use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.

"Along with getting vaccinated and booster shots, it's important everyone -- vaccinated or not -- get back to using masks and maintaining social distancing when out in public places. Doing all these things together will give us the best chance at reducing spread in the face of this latest wave." -- Thomas Huth, MD, Vice President of Medical Affairs

December 8th's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 53
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 46 (86.8%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 12
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 12 (100%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 11
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 11 (100%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 363
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 51 (14% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 17

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Ivy Tech Community College Names Finalists for Richmond Chancellor Post

Posted December 6, 2021, 2021

College invites public to community sessions on December 8 and 9

Ivy Tech Community College has named finalists for the Richmond chancellor post – Sarah Cleveland and Dr. Walter McCollum. Both candidates bring a wealth of knowledge of higher education and experience. The College will hold community forums for each of the finalists to enable members of the public to meet finalists and ask questions.

The forums will be located on the Ivy Tech Richmond campus in Stidham Auditorium at 10 a.m. on December 8 for Dr. McCollum and at 10 a.m. on December 9 for Ms. Cleveland. For more information about the process or to attend, please contact Christy Opal, Ivy Tech Human Resources, at copal@ivytech.edu.

Cleveland is the Assistant Vice President of Enrollment Strategy for Ivy Tech Community College. As part of the statewide recruitment, enrollment and marketing team, Sarah has coached and educated 19 campuses and their cabinets on strategic enrollment planning strategies, which includes specific focus on consistent and intentional use of the IvyConnect (Salesforce) Customer Relationship Management (CRM) tool, and enrollment strategies aligned with K-14 and the Career Coaching and Employer Connections team. Sarah also manages the statewide international student services team.

Sarah started at Ivy Tech in 2013 as a Project Manager for the Ivy Institute of Technology where she developed a communication plan focused on workforce, which was a new strategy at the time for the College, and a model that has been the foundation for other programs since then. She has had additional roles including Assistant Director of Marketing, Recruitment and Web, and Executive Director of Marketing and Enrollment Services.

Prior to Ivy Tech, Sarah was an Employment and Training Team Leader for the IU Health/Homeless Initiative Program in Indianapolis. She also did consulting work for the ECHO Housing Corporation. Most notably, she provided technical direction to launch the Department of Labor Homeless Veterans Employment which allowed ECHO Housing to serve homeless veterans, and to assist them with finding and retaining employment.

Sarah has a Music Education degree from Ball State University (Muncie, Indiana) and at the start of her career, served as an elementary music teacher for Fort Wayne Community Schools and Wabash City Schools. She then earned her Master of Public Affairs in Public Administration from Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis (Indianapolis, Indiana), which launched her career in consulting and higher education.

Sarah is a graduate of Simplex Level 1 and 2, the creative problem-solving methodology used by Ivy Tech statewide. She is also a graduate of Ivy Tech's Leadership Institute and served as a Strategic Rotation Lead, where she implemented and facilitated for strategy teams across the state as it relates to the College's Strategic Plan.

Sarah lives in Greenfield, Indiana with her husband, Jeff, and their two daughters, Anna and Olivia.

Dr. Walter McCollum, who was a Fulbright Scholar, recently served as Vice President/Senior Associate Vice Provost for Miami Dade College Online. He is a fellow of the Association of Governing Boards Institute for Leadership and Governance in Higher Education and a graduate of the Penn State Academic Leadership Academy. He has worked in higher education for over 15 years at community colleges, four-year institutions, and online universities. He worked for top multinational corporations as a senior leader in change management, organizational development, quality management, and process improvement. Prior to his corporate experience, Dr. McCollum served in the United States Air Force (Desert Storm Veteran) both abroad and stateside in Information Management and Communication specialties.

As Vice President/Senior Associate Vice Provost for Miami Dade College Online, he had oversight of strategic visioning and fiscal responsibility for Student Services, Academic Services, Technology Services, Course Design, Development and Delivery, Faculty Recruitment, Hiring and Development. He was responsible for the overall leadership, management, development and distribution of online education programs and courses for over 15,000 students and support of eight campuses and over 100,000 students. Under his leadership, MDC Online increased enrollment by over 24 percent during the pandemic.

As Dean of Student Affairs at Walden University, Dr. McCollum had oversight of Student Conduct, Military Services, Disability Services, Alumni Affairs, Student Activities/Student Organizations, OMBUDS, and Student Counseling Services for 50,000 students and 140,000 alumni. His leadership yielded the result of many "firsts". In 2017, he spearheaded the establishment of a groundbreaking Divine Nine Alliance (DNA), the first online Black Greek Letter student alliance in higher education, where all the divine nine Black fraternities and sororities collaborated to support the institution's mission on positive social change. In 2018, he established a partnership with The National Society of Leadership and Success (NSLS), the largest leadership organization in the United States, and increased membership by 13,000 within three months of chapter launch. In 2019, he spearheaded the establishment of the first digital Fulbright Chapter in the 42-year history of Fulbright, providing broader national and international access for Fulbright scholars to connect minds and hearts for global change.

As a professor of 15 years, Dr. McCollum has taught at many institutions at all degree levels and served on over 100 dissertation committees across multiple disciplines to include, but not limited to, business, psychology, education, public policy, management, and leadership. His book "How to Use Emotional Intelligence, Cultural Intelligence and Spiritual Intelligence to Mentor Doctoral Learners: Best Practices and Tools to Help Mentors and Doctoral Learners Navigate the Dissertation Process" was reviewed by Kansas State University and the review was published in the Adult Learning Journal.

Dr. McCollum is passionate about impacting positive social change globally. As a Fulbright Scholar, he recently completed a Fulbright grant with the Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research in Amman Jordan, to evaluate the selection and evaluation processes for hiring university presidents in public universities in Jordan and make recommendations for the academic congressional mandate for hiring university presidents in the Kingdom of Jordan. He has led delegations to South Africa, Costa Rica, and Haiti to work on issues related to poverty, gender-equality and education. In 2018, Dr. McCollum built a primary school in Haiti through the Walter McCollum Education Foundation (with 208 students in the inaugural class/50 percent boys and 50 percent girls) to improve literacy and gender inequality.

He holds an Associate of Applied Sciences degree in Business Management from Dabney S. Lancaster Community College; a Bachelor of Science Degree in Liberal Arts/Psychology from The University of the State of New York SUNY Albany; a Master of Arts Degree in Management from Webster University; and a Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), in Applied Management and Decision Sciences with a specialization in Leadership and Organizational Change from Walden University. He has written seven books and is published in peer reviewed journals. His doctoral research was "Process Improvement in Quality Management Systems: Case Study Analyzing Carnegie Mellon's Capability Maturity Model"

Dr. McCollum is a peer evaluator with the Higher Learning Commission and Middle States Commission on Higher Education. He has served on the board of directors for the National Society for Leadership and Success, Fulbright Association – National Capital Area Chapter, Organizational Development Network, and Community for Creative Non-violence.

COVID-19 Patient Levels Climbing Once Again at Reid Health Hospital

Posted December 6, 2021, 2021

Patient levels at Reid Health Hospital remain elevated as COVID-19 cases are on the rise once again.

Although a new COVID-19 variant -- now known as Omicron -- is causing concern about the pandemic's future, the Delta variant is still the dominant strain in local circulation.

Highly contagious Delta fueled a spike in local hospitalizations that began in late-July after case numbers had stayed in the single digits for much of the summer. The wave peaked about two months later with a pandemic-high 87 confirmed-positive patients at the hospital on Sept. 22.

In the weeks that followed, the number of COVID-19 patients at the hospital dropped, eventually reaching a low of 19 on Nov. 5. But in the time since, hospitalizations have crept back up -- to 41 patients as of today -- keeping the hospital on "critical" bed status and indicating another surge in cases could be beginning.

As has been the case throughout the Delta-fueled wave, the vast majority of those severely ill from the virus have been unvaccinated. Severe breakthrough cases among the vaccinated have typically been among older patients with significant other health issues who had not received a booster shot or third dose of the vaccines.

FREE vaccinations remain available to anyone 5 years and older at Lingle Grand Hall on the lower level of the hospital in Richmond. Hours are 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays. All three vaccines are available at the site.

Anyone 18 and older also can get a booster shot at the same location provided it has been either six months (for Pfizer and Moderna recipients) or two months (for Johnson & Johnson recipients) since their initial dose.

Appointments can be made by going to ourshot.in.gov.

Hospitalizations have crept back up -- to 41 patients as of today -- keeping the hospital on "critical" bed status and indicating another surge in cases could be beginning.

December 2nd's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 41
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 35 (85.4%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 8
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 6 (75%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 3
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 2 (66.7%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 419
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 70 (16.7% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 26

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

See, Sip and Sow

Posted December 2, 2021, 2021

Supplied Flyer:   See, Sip & Sow by Townsend Center

Townsend Community Center, Inc. invites you to SEE our new facitily, SIP on your favorite beverage and SOW a seed on Friday, Decmeber 17th from 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. at the new location, 300 North 10th Street, Richmond, IN 47374. Learn more at townsendcommunitycenter.org.

INDOT Reminds Public to Reinforce Mailboxes Before Winter Weather Arrives

Posted December 2, 2021, 2021

The Indiana Department of Transportation is urging residents along state roads and U.S. highways to prepare their mailboxes prior to the start of winter weather.

Snow and ice removal is INDOT's top priority during winter months. While the agency's yellow plow trucks generally travel slower than the posted speed limit and drivers are careful to avoid mailboxes, the weight of snow thrown from plows can cause damage to mailboxes that are not properly secured or have weak supports.

Property owners are responsible for installing and maintaining mailboxes on state right of way. To mitigate possible damage, INDOT recommends placing a mailbox as far from the edge of the roadway as a mail carrier can reach.

By placing a mailbox as far from the edge of the roadway as a mail carrier can reach and mounting the mailbox on a sturdy support, it should withstand the force of snow thrown from a plow.

Clearing snow from the access area near a mailbox can ensure safer delivery of mail and reduce the amount of snow coming off a plow.

Below are tips to help reduce the risk of mailbox damage:

  • Place a six-to-eight-inch piece of reflective tape on the mailbox to help it be seen at night.
  • Remove snow from around your mailbox, but avoid throwing snow back onto the roadway.
  • Inspect your mailbox. Make sure it is firmly supported in the ground and make sure it is securely mounted to the post. Check for deteriorated/rusted posts and/or mounts.
  • Avoid plastic mailboxes if possible. Some tend to shatter in cold temperatures.
  • If your mailbox is continually damaged or knocked down, consider changing the location, even if just by a few feet.

Supplied Graphic:  Where to Place Your Mailbox to Winter Protect It

COVID-19 Patient Levels Climbing Once Again at Reid Health Hospital

Posted December 2, 2021, 2021

Patient levels at Reid Health Hospital remain elevated as COVID-19 cases are on the rise once again.

Although a new COVID-19 variant -- now known as Omicron -- is causing concern about the pandemic's future, the Delta variant is still the dominant strain in local circulation.

Highly contagious Delta fueled a spike in local hospitalizations that began in late-July after case numbers had stayed in the single digits for much of the summer. The wave peaked about two months later with a pandemic-high 87 confirmed-positive patients at the hospital on Sept. 22.

In the weeks that followed, the number of COVID-19 patients at the hospital dropped, eventually reaching a low of 19 on Nov. 5. But in the time since, hospitalizations have crept back up -- to 41 patients as of today -- keeping the hospital on "critical" bed status and indicating another surge in cases could be beginning.

As has been the case throughout the Delta-fueled wave, the vast majority of those severely ill from the virus have been unvaccinated. Severe breakthrough cases among the vaccinated have typically been among older patients with significant other health issues who had not received a booster shot or third dose of the vaccines.

FREE vaccinations remain available to anyone 5 years and older at Lingle Grand Hall on the lower level of the hospital in Richmond. Hours are 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays. All three vaccines are available at the site.

Anyone 18 and older also can get a booster shot at the same location provided it has been either six months (for Pfizer and Moderna recipients) or two months (for Johnson & Johnson recipients) since their initial dose.

Appointments can be made by going to ourshot.in.gov.

Hospitalizations have crept back up -- to 41 patients as of today -- keeping the hospital on "critical" bed status and indicating another surge in cases could be beginning.

December 2nd's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 41
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 35 (85.4%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 8
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 6 (75%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 3
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 2 (66.7%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 419
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 70 (16.7% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 26

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Iu East's Five Herbert Presidential Scholars Have Touching Stories

Posted December 2, 2021, 2021

The similarities are striking in the touching stories of five freshmen who stand tall as this year's Herbert Presidential Scholars at Indiana University East.

They all covet the small class sizes and the close interaction with instructors and fellow students.

They all cherish staying closer to home and helping family - and avoiding debt, too.

They all were surprised and honored by the awards. They all are grateful and have great potential for success in their fields.

And their personal stories are powerful:

Jonathan Hardwick of New Castle received a big boost from his mother in considering and choosing to apply to IU East. Then tragedy struck and the award became even more essential. "It's been a miracle," Hardwick said. "I figured I could get some help, but I didn't expect a full ride. It's amazing."

Ariana Hernandez of Richmond is a first-generation college student who knew she needed to stay close to home for financial and family purposes. "I knew since middle school I was going there. ... I am the first of my immediate family to go to college," Hernandez said. "I knew I had to be the first."

Kasey Johnson of Centerville is following in her mother's footsteps as a student at IU East. Her parents waited in the car as awards were given on Scholarship Day. "I'll never forget the moment I got handed my folder and realized that I was selected," she recalls. "Chancellor (Kathy) Girten came over to introduce herself to me and personally congratulate me. I remember thinking, 'Wow. This is a big deal!'"

Kimbriana Settles of Laurel also is a first-generation college student. "It caught me by complete surprise when I opened that packet and saw what I had earned," Settles said. "There was a flood of emotions coming through me: excitement, relief, honor, and the best one -- the 'I did it' feeling."

Lillian Smith of Knightstown wants to broaden her horizons "by experiencing all of the culture and diversity that Indiana University has to offer. "I am humbled by the potential that IU East sees in me, as it really told me that I can make it through college and do great things even when I thought that I couldn't," Smith said.

The Adam W. Herbert Presidential Scholars Program includes exceptionally talented and diverse students across IU. To ensure students make the most of their education at IU, the program provides scholars with a number of academic and career resources designed to support, enrich, and educate. All Herbert Presidential Scholars earned a full-ride scholarship that pays fees and tuition at IU East. The award is renewable each school year, but not transferable to any other campus.

The program features several other great perks, including a new computer, $1,000 toward study abroad, chances to meet leaders at Indiana University and special opportunities for internships and research in their chosen fields.

Take a closer look at the recipients and their paths to the IU East campus in the story below.

A mother's help

Supplied Photo: Jonathan Hardwick and Family
Jonathan Hardwick (far right) with his sister, Ana, father, Paul, and mother Rosanne. Hardwick is from New Castle, Indiana. He is an exploratory major with interests in informatics, marketing and business.

Rosanne Hardwick paved the path toward IU East for her son, Jonathan. She helped set into motion the achievements and the application package that brought him to IU East.

She always helped him when he needed it with homework. She helped him hone his writing. She encouraged him to learn computer programming. She pushed him to be an honor-roll student and an early applicant at IU East.

Now, it's her memory that's helping to push him further.

That's because Rosanne Hardwick died on January 1, 2021, due to complications of COVID-19. "My mom was always behind me," Hardwick said. "She definitely played a big role in me coming here. She worked with (advisors in high school) on getting me a scholarship."

Hardwick wasn't even certain where he wanted to apply when his senior year started at New Castle High School but learned that IU East offers degree programs that match his interests. He also learned the class sizes and the costs were lower than most other colleges. "That's the school for me," he remembers thinking.

It turns out the prodding provided last fall by his mom and advisors paid off because preference for Herbert Scholars is given to students who apply early. IU East nominated him for the honor from information submitted by November 1, 2020.

The ambitious student aims to earn three degrees before he leaves campus. His top choice is informatics, which is defined as information technology applied to human problems. He also is contemplating doing course work toward degrees in marketing and general business.

Hardwick foresees trying to land an internship with a company that deals with computers. "Eventually, I'd like to make video games and then start my own business," said the self-taught computer programmer who already has entrepreneurial ideas for developing new games. "I've been doing that for six years. It's like a puzzle."

He travels to campus on Tuesdays and Thursdays for three classes and also takes one online. He lives in the country just outside of New Castle with his father, Paul Hardwick, and 16-year-old sister, Anna.

Hardwick enjoys talking with fellow students about video games and interacting with his professors. "It's been really great at IU East, I have enjoyed it a lot," he said. "I definitely have connected to some people on campus."

He particularly enjoys having far smaller classes than is possible at major universities. "In high school, there were about 20-25 people in classes and it's about the same at IU East. I like the personal interaction."

A role model for family

Supplied Photo: Ariana Hernandez
Ariana Hernandez is from Richmond, Indiana. She is a social work major.

Ariana Hernandez knew she would become a leader in fourth grade after finding success in the Hibberd Early College Academy. "Since then, I knew I was going to be a role model for my younger cousins and younger brothers (now ages 16 and 13)."

She had moved with her parents, Beatriz Ramirez and Isaul Hernandez, to join other family relatives in Richmond when she was 7 years old.

She quickly had her eyes on attending IU East. "I very much like the smallness of it," she said. "I also like how many resources there are and how close you can get with people. I like starting a whole new journey of meeting people."

Affordability mattered. Her parents don't have the means to pay for college and she already juggles a couple of jobs.

They were "shocked by the amount of money," she said. "They are really happy for me, proud of me because it was based on what I have done."

Hernandez was shocked by the immensity of the award, too.

"I had no idea it was coming," Hernandez said. "I expected to receive some but didn't expect I'd receive this."

Part of her surprise is receiving help in world traveling. "I know I want to study abroad, and now I have the opportunity. I am very excited to do that, but just don't know when or where."

She isn't specific about job plans as she pursues her Bachelor of Social Work degree. "Once I get to my sophomore year and after, I'll branch out," she said. "I just want to be open to all the opportunities my major gives me."

Her educational direction is a direct result of being bilingual and helping her parents, and also people outside the family, as they navigate daily life. She translates papers and helps them to better understand their finances. She works part-time in an accounting job and on weekends as a retail clerk at American Eagle.

She attends classes on campus from Monday through Thursday. Time management obviously is critical, but there always is time to be a leader in her family and community, she said. "I like helping out as much as I can when I can."

Academic rigor appealing

Supplied Photo: Kasey Johnson
Kasey Johnson is from Centerville, Indiana. She is changing to a general studies major.

Its strong academic reputation was the top reason among many that brought Kasey Johnson to IU East.

"The No. 1 reason is the rigor of the coursework," Johnson said. "I view IU East as a prestigious university, and I am honored to be studying here. I know that no matter what I decide to pursue, IU East will go above and beyond in making sure that I am well prepared for it."

Johnson also was drawn by IU East's friendly faculty and staff - and by its proximity to home.

The Herbert Scholar Award was icing on the cake. "It is such a huge honor," she said. "I am so appreciative of IU East for this generous award."

Her experiences so far have proven she made the right choice. "I have really enjoyed getting to know my professors because I can tell that they are all genuinely interested in my success as a student."

Johnson believes it's a huge bonus to have a university like IU East so close to Centerville. "I live only about 15 minutes away, which makes it quick and easy to come to campus each day. This, in turn, makes it much easier on me financially because I am able to still live at home with my family."

The award offers financial relief for Johnson and her encouraging parents, Terry and Tonya Johnson. "They have helped me grow as a student and as an individual in so many ways, and I am forever grateful for that. It's awesome to know that my hard work is recognized and is paying off."

The scholarship helped Johnson buy a new computer "that has helped me tremendously in working on my assignments."

She originally planned on majoring in elementary education but is switching to general studies. "The education program here is wonderful, but I am just not sure that I see myself as a teacher. I chose to switch ... so that I can explore different types of courses and make a more informed decision later about which career I would like to pursue. I am considering the field of accounting, but I am currently open to many different paths."

Award 'means the world'

Supplied Photo: Kimbriana Settles
Kimbriana Settles is from Laurel, Indiana. She plans to major in nursing.

The Herbert Scholar award carries huge significance for Kimbriana Settles.

"This scholarship goes deeper than just getting school paid," she said. "It means the world."

It means the hard work in high school paid off.

It means her parents are being repaid for their sacrifices.

It means she has a better chance of reaching the primary goal that she's had since middle school -- being employed as a pediatric oncology nurse at Cincinnati Children's Hospital.

Settles vividly recalls the thrill of Scholarship Day, the unknowns of what she would receive. She had no idea about the Herbert Presidential Scholar program. "How could I get this lucky?" she thinks.

Ironically, she chose to attend IU East because it has amazing financial-aid opportunities and the nursing program she needs to reach her goals. It also is close to her home and loved ones.

She believes the award is a gift for her parents, Donnie and Kathy Settles, for their dedication. "All I have ever wanted in this world is to find a way to repay my parents for the sacrifices and the time and the energy they have put into me. This scholarship did that for me. It gave me the opportunity to say, 'Here mom, here dad, I did this. I did this for me and you.'"

Settles plans to make the most of her opportunities at IU East. That includes seeking paid and unpaid internships to gain experience as a nurse. "I want to be a labor and delivery nurse (in an intensive care unit) as of right now. There is a hospital around where I live that I would love to get an internship at during the summer. Some of my siblings even had their kids (born) there."

She already plans to use the travel stipend on a senior nursing trip. "I have always wanted to travel abroad, and this is a perfect opportunity for me to do something that I may never get to do again," she said.

Her experiences so far with her classes have proven that she chose the right university. "What has stuck out most to me is the teachers. (They) genuinely care and want the best for you. They work well with you if you are struggling, may need to miss a day, or just genuinely want to help you succeed in their classes."

Financial relief for future doctor

Supplied Photo: Lillian Smith
Lillian Smith is from New Palestine, Indiana. She is majoring in biochemistry with minors in neuroscience and in psychology.

Lillian Smith is following in the footsteps of her grandmother -- a nursing graduate of IU East -- in seeking the degrees necessary to forge a successful career in the medical field.

Smith has long-term plans to attend medical school with her sights set on becoming a surgeon.

Toward that goal, she is majoring in biochemistry at IU East with minors in neuroscience and in psychology.

Smith said the Herbert Scholars award certainly was unforeseen, but it's much appreciated. "It was a huge surprise, as I wasn't expecting to be picked for such a prestigious honor," she said.

The financial aspects of the award will make her college path much easier. It delivers a much-needed relief from her initial concerns about ways to pay for her undergraduate classes.

Simply put, her parents couldn't afford to pay for college, Smith said. "Getting this scholarship made me less apprehensive about starting, as I wouldn't have to work full time in order to pay for school. This has also eliminated my need to take out student loans, allowing me to finish college with no debt."

She is happy to have the stipend option for studying abroad but hasn't decided on whether she will use it.

Smith works at Brewfus, IU East's coffee shop, as a barista while also working toward her degree.

Her classroom experiences so far have been very positive, something she had expected. "I picked Indiana University East specifically because it has a much smaller class size, and I wanted a more personal touch on my education than I could get elsewhere. Now that I'm here, the personal attention I've received in class has really solidified that I made the correct choice."

Reid's Athletic Training Services Provide Nearly $500,000 in Benefits to Area Schools

Posted December 2, 2021, 2021

Supplied Photo: Brayton Kiedrowski, DO, Reid Health Orthopedics (right) presents a check to Northeastern High School Athletic Director Gerry Keesling. A basketball player at Centerville rolls their ankle. A track athlete at Hagerstown feels a twinge in their hamstring. A football player at Richmond comes out of a hard-fought game with various bumps and bruises.

What is one thing each of them has in common? They'll be treated by a certified athletic trainer from Reid Health, free of charge to the school or the student-athlete.

At eight area high schools -- Centerville, Connersville, Hagerstown, Lincoln, Northeastern, Richmond, Union City, and Winchester -- Reid provides a full-time athletic trainer while Randolph Southern and Seton Catholic split one.

Combined with annual donations made to the schools by Community Benefit for athletic training supplies and the cost of concussion testing covered by the Reid Health Foundation, Reid provides nearly $500,000 in benefits split between those 10 area schools each year.

"Athletic trainers are very valuable, and we're pleased to be able to provide this service to our communities," said Jesse Tittle, Sports Medicine Outreach Manager for Reid Health Rehabilitation Services.

"We're the ones who are there for prevention. We're the ones who are there when injuries happen. We're there to be the bridge to any extra services that are needed."

Athletic trainers have been out in the community serving one person, one team, one school at a time since 1997. Although schools that contracted with Reid paid for the services in the program's early years, Reid has been providing athletic trainers at no cost to the schools for several years now.

"Athletic trainers are very valuable, and we're pleased to be able to provide this service to our communities. We're the ones who are there for prevention. We're the ones who are there when injuries happen. We're there to be the bridge to any extra services that are needed." -- Jesse Tittle, Sports Medicine Outreach Manager for Reid Health Rehabilitation Services

Duties for the athletic trainers run the gamut from injury prevention to emergency care, injury assessment, treatment and rehabilitation, and return to play. They also can provide care for others within the school system and have even found themselves called upon to take action in emergency health situations with fans at games.

"We get so many coaches who come in, teachers, kids who get hurt in recess, the contract is really with the school system," Tittle said. "We end up with a much broader clientele who comes to us seeking services."

Last year, Reid's athletic trainers helped care for nearly 2,000 high school student-athletes across the 10 schools.

"Beyond the combined monetary value of the athletic trainer's salary, the supplies, and the baseline concussion testing, there's value to having an athletic trainer at these schools that you can't put a number to," Tittle said. "Just think of the health benefits for all those we serve as well."

Should a student-athlete's needs go beyond what can be done at their school, Reid's Athletic Training Clinic at 1400 Highland Road in Richmond stands ready to help. Services there are not part of the contracted program with the school systems, but sessions are very affordable, costing an average of $7 a visit. The clinic has everything needed to help athletes stay in the game or get back quicker after an injury.

For more information about the athletic training program, the Athletic Training Clinic, or other sports medicine services offered by Reid, go to reidhealth.org/services/sports-medicine, visit the Reid Health Athletics page on Facebook, or call (765) 973-8057.

Getting Vaccinated for COVID-19 Helps Slow Appearance of New Variants

Posted December 2, 2021, 2021

As health officials around the world work to understand the latest COVID-19 variant to cause global concern -- now known as Omicron -- it's important to remember the best way to fight against the emergence of new versions of the coronavirus that causes COVID-19 is by getting vaccinated.

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), viruses constantly change through mutation as they make their way through the population. Reducing spread -- through common techniques such as masks, social distancing, hand washing, and, most importantly, vaccination -- limits the opportunities for a virus to change.

"Since the vaccines became available, it has been a race to get shots in as many arms as possible before a variant comes along that is more contagious, causes more severe illness, or even beats the vaccines," said Thomas Huth, MD, Vice President of Medical Affairs for Reid Health.

"Now we're seeing some waning effectiveness in the prevention of spread for those who were among the first to be vaccinated. For those people, it is imperative that they get a booster shot when eligible not only for their own protection but to again reduce the virus's opportunities to mutate."

Variants are classified by the World Health Organization (WHO) into one of two categories -- Variants of Interest and Variants of Concern -- based on how easily they spread, how severe are the symptoms they cause, and how well vaccines and other safety measures protect against them.

There have been five variants to be defined as Variants of Concern, including Delta -- the version that fueled the latest local wave of cases beginning in late July -- and the newly discovered Omicron.

So far, the COVID-19 vaccines have proven to be effective against the variants that have appeared, but health officials worry that might not always be the case.

The vaccines cause cells to imitate a harmless spike protein from the coronavirus, teaching the immune system to recognize and fight the virus. But mutations in that spike protein on the coronavirus could cause it to evade the body's immune response.

"Since the vaccines became available, it has been a race to get shots in as many arms as possible before a variant comes along that is more contagious, causes more severe illness, or even beats the vaccines." -- Thomas Huth, MD, Vice President of Medical Affairs

One of the reasons why Omicron already has the Variant of Concern designation is the number of mutations on its spike protein. Whether that will prove to be a problem for the COVID-19 vaccines will be determined by health officials over the coming weeks as they continue to study the new variant.

COVID-19 vaccinations are FREE and widely available, including at Lingle Grand Hall on the lower level of Reid Health's main campus in Richmond. Hours there are 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays. All three vaccines are available at the site.

Anyone 18 and older also can get a booster shot at the same location provided it has been either six months (for Pfizer and Moderna recipients) or two months (for Johnson & Johnson recipients) since their initial dose.

Appointments can be made by going to ourshot.in.gov.

November 30th's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 38
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 31 (81.6%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 5
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 4 (80%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 2
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 2 (100%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 374
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 55 (14.7% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 23

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Managing Issues Caused by Serious Illness Focus of December's Medical Monday Event

Posted November 29, 2021, 2021

If you know someone who is struggling to manage the symptoms and stress that come from a serious illness, December's Medical Monday event will focus on an option that would help improve their quality of life.

Brenda Carr-Vogelgesang, NP, will present "What to Expect When Seeking Palliative Care" on Monday, Dec. 13, at Central United Methodist Church, 1425 E. Main St. in Richmond.

Palliative care is a medical specialty that works together with primary treatment to help the patient and their family manage the issues brought on by a serious illness. It's appropriate at any age and any stage of illness.

The free event will begin at 1 p.m. To register, call Sharrie Harlin Davis at (765) 983-3000, ext. 4676. Masks are required to attend.

Medical Monday is supported by Reid Health Community Benefit. Harlin Davis started the event when she was working for the Minority Health Coalition and maintained it after joining Reid Health. The event has a loyal following, averaging 40 to 50 guests each month to learn about various health issues, community programs, and health screenings.

Local War Heros: A Salute to the 80th Anniversary of Pearl Harbor and the Heroes Involved

Posted November 29, 2021, 2021

Supplied Image: Duane HodginLocal author, Duane Hodgin, will present a program at the Morrisson-Reeves Library on December 7 to celebrate the eightieth anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor, December 7, 1941. The event will begin at 10:00 am. Free copies of Hodgin's latest and final book, Combat Stories from WW II, Korea, Vietnam, Iraq and Afghanistan: Memories of Those Who Were There 1941-2010 will be distributed to attendees.

Hodgin will share the stories of three men who were at Pearl Harbor during the attack as well as memories of those who were in combat during WW II, Korea, Vietnam, Iraq, and Afghanistan. The stories are based on over 200 interviews that Hodgin did from 2012-2018. His three previous books were: WW II: They served in America's Darkest and Finest Hours; Korea and Vietnam: Forgotten Warriors Against the Odds; and Boots on the Sand: The War on Terror.

Hodgin will speak about some of the men involved in combat and share their memories of loneliness, uncertainty, fear, horror, and the acts of bravery and courage they witnessed.

These stories must be recorded and told lest we forget, and they become lost in the sands of history.

Ask a Lawyer:Free, Private Attorney Sessions Offered at MRL

Posted November 29, 2021, 2021

Supplied Flyer: Ask a LawyerThe Whitewater Valley Pro Bono Commission, Inc., presents "Ask a Lawyer" at Morrisson-Reeves Library on Thursday, December 2nd from 4:00 to 6:00 p.m.

This event will be held in the Library's Bard Room. Local residents who are unable to pay for private counsel are invited to engage in free 10-15 minute consultations regarding family law and other civil legal matters with an attorney. Sessions are not scheduled in advance. Service is offered on a first come –first serve arrangement.

ALL MRL Covid protocol will be followed; Masks are required for the event.

Reid Earns Recognition for Smooth Installation of New Care Management System

Posted November 29, 2021, 2021

Reid Health's recent implementation of a new digital care management system went so well, the organization has been rewarded by the company that provides the software.

"This award is a great compliment of our team's hard work in following Epic's rigorous recommendations. This is an organization-wide award. Our IT staff couldn't have done it without the support of many others throughout the Reid team." -- Angie Dickman, Vice President for Reid Health

Epic Systems' Good Install Program outlines best practices for successful installation of the company's products. It tracks progress throughout the process to help ensure health systems, such as Reid, are fully staffed with certified project team members, that end users are well prepared to be productive when the software goes live, and more.

When the new system rolled out, the transition was seamless for patients, and Reid was able to maintain its regular volumes. According to the company, Reid's performance was above average and the health system's Progress Report score is in Epic's top quartile.

Altogether, the work by Reid staff earned Epic's Good Install achievement.

"This award is a great compliment of our team's hard work in following Epic's rigorous recommendations," said Angie Dickman, Vice President for Reid Health. "This is an organization-wide award. Our IT staff couldn't have done it without the support of many others throughout the Reid team."

Epic's software serves as a complete digital care management system, including electronic medical recordkeeping; MyChart, the communication portal Reid uses for connecting with patients; and much more.

"The Epic system will help us provide better long-term care for our patients," Dickman said.

COVID-19 Vaccine Booster Shots Now Available for Anyone 18 Years and Up

Posted November 29, 2021, 2021

Reid Health now has COVID-19 vaccine booster shots available for those 18 years and older who already have received their initial doses.

The U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently expanded booster shot eligibility for the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines. Now -- no matter which vaccine you initially received -- if you are at least 18 years old, you can get a booster shot.

Those who originally were vaccinated with either Pfizer or Moderna can get a booster six months after their second dose. Johnson & Johnson recipients can get a booster two months after their one dose.

All those eligible for a booster can choose whichever vaccine they would like for the extra shot.

Reid is giving FREE vaccinations in Lingle Hall on the lower level of the main campus in Richmond from 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays. All three vaccines are available at that site.

November 23rd's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 35
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 24 (68.6%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 6
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 5 (83.3%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 4
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 3 (75%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 291
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 40 (13.7% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 22

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

"Connecting" Art Exhibit at Reid Health

Posted November 18, 2021, 2021

Supplied Painting: Going Home Supplied Painting: October Hills Supplied Painting: A Winter's Dream
Going Home October Hills A Winter's Dream

Annette Warfel's beautiful oil and pastel paintings are currently on display in the MacDowell Gallery at Reid Hospital. Warfel discovered painting at age 59 when she enrolled in a pastel workshop at the Richmond Art Museum. Earlier in her life she had worked as a staff writer in the Palladium-Item features department and later did freelance work. Warfel says that "connecting with this part of myself was a life-changing experience that seemed both a complete surprise and an affirmation. I've continued to study art since that first class in 2009 and plan to grow old with a paintbrush in hand."

The exhibit features a variety of paintings celebrating nature and landscape, especially the Midwest countryside, and will appeal to viewers who share a deep connection with the land. Most of the works are available for purchase. The MacDowell Gallery is located on the second floor of the hospital and the current exhibit will be on display through the end of the year.

Reid Earns 5-star Ratings for Stroke, Sepsis, Spinal Fusion Care

Posted November 18, 2021, 2021

Reid Health is 5-star rated for stroke, sepsis, and spinal fusion outcomes according to new research released by Healthgrades.

Every year, Healthgrades evaluates hospital performance at nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide for 31 of the most common inpatient procedures and conditions.

Patients treated at hospitals receiving a 5-star rating have a lower risk of death and a lower risk of experiencing one or more complications during a hospital stay than if they were treated at hospitals receiving a 1-star rating in that procedure or condition.

From 2018 through 2020, if all hospitals as a group performed similarly to hospitals receiving 5 stars as a group, on average, 218,141 lives could potentially have been saved and complications in 156,050 patients could potentially have been avoided.

From 2018-2020, patients treated for stroke in hospitals with 5 stars for in-hospital mortality had an average of 51.7% lower risk of dying than if they were treated in hospitals with 1 star. During that same time, patients treated for sepsis in hospitals with 1 star for in-hospital mortality were on average 1.6 times more likely to die than if they were treated in hospitals with 5 stars.

"Consumers are increasingly becoming aware of the differences of care provided by different hospitals. Consumers can feel confident that hospitals receiving a Healthgrades 5-star rating have demonstrated exceptional outcomes and their ability to provide quality care," said Brad Bowman, M.D., Chief Medical Officer and Head of Data Science at Healthgrades.

"These awards are reflections of the hard work put in every day by our teams and their dedication to providing high-quality care to our patients," said Misti Foust-Cofield, Vice President/Chief Nursing Officer for Reid Health. "We are committed to helping the people in our communities become healthier and thrive."

This is the fourth year in a row Reid has earned a 5-star rating for stroke care from Healthgrades while the achievements in sepsis and spinal fusion are firsts for the health system.

"While our first and foremost goal at Reid Health is the health and well-being of our patients, community, and staff, it is rewarding to be recognized as a national competitor in the fields of stroke, sepsis, and spinal fusion care by Healthgrades," said Joseph Clemente, M.D., Chief of Staff for Reid Health.

"This demonstrates that in addition to being an excellent hometown hospital, we are also regional leaders in healthcare."

"These awards are reflections of the hard work put in every day by our teams and their dedication to providing high-quality care to our patients. We are committed to helping the people in our communities become healthier and thrive." -- Misti Foust-Cofield, Vice President/Chief Nursing Officer

Reid received the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association's Get With The Guidelines®-Stroke Gold Plus Quality Achievement Award earlier this year. The award recognizes the hospital's commitment to ensuring stroke patients receive the most appropriate treatment according to nationally recognized, research-based guidelines based on the latest scientific evidence.

Reid also received the association's Target: Stroke EliteTM award. To qualify, hospitals must meet quality measures developed to reduce the time between the patient's arrival at the hospital and treatment with the clot-buster tissue plasminogen activator, or tPA, the only drug approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat ischemic stroke.

For its analysis, Healthgrades evaluated about 45 million Medicare inpatient records for nearly 4,500 short-term acute care hospitals nationwide to assess hospital performance in 31 common conditions and procedures and evaluated outcomes in appendectomy and bariatric surgery using all-payer data provided by 16 states.

Healthgrades recognizes a hospital's quality achievements for cohort-specific performance, specialty area performance, and overall clinical quality. Individual procedure or condition cohorts are designated as 5-star (statistically significantly better than expected), 3-star (not statistically different from expected), and 1-star (statistically significantly worse than expected).

* Statistics are based on Healthgrades analysis of MedPAR data for years 2018 through 2020 and represent three-year estimates for Medicare patients only. Due to the highly variable impact of the pandemic on hospital outcomes, Healthgrades made the decision to exclude cases with a COVID-19 diagnosis from the 2020 data to preserve the statistical integrity of their models and fairly evaluate clinical outcomes at all hospitals. To view the complete methodology, visit www.healthgrades.com/quality/ratings-awards/methodology.

Reid Will Consolidate COVID-19 Vaccination Efforts at One Location

Posted November 16, 2021, 2021

Beginning Thursday, Nov. 18, Reid Health will move its public COVID-19 vaccination efforts to one location -- Lingle Hall in the lower level of the hospital.

FREE vaccinations will be available there 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday.

This location will replace the sites currently in use, including Reid Plaza on Richmond's west side and the clinic on the hospital's main concourse.

The change was made necessary when sewer issues were discovered recently at the Reid Plaza site. Those issues do not affect Reid's PACE Center or any of the tenants occupying other suites at the plaza.

Anyone 5 years and older can be vaccinated at the Lingle Hall location. Appointments can be made by going to ourshot.in.gov. Walk-ins are welcome as well.

Those wishing to have a child between the ages of 5 and 11 vaccinated are asked to make an appointment to allow for thawing and prepping of the children's dose.

Only the Pfizer vaccine has been given Emergency Use Authorization by federal health officials for those under the age of 18. Parents or legal guardians of minor children who will be vaccinated need to be present at the child's appointment.

November 16th's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 31
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 21 (67.7%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 7
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 7 (100%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 4
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 4 (100%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 548
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 34 (6.2% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 9

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Save Big When Shopping Small in Wayne County

Posted November 15, 2021, 2021

Supplied Photo/Graphic: Shop Small Savings PassportKick off your holiday shopping by supporting small, local businesses in Wayne County! Small Business Saturday is happening November 27, 2021, the Saturday after Thanksgiving and is a day to celebrate our local businesses and promote local shopping. The Wayne County Tourism Bureau has partnered with the Wayne County Area Chamber of Commerce to create a fun way to celebrate this important occasion.

Shoppers can pick up a Shop Small Savings Passport at one of over 35 participating locations featuring deals and specials from November 27th through December 4th. In addition to great deals and specials, businesses will have a limited supply of free Shop Small canvas bags as part of the American Express Shop Small® initiative. The Shop Small Savings Passport is an approved project through the American Express Neighborhood Champion program.

Those who participate in the savings passport are encouraged to use #ShopSmallWC, tag the Wayne County Tourism Bureau at @VisitRichmondIN or The Wayne County Area Chamber of Commerce at @wcacc to share their purchases and exciting stops during their shopping experience.

For a list of participating businesses or to download a digital copy of the passport, shoppers can visit: https://www.visitrichmond.org/visitors/things-to-do/shop-small-business-saturday-2021

Singles Interaction, Inc.

Posted November 15, 2021, 2021

Supplied Newsletter: December 2021 Singles Interaction

If you are 21 years of age or better and single, divorced, widow or widower, Singles' Interaction invites you to join them on Friday nights. Come to the Eagles Lodge, 75 South 12th Street, Richmond (membership not required) and meet other single people in the Richmond area.

Reid Set to Begin COVID-19 Vaccinations for Children Ages 5-11

Posted November 15, 2021, 2021

Beginning Thursday, Nov. 11, Reid Health will offer COVID-19 vaccinations to children ages 5-11 years old.

Reid will have FREE shots for that age group available at the vaccination clinic at Reid Plaza, 2300 National Road W. in Richmond. Hours there are 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Thursday, noon-4 p.m. Friday, and 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday.

Indiana residents can sign up for an appointment at the Reid Plaza clinic or other nearby locations by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents looking for vaccination sites should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.

Walk-ins are welcome at the Reid Plaza site as well.

Only the Pfizer vaccine has been given Emergency Use Authorization by federal health officials for those under the age of 18. Parents or legal guardians of minor children who will be vaccinated need to be present at the child's appointment.

Although COVID-19 infection has typically led to less serious illness in children than adults, they can still get sick -- sometimes severely or even deathly so -- and they can pass it along to others who might be more vulnerable to the virus such as older family members, caregivers, teachers and staff members at their schools, or even others their own age who might be immunocompromised or have other underlying health conditions.

Getting your child vaccinated not only protects themselves but also your family and all those who come into contact with your child.

Like those 12 and older who receive the Pfizer vaccine, children ages 5-11 will need a second dose three weeks after their first shot. Typical side effects are the same as those experienced by adults -- including arm soreness or redness, headache, muscle pain, tiredness, and chills -- and they usually go away within a few days.

November 10th's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 29
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 19 (65.5%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 4
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 4 (100%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 4
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 4 (100%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 320
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 19 (5.9% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 23

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Have You Had COVID-19? It's Still a Good Idea to Get Vaccinated

Posted November 15, 2021, 2021

Even if you've already had COVID-19, you should still get vaccinated, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Having already been infected by the coronavirus provides some level of natural immunity, but research has not yet shown just how long -- or how well -- you'll be protected.

The CDC says there is growing reason to believe being fully vaccinated offers better protection than natural immunity. One study showed unvaccinated people who already had COVID-19 are more than two times as likely as fully vaccinated people to get sick again.

If you test positive for COVID-19 before getting vaccinated or between doses of the two-shot Pfizer or Moderna vaccines, you'll need to wait until after you are well enough to end your isolation period or for those who become more severely ill, until after you've left the hospital.

If you've been exposed to someone with COVID-19, you should wait until your quarantine period has ended.

Anyone receiving monoclonal antibodies or convalescent plasma should wait 90 days after treatment to get vaccinated.

If you need to be tested for COVID-19, Reid Health offers drive-thru testing at 1200 Chester Blvd. in Richmond. Appointments there are available from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily, starting Monday, Nov. 15.

Reid's COVID-19 Hotline staff can assist with scheduling a test, receiving test results, and seeking clinical advice, including for monoclonal antibody treatment. The hotline is open seven days a week by calling (765) 965-4200. Hours are 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

November 12th's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 26
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 18 (69.2%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 5
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 5 (100%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 4
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 4 (100%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 207
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 35 (16.9% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 20

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Senior Adult Ministry November Meeting

Posted November 10, 2021, 2021

The Senior Adult Ministry invites seniors who are 50 years or older to our annual Thanksgiving pitch-in dinner. It will be held at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, November 30, at First United Methodist Church, 318 National Road West, Richmond, IN.

Bring a dish to share and invite a friend to enjoy the food and fellowship.

Senior Adult Ministry is an active group of seniors over 50 years old open to all regardless of religious affiliation. The group is guided by Pastor Judi Marshall, Clara Bulmer and Beverly Kirby. These three women actively share their gifts of ministry, hospitality and creativity in planning and organizing the monthly meetings.

For further information, call 765-962-4357.

ASPIN Health Navigator Program

Posted November 10, 2021, 2021

Supplied Flyer: ASPIN Navigator

Navigators are available by phone, Zoom, or Skype to help you idenƟfy and enroll in plans that best fit your needs. No advanced appointments are necessary. Call 877-313-7215 Monday through Friday during business hours 8:30 – 4:30 or via the web 24/7 at www.aspinhealthnavigator.org.

About ASPIN

Affiliated Service Providers of Indiana (ASPIN), a501(C) 3 not for profit network, operates four major service lines: behavioral health services, professional training and workforce development, grants management, and health improvement. The mission of ASPIN is to provide innovaƟve educatonal programs, resource management, program development, and network management in collaboraton with all healthcare entites to address health disparites and whole health management.

You Might Qualify for Free or Low-Cost Health Insurance

Posted November 10, 2021, 2021

Supplied Flyer: ASPIN Health Navigator

If you're uninsured or about to lose your health insurance, you might qualify for free or low-cost health insurance.

If you're under 65, find out if you qualify for free or low-cost health insurance! Call a Navigator at (877) 313-7215

Have questions or need help? ASPIN Health Navigators offer free, one-on-one help to get you signed up for health coverage. Call us toll free at: (877) 313-7215

State Reminds Veterans, Public Safety Officers About Student Financial Aid Options Ahead of Veterans Day 2021

Posted November 10, 2021, 2021

(INDIANAPOLIS) – Hoosier veterans and their families may be eligible for a variety of financial aid options, says the Indiana Commission for Higher Education. The Commission administers seven financial aid programs specifically for veterans, public safety officers and their families, including children and spouses.

Ahead of Veterans Day 2021, the Commission and state of Indiana are reminding Hoosier veterans and their families of the student financial aid options available, including up to 100 percent of tuition and regularly assessed fees at Indiana public colleges and universities. In 2019, these programs disbursed more than $32 million.

"Indiana's veterans and public safety officers play a valuable role in preserving our state's freedom and safety," said Indiana Commissioner for Higher Education Teresa Lubbers. "Indiana's tuition and fee exemption programs provide the brave men and women, and their children and spouses, with peace of mind when it comes to affording higher education."

Available financial aid programs include:

  • Child of Deceased or Disabled Veteran: Provides up to 100 percent tuition and regularly assessed fees at Indiana public college and universities for children of veterans who served in the armed forces during a time of war, was recognized by the award of a service or campaign medal, or who suffered a service-connected death or disability.
  • Children of Purple Heart Recipient or Wounded Veteran: Provides up to 100 percent of tuition and regularly assessed fees at Indiana public college and universities for students who are children of a person who served in the armed forces of the United States and received the Purple Heart decoration or was wounded as a result of enemy action, among other requirements.
  • Children and Spouse of Indiana National Guard: The Commission offers a supplement to other state grants by covering 100 percent of tuition and regularly assessed fees at Indiana public college and universities for students who are the child or spouse of a member of the Indiana National Guard who suffered a service-connected death while serving on state active duty.
  • Indiana Purple Heart Recipient: Provides up to 100 percent of tuition and regularly assessed fees for students at Indiana public college and universities who received the Purple Heart decoration or was wounded as a result of enemy action.
  • National Guard Tuition Supplement Grant: Through a partnership with the Indiana National Guard, the Commission guarantees 100 percent of tuition and regularly assessed fees at Indiana public college and universities for eligible members of the Indiana Air and Army National Guard. Students can attend either full-time or part-time and receive the National Guard Tuition Supplement Grant (NGSG) but can only be used in the fall and spring semesters.
  • Soldiers' and Sailors' Children's Home: The Commission offers a supplement to other state grants by guaranteeing 100 percent of tuition and regularly assessed fees at Indiana public college and universities for students who are former students and/or graduates of Morton Memorial High School and former residents of the Indiana Soldiers' and Sailors' Children's Home (ISSCH).
  • Children and Spouse of Public Safety Officers: Provides up to 100 percent of tuition and regularly assessed fees at Indiana public college and universities for students who are children or spouses of certain Indiana public safety officers (PSO) killed in the line of duty or permanently disabled state troopers.

All students must file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) each year to use the tuition and fee exemption programs. Applications for state financial aid must be submitted online through the Student ScholarTrack account, available at ScholarTrack.IN.gov.

Questions may be submitted to the Commission for Higher Education by calling 1-888-528-4719 or emailing awards@che.in.gov

Grief Toolkits Distributed to Area Children

Posted November 10, 2021, 2021

EverHeart Hospice has distributed grief toolkits to area children coping with the loss of someone special in their lives.

Typically, EverHeart Hospice hosts their annual Camp Encourage for children aged 6-15 experiencing loss. The camp provides a supportive and welcoming environment for children to sort through their feelings and lets them know they are not alone in these thoughts. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the in-person camp was canceled for 2021, but the organization still wanted to provide support for the campers. The toolkits were designed to meet this need in a format that could be personally delivered to each child at home.

"We knew that just because the camp was canceled this year, that doesn't mean their grief was canceled," said Sarah DePoy, Bereavement Coordinator at EverHeart Hospice. "The past year has been an emotional roller coaster for everyone, and we want these children to know they are still supported."

The way children experience and express their grief varies from child to child. The goal of the box is to provide coping skills to help children self-regulate their emotions. Each toolkit contains a variety of sensory objects for children to explore as an outlet for the emotions they may be experiencing.

Instructions for how each item can aid in this process were provided in the boxes. Examples of items provided include journals, tangrams, coloring books, and stress balls, among several others. In total, about 30 toolkits, packaged in a vintage-style lunch tin, were distributed.

Just like Camp Encourage, the Grief toolkits were provided to children free of charge thanks to the generosity of community donations and grants.

The response to the toolkits from caretakers was overwhelmingly positive, and several children have expressed interest in volunteering for Camp Encourage in the future.

"To have such young children already realizing that they can make a positive impact on future generations of campers because of a program we were able to provide to them is humbling," shared DePoy.

EverHeart Hospice is hopeful that Camp Encourage will resume in person for 2022.

To learn more about Camp Encourage or the Bereavement Support available from EverHeart Hospice, call 1-800-417-7535 or visit their website at everhearthospice.org.

Reid Health Administers 50,000th COVID-19 Vaccine Dose

Posted November 8, 2021, 2021

Over the weekend, Reid Health passed a milestone in the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic, administering its 50,000th vaccine dose.

Reid began giving FREE COVID-19 vaccinations in mid-December and continues to do so at two locations available to the public:

Reid Plaza, 2300 National Road W., Richmond with hours of 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Thursday, noon-4 p.m. Friday, and 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday, and the main concourse of Reid Health Hospital next to the Home Medical Equipment store with hours of 6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Walk-ins are welcome at both sites, but appointments are preferred. Indiana residents can find vaccination locations and sign up for a first, second, or booster shot appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.

The one-dose Johnson & Johnson vaccine is only available at the hospital clinic. Both locations have the two-dose Pfizer and Moderna vaccines.

Only those 18 and up can receive Johnson & Johnson or Moderna. Although Pfizer recently was approved for ages 5-11, Reid at this time is only administering the Pfizer vaccine at these locations to those 12 and older while we wait for an allotment of the version specifically made for the younger age group.

Parents or legal guardians of minor children who will be vaccinated need to be present at the time of vaccination.

November 8th's COVID-19 Stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 25
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 20 (80%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 4
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 4 (100%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 3
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 3 (100%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 567
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 16 (2.8% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 24

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Singles Interaction, Inc.

Posted October 22, 2021

Supplied Newsletter:  November 2021

If you are 21 years of age or better and single, divorced, widow or widower, Singles' Interaction invites you to join them on Friday nights. Come to the Eagles Lodge, 75 South 12th Street, Richmond (membership not required) and meet other single people in the Richmond area.

Mayor Dave Snow Announces New Director of Strategic Initiatives and Director of I & D

Posted November 3, 2021

Mayor Dave Snow has appointed Beth Fields to the position of Director of Strategic Initiatives, effective Monday, November 15. This new position, created through the annual budget process, is designed to assist the City of Richmond in several collaborative initiatives. The Director of Strategic Initiatives will work hand in hand with local, county, state and federal officials and organizations to manage and oversee critical projects. These initiatives include implementation of our community action plan, Richmond Rising, projects in the recently submitted READI application, downtown development, the new PLACE Program, and OCRA's Hoosier Enduring Legacy Program. This position will also focus on leveraging American Rescue Plan funding and securing other local, state and federal dollars for the betterment of Richmond and Wayne County.

Fields, who previously served as Richmond City Controller, worked as the Executive Director of the Urban Enterprise Association as well as Program Director for Main Street Richmond before joining the City.

The Office of Strategic Initiatives, consisting of the Director of Strategic Initiatives, as well as the Community Development Coordinator, will be part of the Mayor's Administrative team and will not stand alone as a department.

As Fields transitions into the Office of Strategic Initiatives, City Planner, Ian Vanness, will assume the position of Director of Infrastructure and Development per an appointment of the Mayor. Vanness holds a Master's degree in Community Planning and a Geographic Information Science Certificate from the University of Cincinnati and served in Cincinnati's Planning Department. He joined the City in June of last year.

This will leave an opening in Richmond's City Planner position. The City is currently accepting resumes and preparing to conduct interviews. Ian Vanness will continue to serve as City Planner during the search.

Mayor Snow said: "There is a tremendous amount of positive momentum happening in Richmond right now. We've been through a really rough couple years, however our horizon is bright. This is a critical time to harness this positive motion and make certain Richmond stands out as a point of attraction while population and moving trends shift nationwide. Richmond is America's next great city! Beth Fields has shown exceptional leadership throughout her tenure with our City Team. She is certainly the right person at the helm of this new position. Mr. Vanness will serve as a perfect fit for Ms. Field's replacement. Ian has shown himself to be a hard worker and a strong Departmental leader"

Beth Fields said: "I am incredibly excited to assume this new role focused on turning the community's visions into results. Richmond is poised for positive change. This change will simultaneously transform the landscape of our city while maintaining the community feel and characteristics valued by us all."

Vanness said: "I'm grateful for the opportunity to serve the Richmond community in the role of Director of Infrastructure and Development. I'm excited to continue advancing all of the positive work the City has underway and on the horizon."

Some State Park Properties to Temporarily Close for Deer Hunts

Posted November 3, 2021

Select Indiana State Park properties will close temporarily for controlled deer management hunts in the coming weeks.

Each hunt runs two days. The first hunt is on Monday, Nov. 15, and Tuesday, Nov. 16. The second is on Monday, Nov. 29, and Tuesday, Nov. 30. The participating state park properties will close to the general public on the evening before each of the two hunts.

Participating state park properties are: Chain O'Lakes, Clifty Falls, Fort Harrison, Indiana Dunes, Lincoln, Ouabache, Pokagon, Potato Creek, Shakamak, Spring Mill, Summit Lake, Tippecanoe River, Turkey Run, Versailles, and Whitewater Memorial state parks, as well as Cave River Valley Natural Area and Trine State Recreation Area.

These state park properties will re-open the morning after each two-day hunt. All other Indiana state park properties will be open and operate under normal hours.

Indiana DNR biologists evaluate which state park properties require a deer management hunt each year based on habitat recovery and previous harvest rates at each park. The state parks are home to numerous natural communities that serve as significant habitat. The deer management hunts help control browsing by deer to a level that ensures habitat for native plants and animals.

Only individuals selected from the draw may participate at any site.

A full report on the 2020 deer management hunts is at stateparks.IN.gov/files/sp-DeerRMRR.pdf. The 2021 report will be available in March 2022.

Information regarding 2022 state park deer management hunts, including online applications, will be available next summer at on.IN.gov/reservedhunt. The application deadline is usually in mid-August of the year in which the hunts are to take place.

To view all DNR news releases, please see dnr.IN.gov.

DNR Offers Free Admission to Veterans, Active-Duty Military, Nov. 11

Posted November 3, 2021

All veterans and active-duty military personnel, and everyone in their vehicle, will be admitted free to DNR state parks, reservoir properties, state forest recreation areas and state off-road vehicle riding areas on Veterans Day, Thursday, Nov. 11.

This includes admission to Falls of the Ohio State Park's Interpretive Center.

"We appreciate the sacrifices and service of our veterans and active-duty military and look forward to recognizing them with a day to explore some of the best outdoor places in our state," said Terry Coleman, director of Indiana State Parks.

Veterans and military personnel should present ID or evidence of military service where entrance gates are in operation. For proof of military status, gate attendants will accept:

  • Discharge papers (veteran's DD Form 214)
  • Veteran license plates: Ex-POW, Purple Heart, Disabled Hoosier Veteran, Pearl Harbor Survivor. Veteran license plates also include:
    • Air Force Veteran
    • Army Veteran
    • Coast Guard Veteran
    • Marine Corps Veteran
    • Merchant Marine Veteran
    • Navy Veteran
  • U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Disability Award Letter
  • Veterans hunting and fishing license
  • Documents showing veteran benefits with veteran's name on document
  • Any other certificate or verification letter or form that establishes past or present military service

For general information about state park, reservoir, forest properties, and state off-road vehicle riding areas, see dnr.IN.gov.

For information about interpretive programs at state parks and reservoirs, see interpretiveservices.IN.gov.

To view all DNR news releases, please see dnr.IN.gov.

Why Should I Have My Child Vaccinated for COVID-19?

Posted November 3, 2021

With children as young as 5 years old expected to soon be eligible for COVID-19 vaccinations, many parents are likely considering the same question: Should I take my child to get vaccinated?

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and groups such as the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), the answer is "yes."

Although COVID-19 infection has typically led to less serious illness in children than adults, they can still get sick -- sometimes severely or even deathly so -- and they can pass it along to others who might be more vulnerable to the virus such as older family members, caregivers, teachers and staff members at their schools, or even others their own age who might be immunocompromised or have other underlying health conditions.

Getting your child vaccinated not only protects themselves but also your family and all those who come into contact with your child.

So far, the only COVID-19 vaccine approved for those younger than 18 is Pfizer's product, which is safe and effective. Typical side effects are the same as those experienced by adults -- including arm soreness or redness, headache, muscle pain, tiredness, and chills -- and they usually go away within a few days.

There have been rare cases of heart inflammation called myocarditis and pericarditis in children and young adults who have received the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines, but according to the AAP, the risk for inflammation is much higher from COVID-19 infection than from the vaccine.

For the few who have experienced myocarditis or pericarditis after vaccination, most of those who received care responded well to medicine and rest and felt better quickly, according to the CDC.

Some other common concerns from parents include:

  • Can my child get COVID-19 from the vaccine? NO. None of the authorized vaccines contain the live virus that causes the illness, which means the vaccines cannot make you sick with COVID-19.
  • Will I have to delay my child's other vaccinations? NO. The COVID-19 vaccines can be given at the same time as any other vaccines, including the flu shot.
  • Will the vaccine affect my child's future fertility? NO. There is no evidence that any vaccines -- including the COVID-19 vaccines -- cause fertility problems now or in the future.

FREE vaccinations are available at a number of nearby locations. Indiana residents can find sites and sign up for an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.

November 2nd's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 28
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 22 (78.6%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 7
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 6 (85.7%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 5
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 4 (80%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 223
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 14 (6.3% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 12

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

2021 Paul and Pat Lingle Scholars Are Richmond, Northeastern Graduates

Posted November 3, 2021

Supplied Photo:  Jamie Andrews
Jamie Andrews of Fountain City is one of this year's Lingle Scholar Program Award recipients.

Jamie Andrews of Fountain City, Indiana, and Alison Juday of Richmond, Indiana, are the 2021 recipients of the Paul and Pat Lingle Scholars Program. The scholarship award will continue throughout their pursuit of a four-year degree at Indiana University East.

Both are members of IU East's incoming freshmen Class of 2025.

Andrews is an exploratory major in her first year at IU East.

"Receiving this award means a lot to me because it will allow me to worry about my academics more and less about paying off my loan. I know that I will also be able to push myself more to do better in my classes so that I can succeed and actually keep the award," Andrews said.

Andrews chose IU East because the campus is close to her home and offers an affordable IU degree. "I also like that it is a smaller college so I am able to get more one-on-one time with my professors if need be," Andrews said. "I chose to be an exploratory major because it will allow me to test out several different classes to see which peek my interest the most before deciding which field I actually want to pursue. It also will allow me to get my pre-requisites done with before I have to choose what I want to do for the rest of my life. Since I am an exploratory major I am not quite sure what I am hoping to do after I graduate, but that is the beauty of being in exploratory; I don't have to plan my life right away."

While in high school at Northeastern Andrews was a member of the women's basketball team and the track and field team. She was part of the marching band, jazz band, and concert band, and she was a member of the National Honors Society and the Gay Straight Alliance (GSA).

Supplied Photo:  Alison Juday
Alison Juday of Richmond, Indiana, is a 2021 Lingle Scholar award recipient.

Andrews also works for the Campus Bookstore at IU East.

When the phone call came for Juday that she was going to be a Lingle Scholar, she almost didn't answer her phone. Now into her first semester, the biology major and member of the Red Wolves volleyball team is glad she answered.

"To me, receiving the Lingle Scholar Award means that I have challenged myself to take rigorous classes in high school to push myself to be better in school so that I would be able to succeed even more in college and life," Juday said.

Juday is a second-generation IU East student. Both of her parents received their business degrees with concentrations in accounting from IU East. Her mother, Stephanie Juday, is a 1997 graduate, and her father, Matt Juday, is a 2013 graduate.

Located in her hometown, IU East appealed to Juday just as it did to Andrews. It's located right here in Richmond and offers a high-quality IU degree at an affordable cost.

Her experience at Richmond High School led to her decision to pursue a biology degree. Juday said she really enjoyed learning about science. She hopes to go to medical school and to one day become a psychiatrist.

While at RHS, Juday was a member of the volleyball team and softball team. She was also a member of the Science Academic Team.

The Paul and Pat Lingle Scholars Program award is given to two students who have been accepted into the IU East Honors Program, an academic program that provides an intellectually enriching curriculum for highly motivated students. Recipients receive a four-year scholarship, provided by the Lingles.

The Lingle Scholars program was established in 2005 and formally endowed in 2018. The program has assisted 16 students achieve their goal of earning a bachelor's degree, including the most recent graduates from the program, Destiny Maitlen of Centerville and Mackenzie Spurrier of Richmond. This year Andrews and Juday join Vincent Narcisse of Richmond, Sidne Thompson of Centerville, Sam Roberts of Centerville, Noah Fox of Richmond and Alexia Mills of Richmond as Paul & Pat Lingle Scholars at IU East.

Governor Holcomb and Indiana Department of Transportation Award More Than $100 Million Through Community Crossings

Posted November 3, 2021

Franklin, Ind. – Governor Eric J. Holcomb and Indiana Department of Transportation Commissioner Joe McGuinness today announced 218 Indiana cities, towns, and counties received a combined $101.9 million in state matching funds for local road projects through Community Crossings, a component of the Governor's Next Level Roads program.

"Community Crossings continues to have a transformative effect on communities across Indiana" Governor Holcomb said. "The partnership between the state and local governments is empowering Hoosier cities, towns and counties to invest more and take on bigger projects than ever before to modernize their local transportation systems to meet the demand of our growing economy."

The Community Crossings initiative has provided more than $1 billion in state matching funds for local construction projects since 2016. Communities submitted applications for funding during a highly competitive call for projects held in January. Applications were evaluated based on need and current conditions and impacts to safety and economic development. Funding for Community Crossings comes from the state's local road and bridge matching grant fund.

"Community Crossings is one of the most important tools available to our local partners to support their efforts to improve local roads and bridges," INDOT Commissioner Joe McGuinness said. "Rebuilding and improving local roads, while also addressing safety needs, promotes growth and enhances the business environment and quality of place across Indiana."

To qualify for funding, local governments must provide local matching funds, 50 percent for larger communities or 25 percent for smaller communities, from a funding source approved for road and bridge construction. They must also submit an INDOT-approved asset management plan for maintaining existing roads and bridges. State law requires annually that 50 percent of the available matching funds be awarded to communities within counties with a population of 50,000 or fewer. State lawmakers identified long-term funding for Community Crossings as part of House Enrolled Act 1002, passed by the legislature and signed into law by Gov. Holcomb in April 2017.

The list of all communities receiving matching funds in the 2021 summer/fall call for projects is online at www.in.gov/indot/communitycrossings.

The next call for projects in Community Crossings will open in January 2022.

IU East Mourns the Passing of Professor Emerita Jane Vincent

Posted November 3, 2021

Supplied Photo:  Jane Vincent
Jane Vincent

Professor Emerita of Nursing Jane Vincent, Ed.D., R.N., passed away on Tuesday, October 26, at Reid Health. Vincent was the example of servant leadership, earning local and state recognition for her leadership in nursing education.

She was passionate about being a nurse and that passion carried through to serving others through teaching, mentorship, and philanthropy.

IU East Chancellor Kathy Girten remembered Vincent for the impact she had on campus and the community.

"Jane's contributions to IU East are wide ranging. She had a great passion for teaching and nursing. This passion continues to benefit our campus and community yet today --- and it will for years to come," Girten said.

In the community, Vincent was the first woman to serve on the Reid Hospital Foundation Board of Directors. She completed three terms, one as the board president and one as chair.

She also wanted to encourage the quality of life for families and caregivers of Alzheimer's patients. Vincent organized and facilitated the first Alzheimer's support group in the state, a commitment she maintained for over 20 years.

As a teacher, Vincent educated and mentored thousands of nurses throughout her 35 years. While part of the IU East School of Nursing and Health Sciences faculty, she taught graduate level courses online. She taught at IU East from 1980 to 2000, initially joining the faculty as an assistant professor. Vincent worked with nursing students to overcome various obstacles during their education, and she was a mentor who cared about the future of her students. She also taught at Ivy Tech and was the assistant director of education for Richmond State Hospital.

Karen Clark, dean of the School of Nursing and Health Sciences, said Vincent was a treasure to the campus and nursing.

"Jane's commitment to nursing education and the nursing profession was unwavering," Clark said. "She advocated for her students and our programs, first as a faculty member, as director of the A.S.N. program, and through her service on the School of Nursing and Health Sciences Advisory Committee. She was an exemplary role model for those of us in the nursing community. She will be missed greatly."

In her retirement, Vincent remained an active member of the IU East campus community and attended events such as the Nursing Gala, Retired Faculty Breakfast and the Spirit of Philanthropy.

Vincent received various recognitions for teaching and service. She received the 1992 Educator of the year Award from the Richmond Chamber of Commerce. Teaching awards include the Distinguished Public Service Award from the IU Council of Nursing Faculty in 1997; the Teaching Excellence Recognition (TERA) 1997 and 1999 from IU East; the 2000 Distinguished Service Award from the IU School of Nursing Alumni Association; a Faculty Colloquium on Excellence in Teaching (FACET) Award in 1998; IU East Helen Lees Award; a Teaching Excellence Recognition Award; The Lifetime Achievement in Nursing Award in 2002 from IU East Nursing Faculty; the State of Indiana Sagamore of the Wabash distinction in 2002; and the IU East Chancellor's Medallion in 2014.

"I was pleased to recognize Jane with the Chancellor's Medallion award," Girten said. "Jane was so welcoming to me when I arrived in Richmond and she always took an interest in our students, programs and activities. Her support ranged from nursing to the arts and her presence will be greatly missed."

As a 1953 Richmond High School graduate, Vincent received a Distinguished Alumni Award from the RHS Alumni Association in 2002. She was a lifetime member of the association.

Vincent and her late husband, Wayne Vincent, were long-time stewards to IU and the state of Indiana. Wayne passed away in December 2017. As stewards to IU, the Vincents supported the arts and nursing programs on IU campuses including the Herron School of Art and Design, the Jacobs School of Music, the IU and IU East School of Nursing and Health Sciences, and IU East's annual Whitewater Valley Arts Competition.

The Vincents were inducted into the Indiana University Presidents Circle in October 2018.

Vincent received her Bachelor of Science in Nursing in 1957 and her Master of Science in Nursing in 1980, both from IUPUI. She earned her Ed.D. from Ball State University in 1991 while transitioning her invaluable experience in nursing to develop and forward the nursing program at IU East. More information about Vincent's meaningful contributions to IU East can be found at https://www.iue.edu/tribute/.

Services for Vincent will be at 1 p.m. on Saturday, November 20, at First English Lutheran Church, 2727 E. Main Street in Richmond. A reception will follow. In lieu of flowers, the family requests memorial contributions to the IU East Nursing Fund, c/o IU East Office of Gift Development or to First English Lutheran Church.

Kelley School's 2022 Business Outlook Forecast Presentation for Wayne County Is November 10

Posted October 29, 2021

Area business leaders and community members are invited to attend the Indiana University's Kelley School of Business Outlook forecast for 2022.

The presentation begins at 7:30 a.m. on Wednesday, November 10, in Whitewater Hall Lobby. The event begins with a networking breakfast followed by the Business Outlook Panel from 8-9 a.m. in Vivian Auditorium. Register online at Eventbrite. The event is free and open to the public. Parking for visitors will be available in the Whitewater Hall parking lot.

The Business Outlook forecast is sponsored by the Kelley School of Business, the Kelley School of Business Alumni Association, the IU East School of Business and Economics, and the IU Alumni Association East Region.

The IU Kelley School of Business will present its economic forecasts for the nation, financial markets, Indiana and communities across the state.

Since 1972, Kelley School faculty have presented their annual Business Outlook forecast around the state, usually joined by a local panelist. While the panel will not physically travel across the state, the school and its Indiana Business Research Center is hosting 10 regional events. The forecast is based on research from the Indiana Business Research Center, which has provided crucial economic information needed by many Indiana businesses, government units and nonprofit organizations since 1925.

At each presentation, the panel features faculty members from the Kelley School and IU, plus local panelists from other IU campuses and other universities, offering perspectives on the global, national, state and local economies and financial markets.

There will also be a Q&A session to answer attendee questions.

This year's panel for Richmond's forecast includes:

  • Jason Troutwine, Vice Chancellor of External Affairs at IU East, moderator
  • Kyle Anderson, Clinical Assistant Professor of Business Economics at the Kelley School of Business in Indianapolis, national and international panelist
  • Ryan Brewer, Associate Professor of Finance, Division of Business, IUPUC, state panelist
  • Russell Rhoads, Associate Clinical Professor of Financial Management, Kelley School of Business, Indiana University, financial markets panelist
  • Oi Lin Cheung, Associate Professor of Finance and Director of the Business and Economic Research Center for the IU East School of Business and Economics, local panelist

The forecast is sponsored by IU's Kelley School of Business, the Kelley School of Business Alumni Association, the IU Alumni Association, IU campuses and numerous community organizations.

For more information, contact Terry Wiesehan, director of Alumni Relations and Campus Events, at (765) 973-8221 or twiesaha@iue.edu.

Moderna Available at Reid's Main COVID-19 Vaccination Sites

Posted October 29, 2021

Anyone looking to get a booster shot of Moderna's COVID-19 vaccine can do so at either of Reid Health's main vaccination locations.

Both the vaccination clinic at Reid Plaza at 2300 National Road W. in Richmond and the clinic on the main concourse of Reid Health Hospital have the Moderna and Pfizer products available. Those who would like to receive the Johnson & Johnson vaccine can go to the hospital site for it.

Federal health officials last week expanded eligibility for COVID-19 booster shot vaccinations, allowing extra doses for those who previously had received the Moderna or Johnson & Johnson vaccines as well as allowing for a mix-and-match approach. All those eligible for a booster shot now can choose whichever vaccine they would like for that extra dose.

The guidelines for booster shots vary depending on which vaccine you initially received. Eligibility is the same for Pfizer and Moderna but differs for Johnson & Johnson.

Pfizer and Moderna

Those eligible for a booster dose at least six months after their second shot include:

  • Anyone 65 years and older;
  • Those 18 years and older who have underlying medical conditions such as cancer; chronic kidney, liver, lung, or heart conditions; diabetes; pregnancy; obesity; HIV; and more;
  • Those 18 and older who work in high-risk settings such as first responders (healthcare workers, firefighters, police), long-term care, education (teachers, support staff, daycare workers), food and agriculture, manufacturing, prisons and jails, public transit, U.S Postal Service, and grocery stores;
  • Those 18 and older who live in long-term care or high-risk settings.

Johnson & Johnson

The guidelines for Johnson & Johnson are much simpler:

  • Anyone 18 and older who was vaccinated at least two months ago can now get a booster dose.

Those who are moderately to severely immunocompromised also are eligible for an extra dose of the two-shot Pfizer or Moderna vaccine. That third dose should come at least 28 days after the second.

In addition to Reid's clinics, the FREE vaccinations are available at a number of other nearby locations. Indiana residents can find sites and sign up for an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.

October 29th's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 25
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 21 (84%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 9
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 8 (88.9%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 6
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 5 (83.3%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 157
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 24 (15.3% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 17

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

LifeStream Providing SHIP Counseling During Open Enrollment

Posted October 28, 2021

LifeStream Services has trained State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP) counselors on staff to help navigate the complexities of healthcare during the Open Enrollment period which ends on December 7. SHIP provides free, impartial health insurance information and is not affiliated with any insurance company.

SHIP can help answer questions on Medicare, Medicare Supplemental Insurance, Medicare Advantage, Medicaid, long-term care insurance, prescription drug coverage, and low income assistance. The goal of this program is to help the beneficiary make well-informed decisions regarding their health care and get the most value for their health insurance dollars.

LifeStream is hosting virtual and special community events to help those in need during Open Enrollment.

  • SHIP Question and Answer Virtual Session on October 27 from noon to 1:00pm and again from 6:00pm to 7:00pm. A SHIP Counselor will provide a short presentation with general information and will be available to answer general questions. No personal information will be discussed during the presentation. Join the noon session at bit.ly/SHIPInfoSession1 or the 6pm session at bit.ly/SHIPInfoSession2.
  • SHIP Community Event on Tuesday, November 16 from 8:00am to 3:00pm at the Farmland Senior Center located at 100 N. Main St. Farmland, IN 47340. Appointments are required at this location. Please call 800-589-1121 to schedule.
  • SHIP Community Event on Monday, November 29 from 8:00am to 3:00pm at IU Health Jay Hospital located at 500 W. Votaw St. Portland, IN 47371. Appointments are required at this location. Please call 800-589-1121 to schedule.

In-person appointments can be scheduled at the Yorktown, Richmond, and Pendleton LifeStream offices by calling 800-589-1121. SHIP Counselors are also available via phone at 800-589-1121 to help answer questions and review current plans. This program is available to anyone in Blackford, Delaware, Fayette, Franklin, Grant, Henry, Jay, Madison, Randolph, Rush, Union and Wayne counties. Visit lifestreaminc.org or call 800-589-1121 to learn more.

2021 Girls Inc. Signature Event to be Held on November 13th

Posted September 22, 2021

Supplied Image: Girl in Cape

Girls Inc. of Wayne County invites you to the 2021 Girls Inc. Signature Event on Saturday, November 13, 2021 at 6:00 p.m. at the Forest Hills Country Club, 6139 South 23rd Street, Richmond, IN 47374.

The event will honor:

  • Ann Brooks: 20 plus years at Harrington Hoch
  • Becky Jewison: Retired from Reid after 10 years
  • Ella Watson: 11 year old Studen and Girls Inc. member

Tickets are $75 each. Cocktail attire.

Purchase a tribute ad to honor someone who you see as a hero or to Congratulate the honorees.

For Tribute details, please RSVP to msoper@girlsincwayne.org by October 25th.

Medical Monday Will Celebrate Milestone Anniversary in November

Posted October 28, 2021

Supplied Photo:  Samuel Iden
Samuel Iden, MD, Reid Health Emergency Medicine

November's edition of Medical Monday will include a special celebration of the event's 10th anniversary.

Sharrie Harlin Davis started Medical Monday when she was working for the Minority Health Coalition and maintained it after joining Reid Health with the support of Reid Health Community Benefit.

The event has built a loyal following, averaging 40 to 50 guests each month to learn about various health issues, community programs, and health screenings. It has made a difference in the lives of attendees, including giving one the information she needed to determine she was having a stroke and make sure she received the proper, lifesaving care.

Next month's edition will feature Reid Health Emergency Medicine's Samuel Iden, MD, with a presentation about respiratory illness.

The free event will begin at 1 p.m. Monday, Nov. 8 at Central United Methodist Church, 1425 E. Main St. in Richmond. To register, call Harlin Davis at (765) 983-3000, ext. 4676. Masks are required to attend.

COVID-19 Vaccine Booster Shot Eligibility Expanded to All 3 Vaccines

Posted October 28, 2021

Federal health officials have expanded eligibility for COVID-19 booster shot vaccinations, allowing extra doses for those who previously had received the Moderna or Johnson & Johnson vaccines as well as allowing for a mix-and-match approach.

The guidelines for booster shots approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) vary depending on which vaccine you initially received. Eligibility is the same for the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines but differs for Johnson & Johnson.

Pfizer and Moderna

Those eligible for a booster dose include:

  • Anyone 65 years and older;
  • Those 18 years and older who have underlying medical conditions such as cancer; chronic kidney, liver, lung, or heart conditions; diabetes; pregnancy; obesity; HIV; and more;
  • Those 18 and older who work in high-risk settings such as first responders (healthcare workers, firefighters, police), long-term care, education (teachers, support staff, daycare workers), food and agriculture, manufacturing, prisons and jails, public transit, U.S Postal Service, and grocery stores;
  • Those 18 and older who live in long-term care or high-risk settings.

Johnson & Johnson

The guidelines for Johnson & Johnson are much simpler:

  • Anyone 18 and older who was vaccinated at least two months ago can now get a booster dose.
  • FDA and CDC also have approved a mix-and-match approach to vaccinations, allowing all those eligible to get a booster shot to choose whichever vaccine they would like for that extra dose.

Studies have suggested protection against infection and mild illness given by the COVID-19 vaccines may decrease over time, although the vaccines continue to perform very well in preventing severe illness and death. Data has shown booster shots increase a person's immune response, helping their bodies to better prevent infection.

Those who are moderately to severely immunocompromised previously had been given approval for an extra dose of the two-shot Pfizer or Moderna vaccine. That third dose should come at least 28 days after the second.

The CDC recommends people talk with their healthcare provider about their particular medical condition and whether an additional vaccine dose is appropriate for them.

FREE vaccinations are available at a number of nearby locations. Indiana residents can find sites and sign up for an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.

October 22nd's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 31
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 25 (80.6%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 8
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 8 (100%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 6
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 6 (100%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 236
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 24 (10.2% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 17

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Monoclonal Antibody Infusions for COVID-19 Need to Be Received in Illness's First Days

Posted October 28, 2021

In the search for effective treatments for COVID-19, monoclonal antibody infusions have proven to make a dramatic difference in the risk of being hospitalized for the illness, but it's important not to wait before asking your provider about the treatment.

For those who qualify, monoclonal antibodies can be used to treat mild to moderate symptoms of COVID-19. Treatment can be provided up to 10 days after the onset of symptoms, but it's most effective when administered within no more than four days.

Monoclonal antibodies are a treatment designed to help your immune system fight viruses. The U.S. Food & Drug Administration has given Emergency Use Authorization for their use in adults and children who are at least 12 years of age, who weigh at least 88 pounds, and who are at high risk for severe COVID-19.

Under the EUA, being high risk means meeting at least one of the following criteria:

  • Being at least 65 years old,
  • Having a body mass index (BMI) of at least 35,
  • Being pregnant,
  • Having chronic kidney disease,
  • Having diabetes,
  • Having an immunosuppressive disease,
  • Currently receiving an immunosuppressive treatment,
  • Having cardiovascular disease or hypertension,
  • Having chronic lung diseases,
  • Having sickle cell disease,
  • Having neurodevelopmental disorders or conditions that require ongoing specialized care, or
  • Having a medical-related technological dependence (for example, tracheostomy, gastrostomy, or positive pressure ventilation).

If you meet the criteria for a monoclonal antibody infusion, don't wait until you feel poorly to talk with your physician. Once you qualify for hospital admission, you no longer meet the requirements for monoclonal antibody treatment.

Reid has set up a temporary clinic for its infusions at Reid Plaza in Richmond, just two doors down from the Reid Health PACE Center at 2300 National Road W.

Patients need a physician's referral to get an appointment. If you do not have a primary care provider or it's the weekend, call Reid's COVID-19 Hotline at (765) 965-4200 for help. The hotline is available 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a week. Hotline staff also can help with scheduling COVID-19 testing, getting test results, or with clinical advice.

October 26th's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 34
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 28 (82.4%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 10
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 10 (100%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 8
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 8 (100%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: N/A
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 23
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 12

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

IU President Whitten's Inauguration Watch Party at IU East

Posted October 22, 2021

Supplied Photo:  IU President Pamela Whitten
IU's 19th President Pamela Whitten will be inaugurated on November 4.
Photo by Indiana University

Indiana University East welcomes the community to participate in a watch party and celebration of the inauguration of its first female president, Pamela Whitten, Indiana University's 19th president.

  • WHAT: Autumn Festival and 19th IU President Pamela Whitten Inauguration Watch Party
  • WHEN: Thursday, November 4, 2021, at 2:30 p.m. The inauguration procession begins at 2:45 p.m. and the ceremony begins at 3 p.m.
  • WHO: IU and IU East alumni, faculty, staff, students, community, and members of the media are welcome to attend.
  • WHERE: Indiana University East, 2325 Chester Blvd., Richmond, Indiana. The event will take place in the Whitewater Hall Lobby. Visitor parking is available in the Whitewater Hall parking lot.
  • ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: IU President Pamela Whitten was named the 19th IU President on April 16, 2021, by the IU Board of Trustees. She officially began July 1, 2021.

Whitten, a visionary scholar and accomplished educator and researcher, will be the first female president for IU. She will oversee one of the nation's leading research universities at a time of record-level research funding and philanthropic support.

She first visited the IU East campus as president-elect on April 27.

Whitten holds a Ph.D. in communication studies from the University of Kansas, a Master of Arts in communication from the University of Kentucky and a Bachelor of Science in management from Tulane University. She is an internationally recognized expert in the field of telemedicine. As part of her work in higher education, she additionally held leadership roles at the University of Georgia and the University of Kansas Medical Center.

For more information on IU President Whitten, visit iu.edu/about/leadership/president/index.html.

EverHeart Hospice Celebrates 40th Anniversary

Posted October 22, 2021

Supplied Photo: Everheart Hospice Staff Celebrates 40th Anniversary

EverHeart Hospice, formerly State of the Heart Care, is excited to be celebrating 40 years of caring for patients and families in the community.

In 1980, a small group of community members and healthcare professionals met to discuss the idea of starting a hospice program to serve patients facing a life-limiting illness. At the time, there was no such program available for local communities in a rural setting. This idea became a reality in January of 1981, with the official start of Hospice of Darke County, Inc. A total of 27 patients received care during that first year. Forty years later, we have now had the privilege of serving over 16,800 patients during their end-of-life journey.

Mary Sue Rosenberger was the first person employed by Hospice of Darke County, Inc., serving as Chief Executive Officer from 1981-1985. In a previous interview celebrating our 20 th Anniversary, Mary shared her thoughts on bringing a hospice program to the area, stating she knew the impact of the need for hospice care in the community was evident "when I visited my first patient. I knew then that this was an essential, meaningful service." Sadly, Mary has since passed away in 2020, but her legacy as one of the founding members and her passion for hospice care remains today.

Many aspects of the agency have grown and evolved over the years, from expanding office space from only two rooms in the basement of the Brethren Retirement Community in 1981, to currently having three offices located in Greenville and Coldwater, OH; Winchester, Indiana; and the EverHeart Hospice Care Center located on the fourth floor of Wayne HealthCare. Even through this growth, it is safe to say that the agency's mission, vision, and values have always remained deeply rooted and consistent. We are proud of our focus on our core values: Patient and Family-Centered, Compassion, Excellence, Integrity, and Community-Focused.

Over the years, when reflecting on her involvement with EverHeart Hospice since the very beginning, Joy Marchal, who served as the first Board President, second Chief Executive Officer for twelve years, and former volunteer after her retirement, previously shared, "There were mountains to climb and great challenges, but through it all we were able to make a significant difference for patients and families."

With the continuous hard work and dedication of our staff, volunteers, Board members, and generous community support, today we are proud to serve a total of 12 counties in west-central Ohio and east-central Indiana, including Darke, Miami, Preble, Shelby, Mercer, Auglaize, Allen, Van Wert, and Paulding counties in Ohio and Jay, Randolph, and Wayne counties in Indiana.

Kristi Strawser, current Chief Executive Officer since 2018, has been a part of the agency for many years serving in various roles prior including RN, Hospice Care Center Manager, and Chief Clinical Officer. "We are so very thankful for those who laid the foundation and advocated 40 years ago to introduce the concept of Hospice and the value of this service to our communities. We are honored to be continuing the mission of the organization. Our mission has been our focus for the past four decades, and we will continue ensuring that mission is our focus for decades to come."

Join us over the next 40 days as we reflect on the past 40 years, sharing the history and stories behind the roots of our organization. You can follow along on our website, www.everhearthospice.org, our Facebook page, and local media outlets.

We are proud to be your local non-profit hospice. When asked what the next 40 years may look like, Kristi shared, "We will continue ensuring our communities have access to exceptional hospice care to ensure those who are at this crucial part of their journey can experience quality of life and comfort. We will honor their life with trusted care."

IU East Announces 43rd Annual Whitewater Valley Art Competition Awards, Entrants

Posted October 19, 2021

Supplied Photo:  Benjamin Duke of East Lansing, Michigan, is the first-place winner of the 43rd Whitewater Valley Art Competition for his oil painting, Vicarious Causation.
Benjamin Duke of East Lansing, Michigan, is the first-place winner of the 43rd Whitewater Valley Art Competition for his oil painting, Vicarious Causation.

Jurors called the entries for this year's annual Whitewater Valley Art Competition (WVAC) thought provoking with a depth of talent and wide-range of mediums to immerse viewers into thought and discussion.

Originating in 1978 with open judging, the WVAC has hosted prestigious artists and art experts of national acclaim for the jurying.

Jurying for the 43rd WVAC was held on IU East Facebook Live on September 24.

Artwork was selected by this year's jurors Brigham Dimick, chair and professor for the Department of Art and Design at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville; Marcella Hackbardt, professor of Studio Art at Kenyon College; and Cathy Mayhugh, director of Exhibitions at the Fitton Center for Creative Arts.

Jurors selected the awards and entries for the WVAC announced during a reception on October 15.

Sixty-Six artists living in Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky, Michigan, and Ohio, working in a wide range of mediums including painting, drawing, ceramics, printmaking, fibers, sculpture, photography, and metalsmithing submitted 239 images featuring 193 works of art. After hours of individual review by jurors, Brigham Dimick, Cathy Mayhugh, and Marcella Hackbardt they selected 55 works of art created by forty-two artists for the final exhibition.

The 43rd Whitewater Valley Art exhibit is on display now through December 10 at in the Tom Thomas gallery and Meijer Artway, both located in Whitewater Hall.

The exhibition is presented by First Bank Richmond.

About the Jurors

Hackbardt is a visual artist, curator, and educator living in central Ohio. She is a professor of studio art at Kenyon College in Gambier, Ohio. Her current work explores aspects of knowledge, self-reflection, the environment, and symbolic states. She received her M.F.A. in studio art/photography from the University Mexico, Albuquerque, and a B.A. in studio art from the University of Alaska Anchorage. Her work has been included in exhibitions at The Girl's Club Collection in Fort Lauderdale, Station Independent Projects in New York, Cleveland's Museum of Contemporary Art, and at The University of Notre Dame, among others.

Hackbardt has received recognition and support for her work from OAC Individual Excellence Grants, Kenyon College Faculty grants, the Midwest Society for Photographic Educators, and the Great Lakes Colleges Association.

"All of the works submitted sought to make meaning and challenge the viewer, and provided an exciting several hours of absorbing and discussing the rich messages and materiality of all of the entries, whether included in the final selection or not," Hackbardt said. "As a juror, I seek to recognize works that exhibit aesthetic, technical, and conceptual expertise--or that succeed and exceed in even one of these areas in a powerful way. My co-jurors also took time to reflect on each work, and through our discussions helped illuminate for me new ways of seeing and receiving the artworks, enriching my experience even further."

Dimick studied at the Barnstone Studios, a privately run atelier, as a teenager where he developed a portfolio that helped him earn a four-year scholarship to Tyler School of Art, where Dimick received a B.F.A. in painting. Before going to Indiana University for an M.F.A. in painting, Brigham spent four years hitchhiking across the country, living in northern California, traveling in Mexico, painting houses, and drawing.

His teaching career includes four years each at the Savannah College of Art and Design and the University of Pennyslvania, as well as years as a part-timer at Moore College of Art and St. Joseph's University. Since 2002, Brigham continues as the Drawing program head at SIUE and currently serves as chair of the department of Art and Design.

Some of his drawings are in the corporate collections of Morgan Stanley and Fische & Richardson, and in the university collections of Lamar University, Emporia State, and St. Ambrose University.

Dimick said the quality and breadth of submitted works were substantial and allowed the jurors to arrive at an exhibition that represents a wide range of sensibilities, technical processes, social and conceptual concerns while maintaining a satisfyingly high standard.

"As a juror, I try to see beyond my personal tastes and approach each artwork on its own terms. Hence, the question is not whether I like the work, but whether it is compelling on the terms the artist set, and whether the work is bold enough to go beyond the familiar while exhibiting a command of visual syntax," Dimick said. "I found myself most drawn to work in which an artist's range of entries reinforced their underlying concerns foundational to their creative practice. A common denominator of these impactful artists was the balancing act of making each work a fresh adventure while ensuring that the collective impact of their portfolio reveals a larger and enduring focus."

Mayhugh has been the Director of Exhibitions at the Fitton Center for Creative Arts in Hamilton, Ohio, since 2000. In this role she curates, designs, coordinates and installs a wide range of exhibitions of visual art. She also leads gallery talks, creates community collaborative projects and serves on Hamilton's StreetSpark Mural Selection Committee. After years of collaborating with other artists to present their work, she is reemerging as an art maker herself.

Mayhugh holds a B.F.A. in Painting from Miami University and a Graduate Certificate in Museum Studies from the University of Cincinnati, DAAP.

"A diversity of artistic materials and processes and obvious abundant talent made judging this regional exhibition both a challenge and a joy," Mayhugh said. "Brigham, Marcella and I agreed that we wanted to select and award artworks that would strongly represent the range of media we encountered and include both abstract and representational content."

IU East's 43rd Annual Whitewater Valley Art Competition Top Entrants

First Place ($2,000 award and a 2022 IU East galleries solo exhibition invitation)

  • Benjamin Duke, East Lansing, Michigan - Vicarious Causation, oil

Second Place

  • John Humphries, Cincinnati, Ohio - Calvino's Ten Forgotten Cities, cut paper, pencil

Third Place

  • Charles Mintz, Cleveland, Ohio - "The Flower Man" Evansville, IN, inkjet print from scanned film

Honorable Mention

  • Steve Loar, East Grand Rapids, Michigan - Inner Vistas # 2, found and gifted materials, mostly wood
  • Devan Horton, Bellevue, Kentucky - Wade, oil on canvas
  • Sam Kelly, Dayton, Ohio - Two Figures and the Muybridge Horse, charcoal, paper collage on paper

Chancellor's Choice Purchase Award (IU East Campus Art Collection)

Nathan Taves, Columbia City, Indiana - Pasture Canyons, oil on panel

In addition to the award winners, work from the following artists is included in this exhibition:

Shelby Alexander, Cincinnati, Ohio; Abby Beneke, West Alexandria, Ohio; Walt Bistline, Richmond, Indiana; Gregory Bryant, Lafayette, Indiana; Susan Carlson, Cincinnati, Ohio; Hector Del Campo, Westfield, Indiana; Casey Dressel, Cincinnati, Ohio; Claire Fullam, Indianapolis, Indiana; Carl Gay, Richmond, Indiana; Nicholas Hill, Granville, Ohio; Angie Hubbard, Alexandria, Kentucky; Ann Johnson, Muncie, Indiana; Erica Keener, West Alexandria, Ohio; Colleen Kelsey, Oakwood, Ohio; Amy Kollar Anderson, Dayton, Ohio; Michael Lorsung, Muncie, Indiana; Josh Lovitt, Richmond, Indiana; Steven C. Meyer, Porter, Indiana; Rob Millard-Mendez, Evansville, Indiana; Kathy A. Moore, Casstown, Ohio; Paloma Nunez-Regueiro, Ann Arbor, Michigan; Jim Pearson, Lawrenceville, Illinois; Kate Santucci, Dayton, Ohio; Francis Schanberger, Dayton, Ohio; Constance Scopelitis, Indianapolis, Indiana; Neil Simak, College Corner, Ohio; Barb Stahl, Indianapolis, Indiana; Joseph Swanson, Richmond, Indiana; Nancy Taylor, Richmond, Indiana; Jerry D. Thompson, Richmond, Indiana; Barbara Triscari, Lebanon, Indiana; Mark Van Buskirk, Richmond, Indiana; Cass Waters, Chicago, Illinois; and Clinton Wood, Cincinnati, Ohio.

IU East's School of Business and Economics Business Speaker Series begins October 20

Posted October 19, 2021

Indiana University East's School of Business and Economics Business Speaker Series will begin at 11 a.m. on Wednesday, October 20, in Vivian Auditorium. The presentation is free and open to the public.

The Business Speaker Series is sponsored by the Charles Koch Foundation. Co-sponsored by Delta Mu Delta, IU East Center for Economic Education, and the IU East Business and Economic Research Center.

Supplied Photo:  Sean Mulholland
Sean Mulholland
The first speaker this fall is Sean Mulholland, professor of economics at Western Carolina University in Cullowhee, North Carolina.

Mulholland's presentation is "Test-Optional Admissions and Student Debt."

Applicants who forgo submitting standardized test scores signal that they have fewer enrollment options. Facing fewer competitors, test-optional schools can charge more. They find that private school graduates admitted under a test-optional policy borrow $1,410 (2016) more than those required to submit their scores. This amount represents about 5 percent of the average debt of bachelor's degree holders.

As the number of test-optional schools have increased, each successive post-switching graduating class borrows less. They also show that the share of graduates with debt drops after the switch to test-optional admissions but rises as the number of test-optional competitors increases.

Mulholland has published research articles on a wide variety of topics, including human capital and economic growth, white supremacist groups and hate crimes, school competition and student performance, and Uber and drunk driving. His research has appeared in many journals, including the Journal of Economic Growth, Public Choice, Economics Letters, and Economics of Education Review. His co-authored paper, "Ride-Sharing, Fatal Crashes, and Crime" was awarded the Georgescu-Roegen Prize for the best academic article published in the Southern Economic Journal in 2018. His work has been covered by Ballotpedia, Politifact, National Review, and Tyler Cowen on marginalrevolution.com.

He was awarded the 2018-2019 College of Business Faculty Excellence Award, the 2017-2018 Honors College Board of Directors Faculty Excellence Award, and the 2017-2018 College of Business Excellence in Research Award. He has held faculty positions at Boston College, Stonehill College, and Mercer University. Mulholland has guided more than a dozen undergraduate research projects. He has served as a faculty mentor at seminars sponsored by the Institute for Humane Studies (IHS) and the Foundation for Economic Education (FEE) and led discussions at the Center for Excellence in Education's Research Science Institute at MIT.

Born and raised in Anderson, South Carolina, Mulholland earned his M.A. and Ph.D. from Clemson University. He lives in Franklin, North Carolina with his wife, Western Carolina University economist Angela K. Dills, and their three children.

Supplied Photo:  Percy Menzies
Percy Menzies

The Business Speaker Series will present its second speaker, Percy Menzies, president of assisted Recovery Centers of America, at 10:15 a.m. on Wednesday, November 10, in Vivian Auditorium. This lecture is co-sponsored with the IU East School of Nursing and Health Sciences.

Menzies will present "Treating the Addicted Brain: Advances in the Treatment of Addictive Disorders."

The treatment of addictive disorders, especially alcoholism and opioid addiction has a dark history of using medications, devices and surgeries that did more harm than good. This was primarily due to the lack of understanding of the neurobiology of addiction and failure to understand the reciprocity of using addicting drugs as cures. The result of this dark history is a mistrust of science and medicine and the dominance of self-help groups in the treatment of addictive disorders.

The advances in the understanding of neurobiology and behavioral sciences have led to the development of newer medications and therapies which will bring treatment in line with other chronic conditions like diabetes and hypertension.

The Assisted Recovery Centers of America, LLC, is a center for the treatment of alcoholism and drug addiction based in St. Louis, Missouri which was established in 2001.

Menzies' interest and passion for pharmacological treatment of drug addiction and alcoholism goes back to the early eighties when naltrexone was first introduced for the treatment of heroin addiction. He worked for over 18 years for DuPont Pharmaceuticals in various positions and had responsibility for naltrexone as the associate product director.

Menzies has worked closely with drugs courts and provided training on the use of anticraving medications to reduce recidivism within the criminal justice population addicted to alcohol and opioids. He has conducted workshops for a wide range of audiences both in the U.S. and overseas on evidenced-based treatments for addictive disorders.

He has been invited to serve on expert committees to develop guidelines for the treatment of addictive disorders and alcoholism. He has been invited to serve on advisory boards both in the private and government sectors.

Menzies holds a master's degree in pharmacy from India. Menzies immigrated to the United States in 1977.

Doctors Will Be Back to Answer COVID-19 Questions Thursday Night

Posted October 19, 2021

There's been quite a bit of news recently around COVID-19 vaccinations and booster shots, so Whitewater Community Television once again is offering a chance for you to get your questions answered by local experts live Thursday evening.

WCTV's "IN Focus" program will feature Thomas Huth, M.D., Vice President of Medical Affairs for Reid Health; David Jetmore, M.D., Wayne County Health Officer; and Paul Rider, M.D., Wayne County Health Board President at 6 p.m. Thursday.

Huth and Jetmore were the featured guests of WCTV's "Ask the Doctors" program that ran for some 65 weeks from the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic through the middle of June. The duo has been featured on "IN Focus" three times since "Ask the Doctors" ended, most recently on Sept. 23.

If you have a question you'd like to have answered during the program, it can be emailed to WCTV at WCTV@iue.edu by 4 p.m. Thursday. During the show, questions can be posed by asking on the WCTV Facebook page or by sending them via Twitter to @WCTVinfo.

"IN Focus" airs Thursdays at 6 p.m. on WGTV, Channel 11 on Comcast cable in Wayne County. Those who live outside Wayne County or who don't have Comcast can watch the show live on WCTV's Facebook page as well as on WGTV Online.

Replays can be seen on WGTV, Channel 11, Thursday at 10:30 p.m., Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 8 a.m. and 9 p.m., and Sunday at 8 a.m. and 1 p.m. Audio-only replays can be heard Sunday mornings on G101.3 and sister station ESPN Radio 1490 & 100.9 WKBV.

A recording of the program also is available on WGTV Online in the "Video on Demand" section.

Today's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 32
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 24 (75%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 9
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 8 (88.9%
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 8
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 7 (87.5%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 167
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 21 (12.6% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 17

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Help LifeStream Deliver Hope to Isolated Seniors

Posted October 19, 2021

LifeStream Services is seeking support from the community to help deliver hope to older adults who are isolated and alone during the holidays with AngelWish. AngelWish is an annual program that coordinates the doorstep delivery of special gifts to isolated seniors in Blackford, Delaware, Fayette, Franklin, Grant, Henry, Jay, Madison, Randolph, Rush, Union, and Wayne counties. This is often the only visit and gift the recipients will receive during the holidays.

For over 20 years, the AngelWish program has delivered gifts to hundreds of seniors during the holiday season. This is made possible by the generosity of community businesses, clubs, churches, and individuals who ensure the most vulnerable are not forgotten during the holidays. Due to the continued threat of COVID-19, AngelWish recipients will receive a pre-packaged gift set that includes a combination of home safety items and holiday treats.

Below is how individuals and organizations can support AngelWish and isolated seniors:

  • Make a monetary donation: With just a $30 donation, a senior will receive a gift box. Donations can be made online at lifestreaminc.org/angelwish or mailed to 1701 Pilgrim Blvd. Yorktown, IN 47396. Please note AngelWish with the donation. Checks should be made payable to LifeStream Services.
  • Sign up to be a delivery elf: LifeStream expects to deliver 1,000 gift boxes between December 6 and December 24. Dependable volunteers are needed to help deliver the gift boxes to AngelWish recipients to ensure all boxes are delivered by December 24. People of all ages can volunteer. Volunteers under the age of 18 must be accompanied by an adult. Learn more or sign up at lifestreaminc.org/angelwish or contact Laura Bray, Volunteer Services Administrator, at 765-759-3372 or lbray@lifestreaminc.org.
  • Become a sponsor: Sponsorships start at $100 and go up to $2,000. Benefits can include logo and name listed on print and online materials, mentioned in e-newsletters, and the opportunity to provide promotional materials in the gift boxes. Sign up to sponsor AngelWish at lifestreaminc.org/angelwish or contact Angie Jenkins, Outreach Coordinator, at 765-759-1121 or ajenkins@lifestreaminc.org.

Learn more about the AngelWish program and its impact on isolated seniors at lifestreaminc.org/angelwish.

Micaela Knox Joins Model T Museum as Museum and Education Coordinator

Posted October 19, 2021

The Model T Museum welcomes Micaela Knox as the new Museum and Education Coordinator. Knox brings an ambitious passion for the museum sector with three years' experience in museums and gallery spaces and a background in public relations.

Knox served the David Owsley Museum of Art until late 2020, where they developed skills in strategic communication as the institution's public relations intern and honed an understanding of education as a visitor's assistant and docent. Knox also brings education and programming experience from roles at the Boys and Girls Club, Inspire Academy, and the Purdue University Northwest CHESS Art Gallery.

Knox gained a bachelor of arts in public relations and events management from Ball State University in December 2020 and is pursuing a graduate certificate in museum studies from IUPUI.

"We are so pleased to have Micaela join our staff," said Rachel Hughes, Executive Director of the Model T Ford Club, the non-profit that owns and operates the Museum. "Micaela has already offered ideas that will enhance our current programming and bring new and exciting exhibits to the Museum."

"Small museums are facing hardships right now in the post-quarantine world," Knox said. "I want to help bring people back to the Museum and also work to reposition the Model T Museum to have a greater presence in the Richmond community."

Of their goals in expanding the museum's educational offerings, Knox is determined to collaborate with the city of Richmond's traditional education community and design tours which address topics of diversity, industrialization, and specialized education through the perspective of the Model T Ford.

Knox can be reached by email at micaela@mtfca.com or on LinkedIn at linkedin.com/in/knoxmicaela.

The Model T Museum is located in the Historic Depot District in Richmond, Ind., at 309 N. 8th St. Free public parking is available onsite. For more information on hours and admission prices, please call (765) 488-0026 or visit mtfca.com/museum.

Which COVID-19 Vaccine Is Right for You?

Posted October 19, 2021

Three COVID-19 vaccines have been approved for use in the United States by federal health officials, and it can be a little confusing in trying to choose which one to get.

Here's a breakdown of each vaccine -- Pfizer, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson -- including information about who's eligible to get each one, how many doses you'll need, how each works, and more.

Regardless of which vaccine you choose, all three are safe, effective, and reduce your risk of severe illness from COVID-19.

Pfizer
  • Who can get it? Anyone 12 years and older
  • How many shots do you need? Two, given 21 days apart for most people. Those who are moderately to severely immunocompromised should get a third shot at least 28 days after their second.
  • When are you considered fully vaccinated? Two weeks after your second dose
  • How does it work? The vaccine uses mRNA to give instructions to your cells about how to make a harmless spike protein that is found on the surface of the virus that causes COVID-19. The spike protein triggers your body's immune response, allowing it to build immunity against the virus. Once the instructions are passed on, your cells get rid of the mRNA. It never enters the nucleus of the cells where the DNA resides.
  • Will I need a booster? Booster shots are recommended for anyone 65 and older as well as those 18 and older who meet certain guidelines. The booster shot should come at least six months after the second.
  • Has it been fully approved by the FDA? The FDA has given the Pfizer vaccine full approval for those 18 and older. It remains available under an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) for those ages 12-17.
Moderna
  • Who can get it? Anyone 18 years and older
  • How many shots do you need? Two, given 28 days apart for most people. However, as with the Pfizer vaccine, those who are moderately to severely immunocompromised should get a third dose at least 28 days after their second.
  • When are you considered fully vaccinated? Two weeks after your second dose
  • How does it work? The Moderna vaccine uses the same mRNA technology as Pfizer's.
  • Will I need a booster? An advisory group for the FDA on Thursday unanimously recommended booster shots for the same groups of people now eligible for a Pfizer booster, but a final decision has not been made yet. The CDC's advisory panel is scheduled to meet next week.
  • Has it been fully approved by the FDA? Not yet. It remains available for use under an EUA.
Johnson & Johnson
  • Who can get it? Anyone 18 years and older
  • How many shots do you need? One. Johnson & Johnson has not been given approval for an additional does for those who are moderately to severely immunocompromised.
  • When are you considered fully vaccinated? Two weeks after your shot
  • How does it work? Johnson & Johnson's vaccine is a viral vector vaccine. It operates in much the same way as Pfizer's and Moderna's except instead of using mRNA to deliver the instructions for making the COVID-19 spike protein, Johnson & Johnson's vaccine uses a modified version of a different virus. Like the other vaccines, the material does not integrate into a person's DNA.
  • Will I need a booster? The FDA's advisory panel today unanimously recommended a booster shot for everyone who has received the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, but the CDC still must weigh in before they are approved. That won't happen until next week.
  • Has it been fully approved by the FDA? Not yet. It remains available for use under an EUA.

FREE COVID-19 vaccinations are available at a number of nearby locations. Indiana residents can find sites and sign up for an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.

Today's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 43
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 31 (72.1%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 8
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 7 (87.5%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 6
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 5 (83.3%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 196
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 27 (13.8% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 17

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Posted October 19, 2021

Supplied Photo: Sign in front of a buildingNew Memorial Signs have been installed at each of EverHeart Hospice's office locations. Their offices are located in Greenville and Coldwater, OH, Winchester Indiana, and in the EverHeart Hospice Care Center located on the 4th floor of Wayne Healthcare in Greenville, OH.

Around Memorial Day, families were sent letters inviting them to remember their loved ones by having their names added to the memorial signs. Additionally, individuals and groups can also be honored on these signs, not just Hospice patients. Donations for the sign are always welcome but are not required to honor a loved one who has been lost or a special person or group.

Sarah Depoy, the Bereavement Coordinator for EverHeart Hospice, shared, "It is exciting to share our new signs with our communities as a way to honor a life lived, a life shared, a life loved, and a life who has touched others."

This year the Memorial Sign reflects the new brand as State of the Heart Care transitioned to EverHeart Hospice. The design of the sign is soft and invites the viewer to take a moment to peacefully reflect on the meaning of the sign. Also on the sign is a butterfly, which is often symbolic of the spiritual journey.

Jacque Collins is a Chaplain at Everheart Hospice and spends time speaking with patients and families experiencing the end-of-life journey or grieving a loss. She noted, "We all need somebody to listen and provide comfort while our hearts are mending." The signs are just one space for this process to occur and anyone is welcome to visit the signs for a moment of reflection.

Erica Wood, Business Development Specialist, helped coordinate the sign project. She says, "Our hope is that families feel welcome to take a moment and visit our memorial signs outside each of our offices. It's a great way to remember loved ones and reflect on special memories that may bring a tear to your eye, but also a smile to your face." 

Families and individuals are offered Bereavement Services for 13 months following the passing of their loved ones. These services are provided by EverHeart Hospice free of charge thanks to the generosity of donations to the agency. Bereavement services are available to anyone in the community who is grieving, not just those who have lost someone who received hospice care.

Those interested in learning more about Bereavement Support can call EverHeart Hospice at 1-800-417-7535 or visit their website at everhearthospice.org.

A Few Key Reminders About COVID-19 Testing and What Should Happen After the Test

Posted October 7, 2021

With COVID-19 case counts still high, it's a good time to review what should happen when someone tests positive for the virus, especially considering some of the guidance from federal health officials has changed since the pandemic's early days thanks to the presence of vaccines.

I tested negative

A negative result likely means you don't have COVID-19, or at least you didn't at the time your sample was collected. You should consult your school/workplace policies to find out whether you can return to your normal schedule.

I tested positive

All those who test positive for COVID-19 -- whether fully vaccinated or not -- should isolate from others for at least 10 days from either their first day of symptoms or the day of their positive test, whichever was earlier.

The Indiana Department of Health's page on contact tracing says you can spread COVID-19 two days before you begin to have symptoms. Once you test positive, you should reach out to anyone you've been in close contact with so they can begin their quarantine. Close contact is defined as being within 6 feet for a total of 15 minutes or more over a 24-hour period.

If you don't have symptoms, you should reach out to any close contacts from the 48 hours before you were tested. If you do have symptoms, it's the 48 hours before you developed those symptoms.

I've been exposed to someone who tested positive

Anyone who is not fully vaccinated who has been in close contact with someone who has COVID-19 should quarantine for 14 days.

Those who are fully vaccinated -- anyone who has received both doses of a two-dose vaccine such as Pfizer or Moderna or the single-dose Johnson & Johnson vaccine -- do not need to quarantine after exposure unless the vaccinated person is symptomatic.

Fully vaccinated people should get tested 3-5 days after their exposure even if they don't have symptoms and wear a mask in public for 14 days after exposure or until they get a negative test result.

What should I be on the lookout for now that I've tested positive?

Those who have complications typically see them in the second week or about eight days after the onset of symptoms. Watch for worsening symptoms and don't delay contacting your primary care provider should they appear.

According to the CDC, if you have trouble breathing, persistent pain or pressure in your chest, new confusion, an inability to wake up or stay awake, or pale, gray, or blue-colored skin, lips, or nail beds, seek emergency medical care immediately. Call 911 or go to the nearest Emergency Room.

If you need to schedule a COVID-19 test or are looking for your results, call Reid Health's COVID hotline at (765) 965-4200. The hotline is available 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. seven days a week to help with testing and those who need clinical advice.

Today's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 48
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 38 (79.2%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 9
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 9 (100%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 5
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 5 (100%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 339
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 32 (9.4% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 14

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Foundation Announces Finalists for 2022 Lilly Endowment Community Scholarship

Posted October 11, 2021

The Wayne County Foundation is pleased to announce that among a pool of 79 highly competitive applicants, five high school seniors who attend Wayne County schools have been selected as finalists for the 2022 Lilly Endowment Community Scholarship.

  • Emily Cox, Lincoln High School
  • Esther Etherington, Richmond High School
  • Devin Frazier, Centerville High School
  • Shayna Morris, Lincoln High School
  • Garrett Walther, Centerville High School

From the five finalists, two will be awarded the scholarship. The applications were thoroughly reviewed and independently scored by members of the Foundation's selection committee. In selecting the finalists, consideration was given for a student's activities, achievements, community service, academic performance, financial need, work experience, and leadership potential.

Finalists will be interviewed in October and interview scores will determine the finalists' rankings. The committee's recommendations will be submitted to Independent Colleges of Indiana, Inc. for final review of the scholarship recipients. The 2022 Lilly Endowment Community Scholars for Wayne County will be announced in December 2021.

Lilly Endowment Community Scholars are awarded a four-year, full-tuition scholarship to pursue baccalaureate degrees at colleges or universities in the state Indiana. The scholarship also includes up to $900 annually for required textbooks and equipment. To date, more than 50 Wayne County students have been awarded the scholarship since the program began in 1998.

For more information on the Lilly Endowment Community Scholarship or other scholarships administered by Wayne County Foundation, visit https://waynecountyfoundation.org/ or contact Alex Painter, Community Engagement Officer, at 765-962-1638.

Senior Adult Ministry October Meeting

Posted October 11, 2021

Do you have questions about Hospice Care? Then attend the next meeting of the Senior Adult Ministry which will be held at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, October 26, at First United Methodist Church, 318 National Road West, Richmond, IN.

Bring snacks to share and invite a friend for a presentation by Valerie King from Premier Hospice Health Care.

Senior Adult Ministry is an active group of seniors over 50 years old open to all regardless of religious affiliation. The group is guided by Pastor Judi Marshall, Clara Bulmer and Beverly Kirby. These three women actively share their gifts of ministry, hospitality and creativity in planning and organizing the monthly meetings.

For further information, call 765-962-4357.

Applications are Open for Next Generation Hoosier Educators Scholarship

Posted October 11, 2021

Students have until January 31, 2022 to apply for renewable $7,500 scholarship

(INDIANAPOLIS) – High-achieving high school and college students who are planning to teach in the State of Indiana for at least five years can apply for a $7,500 scholarship per year of college (up to $30,000 total) through the Next Generation Hoosier Educators Scholarship program.

The Indiana Commission for Higher Education is encouraging students to act quickly, as there are only 200 scholarships available and the deadline to apply is January 31, 2022. Interested students should apply at ScholarTrack.IN.gov.

"Everyone has a story about a great teacher who changed their lives for the better. We need more of these change agents in Indiana's classrooms," said Dr. Katie Jenner, Indiana Secretary of Education. "The Next Generation Hoosier Educators Scholarship is elevating the importance of this lifelong impact with a meaningful scholarship to help support Indiana's best and brightest as they pursue a career in education."

This scholarship is making a difference at building Indiana's teacher pipeline. Nearly 90 percent of scholarship recipients from the inaugural 2017 cohort are either continuing their education or have already become licensed teachers actively making an impact for Hoosier students.

To qualify for the scholarship, students must have either graduated in the top 20 percent of their high school class or earned a score in the top 20th percentile on the SAT (1190) or ACT (26). To continue earning the scholarship in college, students must file a Free Application for Federal Student Aid each year, earn a 3.0 cumulative GPA and complete at least 30 credit hours per year. Current college students who apply must be able to use the scholarship for at least two full academic years.

"The Next Generation Hoosier Educators Scholarship not only assists future educators in funding their higher education, but it helps keep those who become licensed teaching in Indiana," said Indiana Commissioner for Higher Education Teresa Lubbers. "We look forward to the positive impact these educators will have on their students and on Indiana's teacher pipeline."

The Commission will review all applications and notify applicants of their scholarship status via email by March 18, 2022.Supplied Photo:  Maylee Barriger

A total of 438 students applied for the 2021-22 Next Generation Hoosier Educators Scholarship, with applications from 229 high schools in 84 of Indiana's 92 counties. Nearly three-quarters of applicants were Indiana high school seniors with the remainder comprised of current college students.

Maylee Barriger, a recent graduate from Hauser Jr.-Sr. High School in Hope, Indiana, is one of the 2020-21 scholarship recipients. Barriger is currently attending Indiana University-Purdue University Columbus where she's pursuing a major in elementary education with an endorsement for middle school math. Upon graduation, she wants to teach at either her former Jr.-Sr. high school or Hope Elementary.

"I was super nervous to go to college because I was not sure I could afford it," said Barriger. "I'm really thankful for this scholarship because it's given me the opportunity to stay at home and be close to my family, work to save money and be involved in my community in new ways I was not able to in high school."

Visit www.LearnMoreIndiana.org/NextTeacher for more information on how to apply and follow #NextTeacher on social media. Questions may be directed to NextTeacher@che.in.gov.

For questions about state financial aid, students can contact the Indiana Commission for Higher Education by phone at 888-528-4719 or via email at awards@che.in.gov.

Caregivers Invited to Drive-Thru Appreciation Events

Posted October 4, 2021

LifeStream Services invites caregivers to the Caregiver Drive-Thru Appreciation events in celebration of National Family Caregivers Month in November. Caregivers can drive-thru to receive helpful caregiver resources from local organizations and a sweet treat.

Registration is not required and there is no fee to attend this event. CDC guidelines will be in place to keep the events safe for the community. LifeStream will host two events in Connersville and Richmond:

  • Richmond Caregiver Drive-Thru Appreciation: Wednesday, November 3 from 11:00am to noon at The Leland Legacy located at 900 S. A St. Richmond, IN 47374.
  • Connersville Caregiver Drive-Thru Appreciation: Wednesday, November 10 from 11:00am to noon at Majestic Care of Connersville located at 1029 E. 5th St. Connersville, IN 47331.
LifeStream Services recognizes the importance of family caregivers and the sacrifices they make to keep their loved one(s) safe and healthy. This event is one way LifeStream and partners can give back to those who give so much. For more information regarding caregiver resources provided by LifeStream or the Caregiver Drive-Thru Appreciation events, please contact Angie Jenkins, Outreach Coordinator, at 765-759-1121 or ajenkins@lifestreaminc.org. More information at lifestreaminc.org.

A Story Tracing the Rise of Madam C.J. Walker, Told by Award-Winning Storyteller Deborah Asante

Posted October 11, 2021

Supplied Graphic:  Madam C.J. Walker's Story

Morrisson-Reeves Library presents a storytelling performance by award-winning storyteller and actress, Deborah Asante on Thursday, October, 21st at 6:00 pm. The art of storytelling brings the iconic Madam C.J. Walker to life in a historical portrayal of the successful business woman.

A rags-to-riches saga like no other, full of challenges and triumphs, the Madam C.J. Walker's story is an inspiration. Facing poverty and tragedy from a very young age, Sarah Breedlove beats the odds and becomes the first woman in America to be a self-made millionaire. Storyteller Deborah Asante guides our exploration of the girl, the wife, the mother, the mogul, all parts of the woman known as Madam Walker.

Madam C.J. Walker (1867-1919) was lauded as "the first Black woman millionaire in America" for her successful line of hair-care products. Born Sarah Breedlove in Louisiana, she was widowed by age 20 and took work as a laundress. After seeking treatment for hair loss, she developed "The Walker System" and sold her homemade products directly to Black women. Talented in the art of self-promotion, she built a booming national enterprise. In 1910, she moved her headquarters to Indianapolis, where the company eventually trained 20,000 workers, mostly door-to-door saleswomen. Madam Walker also funded scholarships for women and donated large sums to the NAACP, the Black YMCA and dozens of other charities.

This performance was commissioned by the Indiana Historical Society and Storytelling Arts of Indiana.

Registration is required to attend this event. Register by calling the library at 765-966-8291 or online at MRLinfo.org/events

This library's event will have a limit on the number of participants and will follow all current Covid protocols (contact MRL for the most current procedures).

About Deborah Asante

Deborah Asante is an actress, writer, director and storyteller. She has worked for Arts for Learning for over a decade and been an accomplished performer for even more. She has received numerous awards, including the Aesop Cup for Tall Tales and the Zora Neale Hurston Award from the National Association of Black Storytellers. The Arts Council of Indianapolis has honored her twice as a Creative Renewal Arts Fellow. Asante is also the founder and artistic director of the Asante Arts Institute. She has dedicated her life to teaching and sharing the value of culture and heritage through the performing arts.

Facebook Event Listing: https://www.facebook.com/events/982019299043606

Photos courtesy of: https://storytellingarts.org/event/sarah-the-dreambuilder-a-story-tracing-the-rise-of- madam-cj-walker-told-by-deborah-asante-3/?instance_id=874

Free Concert with Kelly Zullo

Posted October 11, 2021

Supplied Photo:  Kelly Zullo

The Friends of Morrisson-Reeves Library presents a free musical performance by guitarist Kelly Zullo on Friday, October, 15th at 5:30 pm. The doors open at 5:00 pm and music starts at 5:30 pm. Zullo, who won the Columbus, Ohio Songwriter Association competition's "best songwriter" category, fuses funk, jazz and Americana, and will perform in the Library's Historic Courtyard as weather permits. If it's rainy, the concert will be moved indoors at the library.

"Americana Transcendentalist" Kelly Zullo writes songs reflecting the likes of Emerson with an adoration of the writing style of Patty Griffin. Known in the guitar community for her fast "finger slamming" style, Kelly has fused that element with her inspirational songwriting and vocals. Zullo is described as a one-person band.

In her hometown of Columbus, Ohio, she was voted 614 Magazine's "Best Solo Musician" for 2014/15 and most recently was reviewed by Guitar World Magazine, describing her latest release as "An energetic acoustic guitar assault by this skilled, funky speed demon." Kelly also appeared in the 2014 show, "Woodchopper's Ball" at Kent Stage in Columbus, Ohio which features 9 of the top acoustic guitarists from around the country. For more information on Zullo's music, see kellyzullo.com/

This concert is coordinated by local music enthusiast Joe Augustin who helps introduce cherished musicians to our local community.

The library will have a limit on the number of participants and will follow all current Covid protocols (contact MRL for the most current procedures). Face Coverings over the nose and mouth are required while inside the library. For outdoor events, face coverings and social distancing are recommended for attendees.

Grab Bag Book Sale to be Held October 16th

Posted October 11, 2021

Supplied Graphic:  MRL Book SaleThe Friends of Morrisson-Reeves Library have a fun event planned for all avid readers in our community! The Grab Bag Book Sale is offered Saturday, October 16th from 10:00 am – 1:00 pm. Shop from the convenience of your car. Volunteers will be on hand to take your order and delivery the books to your trunk.

Drive-thru the library's parking lot and purchase $5 Grab Bags of books. Look for the orange tent for the pick-up location.

Grab Bags will be prefilled with a selection of gently used, popular books that have been donated to the library. This is not a typical browser's delight Book Sale where shoppers can select books of their choice. Each prefilled bag is sealed after it is packed by volunteers.

Book categories available at this sale are fiction, cookbooks, youth, picture books, mysteries, romance, science fiction and suspense. Cash or check accepted.

Humanity in Medicine Honor 'Long Overdue' for 2021 Winner

Posted October 4, 2021

Supplied Photo: Dr. Rohit BawaWhen Daniel Wegg heard Rohit Bawa wasn't on the list of previous winners of the Paul S. Rhoads Humanity in Medicine Award, he was shocked.

"When I look over the list of the people who have had the award, the most surprising thing is that Dr. Bawa's name wasn't on it 10 years ago," said Wegg, M.D., Family Medicine. "I couldn't believe it when somebody said he'd never had the award. I thought to myself surely he's been recognized time and again."

Dr. Wegg wasn't alone in thinking Bawa, M.D., Otolaryngology, had to have been honored with the award already.

"You wonder, 'How did he slide under the radar for so long?' He's been a steady, constant, consistent, loyal performer who cares about Reid, cares about the community, cares about his patients, cares about the medical staff," said Craig Kinyon, Reid Health President/CEO.

"I would say he's deserving of this on so many levels. It's hard to even describe which one stands out the most."

Dr. Bawa officially was added to the list of winners Friday evening, becoming the 41st recipient of the award named after its first honoree, the late Paul S. Rhoades, M.D., in 1983.

"I think this is long overdue, and 100 percent well-deserved," Dr. Wegg said.

Dr. Bawa's selection for the award was announced at an annual medical staff appreciation and new physician reception in Richmond. Nominations were solicited from patients, physicians, and healthcare workers.

Authorized as an annual event by Reid's governing board in 1983, the Humanity in Medicine Award honors the memory of Dr. Rhoads for his service to patients and medicine. He was the founding director of Reid's Medical Education Department and helped organize the hospice program and the Wayne County adult clinic for the indigent.

"I feel very proud. I follow in a long line of distinguished physicians - some I've known for a long time," Dr. Bawa said. "It humbles me to be included in that list. I never thought I would get this award.

"The honor is not just for me. It's for the entire team. It's my clinical team, my medical assistants, the nurses, the people I work with in the operating room, my colleagues, the nurses in the hospital. Everybody works together. I'm just one representative of the entire team that takes care of the patients."

"You wonder, 'How did he slide under the radar for so long?' He's been a steady, constant, consistent, loyal performer who cares about Reid, cares about the community, cares about his patients, cares about the medical staff. I would say he's deserving of this on so many levels. It's hard to even describe which one stands out the most." -- Craig Kinyon, Reid Health President/CEO

Dr. Bawa's colleagues praised his work ethic, wondering how he finds time to not only care for his patients at his practice's main location in Richmond but also make time for outreach to other communities in Reid's service area. Then there's his position as chair of the Reid Health Physician Associates Network Operating Council and other various committees and leadership roles.

"I can't even count the number of committees he's on," said Kristy Carter, Physician Assistant. "In the office, he's always doing something else while he's seeing patients. We don't stand still. I always joke that he couldn't be an ortho surgeon because you have to wait for cement to dry and he couldn't stand still for 15 minutes."

"Working alongside Dr. Bawa, I'm in a constant state of awe about how he keeps juggling so many things with absolute grace and humility," said Misti Foust-Cofield, Reid Vice President/Chief Nursing Officer.

"He is truly an inspiration just to see how he manages the several different hats he wears and never loses sight of being here to serve others, whether that's patients or other medical staff members or patients' families. He has a true heart to serve other people."

A native of India, Dr. Bawa came to the United States with his family at the age of 11. He grew up in the Westchester, Ohio, area near Cincinnati. He earned his bachelor's and doctoral degrees from the University of Cincinnati and did his residency at West Virginia University Hospitals in Morgantown, W.Va.

"Working alongside Dr. Bawa, I'm in a constant state of awe about how he keeps juggling so many things with absolute grace and humility. He is truly an inspiration just to see how he manages the several different hats he wears and never loses sight of being here to serve others, whether that's patients or other medical staff members or patients' families. He has a true heart to serve other people." -- Misti Foust-Cofield, Reid Vice President/Chief Nursing Officer

Dr. Bawa came to Richmond in 1994, hired by David Jetmore, M.D., to join Jetmore's growing ENT practice.

"A lot of people don't realize how involved he has been with Reid, serving on various committees, and he's done this for years," Dr. Jetmore said. "These are things where you don't get a lot of applause when you walk into the room. A lot of the things you do go totally unrecognized.

"He's not been a person who looks for acclaim. He just toils quietly away, many times behind the scenes."

Dr. Bawa loves to travel with his fiancée, Dr. Lisa Carter. Years ago, he spotted a magazine article naming 50 places of a lifetime, and they've been steadily checking off destinations from the list.

"I think we've ticked off about 20 to 25 roughly. Our goal is to end up in all those places," he said. "I like to learn. She loves to learn. We have the same mentality about exploring and learning new things. And traveling does that for us."

The couple have five children, Raman, Rajan, and Rhea Bawa and Zachary and Gabriella Harris.

"When he commits to something, you get 100 percent of Dr. Bawa," Dr. Wegg said. "I don't know how he keeps giving up 100 percent of himself and still having anything left over, but he does. I don't know how he manufactures time like that.

"He's just everywhere. When there's major decisions to be made, when there's leadership required, he is there. He's the first person you think of, and I respect him immensely for that."

CDC Health Alert Urges Pregnant People to Get COVID-19 Vaccine

Posted October 4, 2021

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently issued a health alert urging those who are pregnant, recently pregnant, who are trying to become pregnant now, or who might become pregnant in the future to get vaccinated against COVID-19.

According to the CDC, as of Sept. 27, more than 125,000 COVID-19 cases had been reported in pregnant people, with more than 22,000 hospitalizations and 161 deaths. Some 97% of pregnant people hospitalized this year for illness or for labor and delivery who tested positive for COVID-19 were unvaccinated.

As of Sept. 18, only 31% of pregnant people were fully vaccinated before or during their pregnancy.

Pregnancy causes changes in the body that could make it easier to get very sick from respiratory viruses such as the one that causes COVID-19.

In addition to the same severe illness and death risks that all those with COVID-19 face, pregnant people who become infected have a higher likelihood for preterm birth, stillbirth, and the need for their baby to be admitted to an intensive care unit.

Meanwhile, studies have shown breastfeeding people have antibodies in their breastmilk, which could help protect their babies from infection.

In addition to the same severe illness and death risks that all those with COVID-19 face, pregnant people who become infected have a higher likelihood for preterm birth, stillbirth, and the need for their baby to be admitted to an intensive care unit.

The CDC says the COVID-19 vaccines are safe for those who are pregnant, breastfeeding, or who hope to become pregnant in the future. There is no evidence the vaccines cause infertility issues.

Along with the CDC, the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology and the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine have endorsed COVID-19 vaccination during pregnancy.

FREE vaccinations are available at a number of nearby locations. Indiana residents can find sites and sign up for an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.

Today's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 54
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 41 (75.9%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 9
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 9 (100%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 5
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 5 (100%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 652
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 120 (18.4% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 20

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

International Day of the Girl: The Importance of Supporting Young Women

Posted October 4, 2021

By: Jackie Webb, Board President, Girls Inc. of Wayne County

"I feel safe and like I belong here," said one of the girls of Girls Inc. of Wayne County. Girls Inc. becomes the promise for a better, brighter future that is quietly beating deep inside the hearts of girls throughout Wayne County. On International Day of the Girl, we not only recognize the importance of serving girls in Wayne County but all girls.

International Day of the Girl is an international observance day declared by the U.N., taking place each year on Oct. 11. The day is meant to support more opportunities for girls and increase awareness of inequality faced by girls worldwide based upon their gender. At Girls Inc. of Wayne County, we take time on International Day of the Girl to celebrate the progress we have made at our organization and recognize the work that needs to be done to improve girls' rights everywhere.

Girls Inc. of Wayne County delivers nine core programs that inspire girls to be strong, smart and bold. Our programs like Economic Literacy, Friendly PEERsuasion and Leadership & Community Action equip girls with the skills they need to be strong wherever they decide to go in the world. As Girls Inc. and our girls continue to grow, we hope that the programs will continue to inspire girls on their own journey and support other women in their endeavors.

Girls are facing similar issues whether they are in Wayne County or somewhere else in the world. It is essential that we understand the differences in each and every girl and embrace them, as they are each facing their unique set of challenges. While organizations like Girls Inc. are available to some girls, not every girl is lucky enough to have access to support depending on where they are at in the world.

Support beyond the organization is vital. Community and workforce must be an example to these girls that the values taught at Girls Inc. are demonstrated in "real life" situations. Community members, government entities and businesses need to mirror the objectives of Girls Inc. to prove that honesty, integrity, and hard work will lead to a successful and satisfying outcome.

International Day of the Girl provides us with a moment to look at how we support girls and encourage them to advocate for themselves. Girls Inc. affiliates like Wayne County have the ability to impact girls, but this influence needs to work its way into everyday situations. The values we find key on International Day of the Girl should be top of mind on a daily basis to encourage girls to reach their full potential.

For more information about Girls Inc. of Wayne County, visit https://www.girlsincwayne.org/.

Those Who Have Had COVID-19 Should Still Get Vaccinated

Posted October 4, 2021

Since the Delta variant-fueled surge in COVID-19 cases began in July, more than 2,500 people in Wayne County alone have tested positive for the virus.

The vast majority of those people were unvaccinated when they became infected. Across all of Indiana, only about 1.2% of the fully vaccinated have had a breakthrough case since the state's first full vaccinations in mid-January.

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), those who have recovered from COVID-19 should get vaccinated. The CDC cites evidence that suggests people get better protection from reinfection by being fully vaccinated, including one study that showed unvaccinated people who already had COVID-19 are more than two times more likely than fully vaccinated people to become infected again.

Anyone who was treated with monoclonal antibodies or convalescent plasma while sick with COVID-19 should wait 90 days before getting a vaccine.

Everyone else can get the FREE shot as soon as they've recovered from their illness and have met the criteria for discontinuing isolation, which includes 10 days after symptoms first appeared, 24 hours with no fever without the use of medication, and other COVID-19 symptoms having improved.

Those who test positive for the virus but don't have symptoms should wait to get vaccinated until 10 days have passed since their test.

People who have been exposed to someone who has tested positive for COVID-19 should wait to get vaccinated after their 14-day quarantine period has ended.

FREE vaccinations are available at a number of nearby locations. Indiana residents can find sites and sign up for an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.

Today's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 45
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 34 (75.6%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 10
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 10 (100%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 7
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 7 (100%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 276
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 18 (6.5% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 18
Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

FAFSA Opens Today For 2022-2023 School Year

Posted October 4, 2021

Hoosier students can apply for state financial aid through April 15, 2022

Hoosier students and families are encouraged to file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), which is now open for the 2022-2023 school year.

The Indiana Commission for Higher Education reminds Hoosiers that filing the FAFSA by April 15, 2022 is imperative for securing money for college and accessing some of the $390 million in state financial aid and billions of dollars in federal aid available for learners.

"Regardless of family income, filing the FAFSA is an important first step for anyone interested in education and training beyond high school," said Indiana Commissioner for Higher Education Teresa Lubbers. "It's surprising how much money is left on the table each year because many Hoosiers assume they don't qualify for state or federal financial aid. There is a significant amount of funding available to help with the cost of college, but you must at least have a FAFSA on file to use it."

Filing the FAFSA is required for many of Indiana's scholarship and grant opportunities, such as the Frank O'Bannon Grant and the Next Level Jobs Workforce Ready Grant, and many colleges require a completed FAFSA to award merit and need-based scholarships. Regardless of the degree being pursued – including short-term certificates, associate and bachelor's degrees and higher – students should file the FAFSA to potentially qualify for available financial aid.

Currently, there are nearly 15,000 high school seniors who qualify for Indiana's early-college promise program, the 21st Century Scholars program. Completing the FAFSA on time is a necessary step for Scholars to earn the full scholarship amount of up to four years of college tuition.

How to file the FAFSA

Students can file the FAFSA online at FAFSA.gov. The first step for students who have not previously filed the FAFSA is to create a Federal Student Aid (FSA) ID. Then, each student will need:

  • Social Security number
  • Alien Registration number (for non-U.S. citizens)
  • Federal income tax returns, W-2s and other records of money earned from 2020
  • Bank statements and records of investments (if applicable)
  • Records of untaxed income (if applicable)

Improvements to simplify and shorten the FAFSA are coming for the 2023-24 academic year, however this year filers will notice a new look to the form, making it easier to navigate and get assistance. The U.S. Department of Education provides email and live chat assistance for FAFSA filers as well as a helpline at 800-4FED-AID. Hoosier families can also access free FAFSA help through INvestEd Indiana at www.investedindiana.org.

Posted October 4, 2021

NATCO Credit Union Selected as the First Place State Level Recipient for the Dora Maxwell Social Responsibility Community Service Award

Posted October 4, 2021

Supplied Photo:  NATCO Employees with AwardIndiana Credit Union League announced that Natco Credit Union was selected as the first-place winner of the Dora Maxwell Social Responsibility Community Service Award for Indiana in the asset size of $50 million to $250 million.

Dora Maxwell was a credit union pioneer who worked with numerous organizations to improve the living standards of the poor and needy. Many years ago, the Dora Maxwell Social Responsibility Recognition Program was established to encourage involvement in community projects and activities.

Each year, credit unions across Indiana have the opportunity to compete with other credit unions in their asset category for the Dora Maxwell award. This year, we submitted an entry based on our Volunteer Individual Tax Assistance (VITA) program offered through Natco Community Empowerment Center (NCEC). The two-person staff of NCEC found innovative and transformative ways to provide safe alternative methods for collecting tax information and providing finalized returns. During the most recent tax season, they prepared and submitted a total of 1158 returns totaling $1.5 million in Federal refunds and $185,000 in State refunds. By offering this free service, individuals and families saved nearly half a million dollars ($497,940) in fees*. When spent locally, businesses in our area and our economy were stimulated.

On September 10th, Natco Credit Union was recognized as the first-place state winner in the $50 - $250 million asset category. Cindy Duke, CEO, Sherry Dillon, Director of Administration and Innovation and Doug Macias, Community Development Officer accepted the award during the Indiana Credit Union League Convention. As the first-place winner, our entry was forwarded to CUNA (Credit Union National Association) for the national competition.

Natco Credit Union is a community based, not-for-profit credit union committed to providing an alternative to other financial institutions. In our commitment to people helping people, Natco Credit Union's mission is helping people live better lives.

Natco Credit Union currently serves over 16,000 members and is over $133 million in assets. Our services are available to any industrial workers or family member within a 25 mile radius of Richmond, IN and anyone who lives or works in the following Indiana counties – Wayne, Fayette, Randolph, Henry, Rush, Union, and Franklin. Membership is also available to any family member of an existing member.

Hunters Can Donate Deer to Help Feed Hungry Hoosiers

Posted September 30, 2021

Conservation Officers encourage Indiana hunters to donate harvested deer to help feed hungry Hoosiers.

The Sportsmen's Benevolence Fund administered by the DNR Division of Law Enforcement provides grants to Hoosiers Feeding the Hungry, the Dubois County Sportsmen Club, and Hunters and Farmers Feeding the Hungry to pay for processing fees when hunters donate legally harvested deer.

Participating in the program is simple:

Enjoy a deer hunting experience.

  • Harvest a deer.
  • Drop off the field-dressed deer at a local participating processor.
  • Processing fees are paid for by the Sportsmen's Benevolence Fund.
  • The processor will create healthy venison burger to distribute to food banks.

The participating organizations notify food banks throughout Indiana when venison is ready to be collected from certified Sportsmen's Benevolence Fund butchers. The food banks distribute venison to soup kitchens and food pantries.

As a result of the 2020 deer hunting seasons, the Sportsmen's Benevolence Fund provided funding to process more than 360 harvested deer that resulted in more than 20,650 pounds of venison being donated.

For information on donating your harvested deer and participating processors, please visit sbf.IN.gov.

Booster Shots vs. Third Doses: What's the Difference

Posted September 30, 2021

In recent weeks, federal health officials have approved extra doses of some COVID-19 vaccines for certain groups of people. Either "booster shot" or "third dose" are used to describe the extra jabs, and although the terms sound like they can be used interchangeably, they actually have very different official meanings.

To help clear up some of the confusion, here's a breakdown of what each term means, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Booster shot

Who's it for? Pfizer vaccine recipients who are 65 years and older or are 18 years and older and have underlying medical conditions such as cancer; chronic kidney, liver, lung, or heart conditions; diabetes; pregnancy; obesity; and HIV, or are 18 and older and work or live in high-risk settings such as first responders (healthcare workers, firefighters, police), long-term care, education, food and agriculture, manufacturing, prisons and jails, public transit, U.S Postal Service, and grocery stores.

Which vaccine is approved for it? Only Pfizer. The CDC says it expects booster doses will be approved at some point for both the Moderna and Johnson & Johnson vaccines as well, but more data is needed first.

If you're eligible, when should you get it? At least six months after your second dose.

Third dose

Who's it for? Pfizer and Moderna vaccine recipients who are moderately to severely immunocompromised, which can include those who have been receiving active cancer treatment for tumors or cancers of the blood, received an organ transplant and are taking medication to suppress the immune system, received a stem cell transplant within the past two years or are taking medication to suppress the immune system, moderate or severe primary immunodeficiency (such as DiGeorge syndrome or Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome), advanced or untreated HIV infection, and active treatment with high-dose corticosteroids or other drugs that might suppress the immune system. Talk with your healthcare provider about your particular medical condition and whether the additional dose is appropriate for you.

Which vaccines are approved for it? Both of the vaccines that use mRNA technology, which means Pfizer and Moderna.

The third dose should be of the same vaccine that was received the first two times, but if the same one isn't available, the CDC says the other can be used.

If you're eligible, when should you get it? At least 28 days after your second dose.

FREE vaccinations are available at a number of nearby locations. Indiana residents can find sites and sign up for an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.

Today's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 45
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 34 (75.6%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 8
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 8 (100%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 7
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 7 (100%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 371
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 69 (18.6% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 19

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Reid Hearing Center Takes Center Stage at Medical Monday

Posted September 30, 2021

Supplied Photo:  Stacy BordenIf you find yourself having a little trouble hearing these days, you'll want to check out October's Medical Monday event.

Reid Health audiologist Stacy Borden will discuss the services offered by the Reid Hearing Center during her presentation titled "Can You Hear Me Now?".

The free presentation will begin at 1 p.m. Monday, Oct. 11 at Central United Methodist Church, 1425 E. Main St. in Richmond.

To register for the event, call Sharrie Harlin Davis at (765) 983-3000, ext. 4676. Masks are required to attend.

Medical Monday is supported by Reid Health Community Benefit. Harlin Davis started the event when she was working for the Minority Health Coalition and maintained it after joining Reid Health. The event has built a loyal following, averaging 40 to 50 guests each month to learn about various health issues and community programs.

It's in the Name: ClaimAid Plays Vital Role in Helping Neighborhood Health Center Patients

Posted September 30, 2021

Neighborhood Health Center's (NHC) partner to help patients with financial challenges to getting care is an appropriately named organization for the job – ClaimAid does exactly what the name implies.

"ClaimAid specializes in helping patients find programs to help cover their medical expenses," said Carrie Miles, CEO of NHC. "This program and our advocate are a great resource for patients to assist with completing confusing forms or respond to any mailing information they may receive."

Richinda Banks, Revenue Cycle Supervisor for NHC, said NHC has a ClaimAid advocate, Kristin Harris is available Monday through Fridays to help patients. The advocate is in Richmond's location Mondays and Fridays and in Liberty Tuesdays through Thursdays. Harris can help patients find insurance options based on income and household size, apply for NHC's sliding fee discount program, find medication assistance and set up affordable payment plans.

Patients can meet with an advocate in private office space so they can be more comfortable discussing financial need, she said. "We encourage all new patients without insurance coverage to meet with our ClaimAid advocate before establishing care at NHC because she can assist our patients quickly to determine what help they may be able to receive."

Patients who have a single source of coverage or who have had changes in their income may find they qualify for additional assistance – and ClaimAid can help them find out. "The advocate can help the patient make the best decision based on their personal and unique needs," Miles said. "In 2020, NHC was able to help 450 patients obtain Medicaid coverage. We are on pace to meet and possibly exceed that number in 2021. This is life changing coverage for patients."

Banks said patients who don't think they qualify for Medicaid or sliding fee discounts find they do after working with ClaimAid. "This lessens the burden and reduces barriers for accessing healthcare services."

NHC also provides on-site Spanish interpretation to help with forms and conversations.

Neighborhood Health Centers offer quality primary care and mental health services to people at its Richmond and Union County locations.

To schedule an appointment with ClaimAid at NHC, simply call 965-4299 or 458-5191 or stop in during normal business hours at one of our offices: 101 South 10th, Richmond; or 950 N. Market Street, Liberty.

Mindful Explorations Presents Award-Winning Author, Social Justice Scholar Monique W. Morris to Discuss Empowering Black Girls

Posted September 29, 2021

An award-winning author and social justice scholar is the featured presenter in this year's first Mindful Explorations event at Indiana University East.

Supplied Photo:  Monique Morris
Monique W. Morris, Ed.D., an award-winning author and social justice scholar with three decades of experience in the areas of education, civil rights, juvenile and criminal justice, will virtually present during IU East's Mindful Explorations event on October 6.

Monique W. Morris, Ed.D., will virtually present "Empowering Black Girls in Schools and Society" at 5:15 p.m. on Wednesday, October 6, on IU East Facebook Live at https://www.facebook.com/events/285833289753954. The presentation will begin with a panel discussion led by IU East faculty, and Morris' presentation will begin at 6 p.m.

The presentation is free and open to the public.

Morris has 30 years of experience in education, civil rights, and juvenile and criminal justice. She is the president/CEO of Grantmakers for Girls of Color, a philanthropic collaborative that supports a world where all girls and young women of color can thrive.

She is the executive producer and co-writer of the documentary film, Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools, which will be available for participants to view ahead of the event. The film is based on two of her books - Sing A Rhythm, Dance A Blues: Education for Liberation of Black and Brown Girls and Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools.

For the Mindful Explorations discussion, Morris will expand on themes in the documentary and the continuing urgency of understanding and responding to the experiences of Black girls in schools and social institutions.

The event is sponsored by the IU East School of Education, the Office of Diversity and Inclusion, the School of Nursing and Health Sciences, the School of Business and Economics, the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, and Mindful Explorations, courtesy of the William H. and Jean R. Reller Endowment.

Morris is a prolific writer about social justice issues and has lectured widely on research, policies and practices associated with improving juvenile/criminal justice, educational, and socioeconomic conditions for girls and women of color. She is the Founder of the National Black Women's Justice Institute (NBWJI), which works to interrupt school-to-confinement pathways for girls and reduce barriers to employment for formerly incarcerated women, and increase the capacity of organizations working to reduce sexual assault and domestic violence in African American communities.

Josh Tolbert, associate professor of education, said he was inspired by Morris' books, which eventually led to the plan to bring her to IU East for Mindful Explorations.

"I read Pushout in 2016 and it was really powerful. I had already been teaching for quite some time, and what Dr. Morris wrote made me reevaluate my own past practice and completely reshaped the way I thought about the future," Tolbert said.

Tolbert added the documentary and the virtual event will be beneficial to anyone, not just those in education.

"Her work focuses on the experience of black girls and black women in society. It is so relevant to everything - nursing, business, criminal justice, women's and gender studies, to name a few," Tolbert said.

Morris also excels not only in presenting the existing problems, but also on developing programs and solutions to respond appropriately," Tolbert said. "Her work has a universal quality to it."

He trusts the presentation and discussion will "raise awareness and create a desire in people to keep working for equity in our communities."

To view the documentary ahead of the event, individuals with an IU login can access it through the Campus Library at https://purl.dlib.indiana.edu/iudl/media/q27z60kj19. Community members without an IU login are encouraged to contact the Campus Library at liblearn@iue.edu for access to the documentary.

Morris has an extensive background.

She is also the author of Black Stats: African Americans by the Numbers in the Twenty-First Century (The New Press, 2014), Too Beautiful for Words (MWM Books, 2012), and she worked with Kemba Smith on her book, Poster Child: The Kemba Smith Story (IBJ Book Publishing, 2011). Morris has written dozens of articles, book chapters, and other publications on social justice issues and lectured widely on research, policies, and practices associated with improving juvenile/criminal justice, educational, and socioeconomic conditions for girls and women of color.

Her 2018 TED Talk on how to stop the criminalization of Black girls in schools has received more than 1.8 million views and been translated into 18 languages.

Morris served as an adjunct associate professor for Saint Mary's College of California between 2013-2018 and has taught at the University of San Francisco and California State University, Sacramento. She is a 2012 Soros Justice Fellow, the former vice president for Economic Programs, Advocacy and Research at the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and the former director of research for the Thelton E. Henderson Center for Social Justice at the UC Berkeley Law School.

She has worked in partnership with and served as a consultant for federal, state and county agencies, national academic and research institutions, and communities throughout the nation to develop research, comprehensive approaches and training curricula to eliminate racial/ethnic and gender disparities in justice and educational systems. Her work in this area has informed the development and implementation of improved culturally competent and gender-responsive continua of services for youth.

Her work has been profiled by MSNBC, CSPAN2, The Washington Post, The New York Times, NPR, and PBS, among other national and local print, radio, and television media. Morris' research intersects race, gender, education and justice to explore the ways in which Black communities, and other communities of color, are uniquely affected by social policies. She also frequently lectures on the life and legacy of the artist Prince.

Boys & Girls Club of Wayne County Names New CEO

Posted September 29, 2021

The Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County has named Alicia Painter as their new Chief Executive Officer (CEO). Mrs. Painter becomes only the fourth leader and first female leader of the organization in its 64-year history. Alicia will follow long-time Executive Director Bruce Daggy as he retires in December 2021 after a long 29-year career with the Club. Alicia will take over starting in January 2022.

Supplied Photo:  Alicia Painter
Supplied Photo: Alicia Painter

The Executive Committee and Search Committee stated, "This was a long process and we had over 100 candidates that we screened. We believe Alicia will make a great CEO for our organization and lead us into the next decade of youth development and after school programming for the youth in Wayne County."

Alicia is a graduate of Earlham College where she was a Bonner Scholar. She has been with the Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County for 10 years serving in several roles including a Camp Director, Program Director, Unit Director, Sr. Unit Director and currently the Director of Operations. She has also served on the United Way Vision Council for Juvenile Delinquency and on the Lemonade Day Board. Alicia stated that she believes in the mission of the Boys & Girls Club and is eager to serve in this new role. Alicia lives in Richmond with her husband Alex and their three children.

The Executive Committee also named Jennifer Feaster as the new Chief Financial Officer (CFO) starting in January. Jennifer has been with the Club for 19 years as their Director of Financial Administration. Both Mrs. Painter and Mrs. Feaster have been a part of the Executive Team of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County overseeing all operations and administration aspects of the Club. They are excited about the opportunity to continue to work as a team with the Board of Directors to make the Boys & Girls Club the leader in youth development programs and addressing the needs of our young people.

The mission of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County is to enable all young people, especially those who need us most, to reach their full potential as productive, caring, and responsible citizens. Members of the Club, ages 6-18, have access to dedicated, trained professionals who provide guidance in adopting healthy lifestyles and pursuing educational objectives. Currently, the Club serves over 3,000 youth at five locations: the Jeffers, McDaniel, First Bank, Western Wayne, and Hagerstown units and during the summer at our 168-acre Camp Guy located on the Whitewater River. Since 1957, the Club has been striving to equip young people with the skills they need to succeed in life. For more information, visit www.bgcrichmond.org.

Call for Entries! 123rd Annual RAM Exhibition

Posted September 29, 2021

Supplied Graphic:  RAM's 123rd ExhibitionFor more than a century, artist have exhibited their artwork at the Richmond Art Museum.

Today, this juried art show gives artists who are currently living in Indiana or Ohio the chance to exhibit their work at the Richmond Art Museum.

Thanks to RAM's generous sponsors and art afficionados, approximately $20,000 in prizes & purchase awards are handed out. Each year, pieces are selected for inclusion in the Annual Exhibition by a juror.

Important Dates:

  • October 1st: Postmark Deadline for Entry
    (Entry Fee includes up to two (2) artworks)
  • October 7, 8 & 9th 9 am - 4 pm: Works delivered to RAM
  • October 28, 29, & 30th: 10 am - 5 pm: Pick-up unaccepted works
  • November 4th, 7 pm: Virtual Awards Ceremony
    (Show will be open to the public after November 4th, however the awards ceremony will be virtual.)
  • January 8th: Exhibition Closes
  • January 13, 14 & 15th, 10 am - 5 pm: Pick-up all artwork

Download the 2021 Prospectus and Entry Form Here!

Richmond Shakespeare Festival in Richmond, Indiana presents
BECOMING OTHELLO: A Black Girl's Journey

Posted September 29, 2021

Written & Performed by Debra Ann Byrd, (Founding Artistic Director of New York's Harlem Shakespeare Festival)

Supplied Photo:  Debra Ann Byrd in Becoming Othello: A Black Girl's JourneyBECOMING OTHELLO is a personal, poignant and powerful story of perseverance, tragedy, triumph—and ultimately unconditional love. A victory story of making it against all odds. Through rhyme, meter, moving multimedia images, lyrical language, and soulful songs, this choreo-poem chronicles the life of classical actress, Debra Ann Byrd; her trials and triumphs with race and the classics; and her gender-flipped journey on the road to becoming Shakespeare's noble flawed general Othello.

DETAILS
  • When: Friday, October 15th & Saturday, October 16th, 2021
  • Where: Reid Memorial Presbyterian Church, 1004 N A St, Richmond, IN 47374
  • Time: 7:30 PM Both Nights
  • Tickets: $12 Adults/$6 Students
  • Bonus: After each performance there is a talkback with the artist!

Social distancing and masks are required for this performance. Vaccinations are strongly recommended.

For tickets go to www.richmondshakes.org and click on the Becoming Othello link.

New COVID-19 Vaccination Location Opens Thursday

Posted September 29, 2021

Reid Health's new COVID-19 vaccination clinic on Richmond's west side will open for its first day Thursday.

The new site located at Reid Plaza sits one door down from Reid's PACE Center, 2300 National Road W., but is a separate operation. PACE Center staff cannot schedule appointments for the vaccination clinic or administer the vaccine.

The vaccination clinic replaces the one that Reid has operated at the Kuhlman Center on the Wayne County Fairgrounds since mid-January. Operating hours at the new location will remain 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Thursday, noon-4 p.m. Friday, and 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday.

Appointments are preferred, but walk-ins are available. Indiana residents should go to ourshot.in.gov to schedule their free vaccinations at any Reid site or other locations such as county health departments and area pharmacies.

The state of Indiana has designated 211 as the number to call if you need help in scheduling an appointment.

Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov to see a list of their available locations and make an appointment.

The new site located at Reid Plaza sits one door down from Reid's PACE Center, 2300 National Road W., but is a separate operation. PACE Center staff cannot schedule appointments for the vaccination clinic or administer the vaccine.

Reid's other recent vaccination site addition continues to be popular. The clinic on the main concourse of Reid Health Hospital has administered some 462 vaccines since it opened Sept. 13. That includes record highs in the past two days of nearly 100 doses given a day.

Located next to the Home Medical Equipment store, the vaccine site at the hospital is open 6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Walk-ins are welcome, but appointments can be made through the state website.

The Reid Plaza clinic uses the Pfizer vaccine, which anyone 12 years and older can receive. Parents or legal guardians of minor children who will be vaccinated need to be present at the time of vaccination.

Both the one-dose Johnson & Johnson and the two-dose Pfizer vaccines are available at the hospital main concourse site. Only those 18 and older can receive the Johnson & Johnson vaccine.

Today's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 45
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 35 (77.8%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 9
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 8 (88.9%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 8
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 8 (100%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 427
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 55 (12.9% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 15

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Booster Shots Available at All Reid COVID-19 Vaccination Sites

Posted September 29, 2021

If you are among those newly eligible for a booster dose of Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine, you can sign up now for an appointment to get the extra shot at Reid Health's vaccination locations.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently approved booster shots for some groups of people who received the Pfizer vaccine at least six months ago.

Those eligible for a booster dose include:

  • Anyone 65 years and older
  • Those 18 years and older who have underlying medical conditions such as cancer; chronic kidney, liver, lung, or heart conditions; diabetes; pregnancy; obesity; HIV; and more
  • Those 18 and older who work in high-risk settings such as first responders (healthcare workers, firefighters, police), long-term care, education, food and agriculture, manufacturing, prisons and jails, public transit, U.S Postal Service, and grocery stores
  • Those 18 and older who live in high-risk settings

Studies have suggested protection against infection and mild illness given by the COVID-19 vaccine may decrease over time, although the vaccines continue to perform very well in preventing severe illness and death. Data has shown the Pfizer booster shot increases a person's immune response, helping their bodies to better prevent infection.

For now, only the Pfizer vaccine has been approved for a booster dose and only for the specific groups listed above. The CDC says others who received the Pfizer vaccine and those who received the Moderna and Johnson & Johnson vaccines will likely need a booster as well, but more data is needed first.

Before last week's booster shot news, those who are moderately to severely immunocompromised already had been given approval for an extra dose of the two-shot Pfizer or Moderna vaccine. That third dose should come at least 28 days after the second.

The CDC recommends people talk with their healthcare provider about their particular medical condition and whether an additional vaccine dose is appropriate for them.

Free vaccinations are available at a number of nearby locations. Indiana residents can find sites and sign up for an appointment by going to . Ohio residents shouourshot.in.govld use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.

For now, only the Pfizer vaccine has been approved for a booster dose and only for the specific groups listed above. The CDC says others who received the Pfizer vaccine and those who received the Moderna and Johnson & Johnson vaccines will likely need a booster as well, but more data is needed first.

Today's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 56
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 45 (80.4%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 10
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 9 (90%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 8
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 8 (100%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 359
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 37 (10.3% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 20

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

IU East's Career Services Encourages Alumni, Students to Seek Employment Through Handshake

Posted September 29, 2021

Supplied Graphic:  Handshake
IU East Office of Career Services offers Handshake to connect students and alumni to job listings and internship opportunities tailored to their degree program and career interests.
The Indiana University East Office of Career Services is ready and eager to help current students and alumni throughout their academic career and beyond.

Career Services is using a new online platform, Handshake, to connect students and alumni to potential employers. Over the past year since Handshake has been in use, the number of participants has continued to increase, and the department expects this to be a continuing trend.

Within a year, 844 students and alumni have activated their accounts with IU East Career Services.

Handshake is a free online service where students can view job listings and internship opportunities tailored to their degree program and career interests. Students may sign up for events such as career fairs and schedule appointments with Career Services through Handshake.

The senior account activation rate totaled 22.7 percent-9.7 percent above peer institutions. Profile completion between undergraduates, graduates, and alumni totaled 21 percent-15.4 percent above peer institutions.

But even with job listings at their fingertips, wading through job searches and preparing to enter the professional world can be intimidating. That's why Career Services encourages students to reach out and take advantage of their assistance.

The Office of Career Services provides students a chance to develop their professional skills through free workshops and career coaching. They also assist students with finding the right internships and employment opportunities.

One of the most important aspects to Career Services is the personal attention they devote to students.

Students are treated as individuals. It is important for students to start networking with Career Services and to let them know what sort of career path they are interested in so they can be provided with an individualized experience once something is available on Handshake.

Career Service Specialist Kara Bellew offers that individual support and dedicates her time to meeting with students and providing valuable feedback on how to develop and improve their professional skills.

Handshake was initiated on campus by Bellew and former director of Career Services, Sally Saydshoev.

IU East student-athlete Joao Vitor de Lima appreciates the personal assistance he has received from Career Services and Bellew. He is from Curitiba, Brazil. He is a senior who is majoring in finance with a minor in economics, and first reached out to Career Services at the end of his sophomore year in 2019.

"They prepared me for interviews," Lima said. He appreciates the help he received when building his resume. "Kara helped me a lot with the way I should portray my resume."

Lima said that she took the time to help him learn about ideal resume layouts and using action verbs to describe his work experience."They have been very, very helpful when it comes to getting ready for being face-to-face with a recruiter. That's how they helped me the most."

He added that the support Career Services provided was a major factor toward obtaining his remote internship with the Indiana Economic Development Corporation in Indianapolis. At his internship, Lima had the opportunity to help evaluate applications for a program that provides relief to small businesses.

Alex Hakes of Yorktown, Indiana, is a senior double-majoring in Political Science and Spanish. He is also pursuing a double minor in Economics and International Relations. Hakes reached out to Career Services during his second semester for resume advice and assistance in tracking down internship opportunities.

"Career Services has helped me gain so many professional experiences that I wouldn't have been able to find on my own," said Hakes. "Kara is amazing, and she is always looking for new opportunities to tell me about."

Hakes was able to connect with The Partnership for Public Service, a non-profit organization with a mission to "build a better government and a stronger democracy." He is currently an intern with the federal workforce team.

Both Lima and Hakes used Handshake to aid their search for internship opportunities and applauded the Office of Career Services for their use of the platform.

"Career Services helped me utilize many platforms, specifically Handshake, to find employers looking for interns," Hakes said. "With Handshake, the application process was seamless and so easy to navigate."

Lima agreed the online platform helps ease the job finding process.

"I think it's a great tool," Lima said. "It really shows that they're keeping up with technology."

IU East is no stranger to virtual innovation. With IU East's expansive online program, Career Services encourages distance education students to reach out to their department too.

Career Services finds opportunities and makes connections with online students as well.

Bellew said she has met with distance education students and successfully found remote internships and student-worker positions that fit within the students' career goals.

Career Services wants students and alumni to connect with the office, to have a conversation and to know that there is support at IU East for them to be successful.

To connect with an IU East career coach or for more information, visit iue.edu/career.

COVID-19 Vaccination Site Moving from Kuhlman Center to Reid Plaza

Posted September 29, 2021

Reid Health's main COVID-19 vaccination clinic is moving this week to another convenient location on Richmond's west side.

Since mid-January, Reid has operated a public vaccination site at the Kuhlman Center on the Wayne County Fairgrounds. Starting Thursday, that clinic will instead be run out of a space at Reid Plaza, one door down from Reid's PACE Center, 2300 National Road W.

Operating hours will remain the same with the site open 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Thursday, noon-4 p.m. Friday, and 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday.

When demand for COVID-19 vaccinations was high earlier this year, the Kuhlman Center was an ideal location for Reid's clinic. As demand decreased throughout the spring, Reid moved into a smaller office space at the building.

With last week's approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for booster shots for some vaccinated people, it's anticipated high demand will return, leading to the need once again for a larger space for the clinic.

The new site at Reid Plaza offers a bigger location without having to inconvenience any activities already planned for the Kuhlman Center in the coming weeks and months.

Starting Thursday, the vaccination clinic at the Kuhlman Center will instead be run out of a space at Reid Plaza, one door down from Reid's PACE Center, 2300 National Road W. in Richmond.

Appointments at the new location are preferred, but walk-ins are available. Indiana residents can go to ourshot.in.gov to schedule their free vaccinations at any Reid site or other locations such as county health departments and area pharmacies.

Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov to see a list of their vaccination sites and make an appointment.

The Reid Plaza site uses the Pfizer vaccine, which anyone 12 years and older can receive. Parents or legal guardians of minor children who will be vaccinated need to be present at the time of vaccination.

Today's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 59
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 48 (81.4%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 12
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 11 (91.7%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 11
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 10 (90.9%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 771
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 117 (15.2% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 16

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Reid Police Officer Graduates From Academy With 'Top Gun' Award

Posted September 29, 2021

Supplied Photo:  Reid Health President/CEO Craig Kinyon (left) issues the oath of office to new police officer Dereck Tipton during a swearing-in ceremony in July 2021.When Officer Dereck Tipton graduated from the Indiana Law Enforcement Academy on Friday, he became the first member of the Reid Health Police Department to do so while also earning an award for his skill with a firearm.

Tipton received the "Top Gun" honor for his firearms scores during academy training over the past eight weeks.

"Officers who have the skills work very hard to get this award," said Randy Kolentus, Reid's Chief of Police. "We're proud of the work Dereck has put in and his accomplishments."

Tipton was Reid's lone graduate from the academy's latest class, setting the stage for the completion of Reid's transition from a security team to a police department later this year.

Officers Cody Hahn, Cody Frame, and Troy McCauley are scheduled to begin their training at the academy next month and graduate in December.

"We're so close now to the culmination of nearly two years of work," Kolentus said.

Reid began to transform its security team to a police department early last year, joining other health systems around the state. The move is intended to enhance the security and safety of those who use Reid services.

"Officers who have the skills work very hard to get this award. We're proud of the work Dereck has put in and his accomplishments." -- Randy Kolentus, Reid Health Chief of Police

The change reflects the growth of the health system and the accompanying increase in the need for police assistance. When the intention to establish the department first was announced, Kolentus noted the Richmond Police Department responded to Reid calls almost 900 times in 2019.

The former Security Department has grown from nine officers in 2016 to more than 20 team members today as Reid's geographic footprint has increased and its number of staff has risen to some 3,400 people.

"We're grateful for everything our officers' families do so our guys can be gone for two months to attend the academy," Kolentus said. "It's not easy. We could not have made this transition without their support."

Demand Increases for Monoclonal Antibody Infusions for COVID-19 Patients

Posted September 29, 2021

The latest surge in the COVID-19 pandemic has led to increased demand for Reid Health's monoclonal antibody infusions, a treatment approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for those who are considered high risk for developing severe illness from the virus.

Monoclonal antibodies are laboratory-produced molecules that can restore, enhance, or mimic the immune system's attack on cells. They are designed to block viral attachment and entry into human cells, neutralizing the virus.

The FDA has given Emergency Use Authorization for monoclonal antibodies for use in adults and pediatric patients who are at least 12 years of age, who weigh at least 88 pounds, and who are at high risk for severe COVID-19.

Under the EUA, being high risk means meeting at least one of the following criteria:

  • Being at least 65 years old
  • Having a body mass index (BMI) of at least 35
  • Being pregnant
  • Having chronic kidney disease
  • Having diabetes
  • Having an immunosuppressive disease
  • Currently receiving an immunosuppressive treatment
  • Having cardiovascular disease or hypertension
  • Having chronic lung diseases
  • Having sickle cell disease
  • Having neurodevelopmental disorders or conditions that confer medical complexity
  • Having a medical-related technological dependence (for example, tracheostomy, gastrostomy, or positive pressure ventilation)

For those who qualify, monoclonal antibodies can be used to treat mild to moderate symptoms of COVID-19. Treatment can be provided up to 10 days after the onset of symptoms, but best results are seen when it is administered within about four days.

If you meet the criteria for a monoclonal antibody infusion, don't wait until you feel poorly to talk with your physician as the treatment is less effective the later it is given. Also, once you qualify for hospital admission, you no longer meet the requirements for monoclonal antibody treatment.

Reid has set up a temporary clinic for its infusions in Reid Plaza on National Road West in Richmond, just two doors down from the Reid Health PACE Center.

Patients need a physician's referral to get an appointment. If a referral is needed on the weekends, call Reid's COVID-19 hotline at (765) 965-4200. The hotline is available 8 a.m.-8 p.m. seven days a week. Staff will be able to help you find the most efficient way to obtain a referral and answer any questions you might have about monoclonal antibody infusions.

Today's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 76
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 63 (82.9%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 14
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 13 (92.9%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 11
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 11 (100%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 268
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 53 (19.8% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 30

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

The 4th Street Fair Celebrates 40 Years

Posted September 23, 2021

Logo: 4th Street FairJoin Senior Opportunities Services (SOS) in celebrating the 40th anniversary of the 4th Street Fair in Richmond, Indiana. The fair will run along South 4th Street, between South A and E Streets, from 10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. on Saturday, October 2 and Sunday, October 3, 2021.

Explore the stunning architecture of the Old Richmond Historic District, shop with over 100 arts and crafts vendors, enjoy the fun family-friendly activities, and feast on the delicious offerings provided by our food vendors.

This year's fair will include FREE live music and entertainment on both days. There will be seating areas to not only to connect with your friends, but also to relax and eat. We'll also have a few surprises in store for the young and young at heart!

In celebration of the 40th anniversary, limited edition 4th Street Fair Commemorative Tote Bags and Historic Old Richmond Coloring Books will also be available.

Come out and support our artisans while supporting the services offered by SOS. This is a rain or shine event.

This year's fair promises to provide an invigorated and renewed atmosphere thanks to the outstanding support of our volunteers and community sponsors.

Volunteers are still needed, in addition to donations of gift baskets for the raffle tent.

For more details visit 4thStreetFair.com or call 765-962-1010.

Immunocompromised Can Get a Third COVID-19 Vaccine Dose Now

Posted September 23, 2021

While final details and approvals are worked out concerning COVID-19 vaccine booster shots, there is one group of people who already are eligible to receive an extra dose.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) now recommends moderately to severely immunocompromised people who received the two-dose Pfizer or Modera vaccine get a third shot at least 28 days after their second dose.

Those with compromised immune systems are at a high risk for severe COVID-19 illness, and even if vaccinated, their bodies might not build the same level of immunity to the regular two-dose series as those who aren't immunocompromised. A third dose is intended to provide greater protection against the virus.

Among the examples given by the CDC of those who are moderately to severely immunocompromised are anyone who has:

  • Been receiving active cancer treatment for tumors or cancers of the blood,
  • Received an organ transplant and is taking medication to suppress the immune system,
  • Received a stem cell transplant within the past two years or is taking medication to suppress the immune system,
  • Moderate or severe primary immunodeficiency (such as DiGeorge syndrome or Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome),
  • Advanced or untreated HIV infection, and
  • Active treatment with high-dose corticosteroids or other drugs that might suppress the immune system.

The CDC recommends people talk with their healthcare provider about their particular medical condition and whether the additional dose is appropriate for them.

Those with compromised immune systems are at a high risk for severe COVID-19 illness, and even if vaccinated, their bodies might not build the same level of immunity to the regular two-dose series as those who aren't immunocompromised. A third dose is intended to provide greater protection against the virus.

Free vaccinations are available at a number of nearby locations. Indiana residents can find sites and sign up for an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.

Those who received either the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine should get a third dose of the same vaccine. If the same vaccine isn't available, either of the mRNA vaccines can be used.

At this point, the CDC's extra-dose recommendation for immunocompromised people does not include those who received the Johnson & Johnson vaccine. The CDC says there isn't enough data at this time to determine if another dose of that vaccine would improve results.

If you have questions about the vaccine, call Reid Health's COVID-19 hotline at (765) 965-4200. The hotline is available 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. seven days a week to help with scheduling a test, receiving test results, and clinical advice. Since the hotline was established on Aug. 26, more than 5,400 community members have taken advantage of the service.

Today's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 77
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 64 (83.1%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 13
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 13 (100%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 13
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 13 (100%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 365
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 62 (17% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 17

Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Local Volunteers Honored with Golden Hoosier Award

Posted September 23, 2021

Linda Morris of Parker City, Jan Bronnenberg of Anderson, and Edna Cox of Richmond were three of 21 older adults to receive the Golden Hoosier Award from the State of Indiana at a virtual ceremony on Wednesday, September 15. The Golden Hoosier Award acknowledges outstanding Indiana senior citizens for the impact they have made on the lives of others and their entire community. The award is the highest honor given to a senior in Indiana.

Jan Bronnenberg was one of two recipients of the LifeStream Golden Hoosier Award, and Linda Morris and Edna Cox were both recognized as runner-up candidates for the LifeStream Golden Hoosier Award. Additional honorees of the LifeStream Golden Hoosier Award include Jane Ann Runyon of Portland, and Ann Herman of Richmond. The LifeStream Golden Hoosier Award is announced in the Spring and acknowledges outstanding volunteerism among senior citizens in LifeStream's 12 county service area including Blackford, Delaware, Fayette, Franklin, Grant, Henry, Jay, Madison, Randolph, Rush, Union, and Wayne counties. LifeStream then nominates the recipients and runner-up candidates for the statewide Golden Hoosier Award.

Linda Morris, a retired teacher of 33 years in rural Randolph County, Ind., is devoted to giving back to her community. One cause in particular that is close to her heart is the Historic Farmland USA Community Center. Linda has been a board member since 2018 and is now the president. She not only oversees the daily operations, but is continuously seeking opportunities to enhance the programs and the senior center. Additionally, Linda worked with a group to re-establish the only senior center in Randolph County in 2019 where she has been instrumental in establish its 501c(3) status.

At 86 years old Edna Cox spends her time giving back to her community. Her volunteer work includes 15 years with the Wayne County 4H Fair where she assists in judging and donates items for crafting for 4H and the Special Clovers. Additionally, Edna has volunteered at the Centerville-Abington Senior Center with LifeStream's meal program for nearly 20 years. She helps with home-delivered meals to homebound senior citizens and assists in delivery of food with the LifeStream-Gleaners monthly food distribution. When asked why she volunteers Edna stated: "I do what someone needs and sometimes I don't think I do enough. I love helping others. That is what life is all about – doing for others!"

Get Your COVID-19 Questions Answered Live Thursday Night

Posted September 23, 2021

If you have questions about vaccinations or anything else related to COVID-19, you can get them answered live Thursday night during a special presentation of Whitewater Community Television's "IN Focus" program.

The show will feature a trio of physicians, including Thomas Huth, M.D., Vice President of Medical Affairs for Reid Health; David Jetmore, M.D., Wayne County Health Officer; and Paul Rider, M.D., Wayne County Health Board President.

Huth and Jetmore were the featured guests of WCTV's "Ask the Doctors" program that ran for some 65 weeks from the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic through the middle of June. The duo has been featured on "IN Focus" twice since "Ask the Doctors" ended.

If you have a question you'd like to have answered during Thursday's program, it can be emailed to WCTV at WCTV@iue.edu by 5 p.m. Thursday. During the show, questions can be posed by asking on the WCTV Facebook page or by sending them via Twitter to @WCTVinfo.

"IN Focus" airs Thursdays at 6 p.m. on WGTV, Channel 11 on Comcast cable in Wayne County. Those who live outside Wayne County or who don't have Comcast can watch the show live on WCTV's Facebook page as well as on WGTV Online.

Replays can be seen on WGTV, Channel 11, Thursday at 10:30 p.m., Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 8 a.m. and 9 p.m., and Sunday at 8 a.m. and 1 p.m. Audio-only replays can be heard Sunday mornings on G101.3 and sister station ESPN Radio 1490 & 100.9 WKBV. A recording of the program also is available on WGTV Online in the "Video on Demand" section.

Today's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 87
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 71 (81.6%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 15
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 14 (93.3%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 9
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 9 (100%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 409
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 55 (13.4% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 29
Unvaccinated, as defined by the CDC, includes anyone who either has not received a dose or has received only the first of a two-dose vaccine.

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Changes Coming to Reid Health's Administrative Team

Posted September 22, 2021

Reid Health has added two members to its administrative team, part of a handful of changes coming to the health system's leadership.

Michelle McClurg recently was promoted to the role of Vice President/Chief Patient Experience Officer and Pamela Jones joined Reid as Vice President/General Counsel.

McClurg came to Reid in 2001 and last served as Food & Nutrition Services Director until moving to Director of Patient Experience in 2013.

She is a clinical dietitian with a degree in dietetics from Ball State University and a master's in family and consumer services, also from Ball State.

McClurg will continue to oversee the Call Center, Innovations, Volunteer and Chaplain Services, Information Desk, and Switchboard teams and in her new role will add Patient Transportation and Food & Nutrition Services.

Jones comes to Reid from the Midland Health system in Midland, Texas, where she has worked in a similar role since 2019. Before that, she was part of the Franciscan Health system in Indiana. In total, Jones brings to Reid more than 20 years of experience in healthcare.

She has a bachelor's in psychology from Purdue University and earned her law degree from Indiana University.

Her initial duties will include management of legal matters for Reid as well as administrative responsibility for the Reid Health Police Department, Reid Health Physician Associates Contracting, and Risk Management.

Other changes coming to Reid's administrative team include the eventual retirement of a longtime leader of the Reid Health Foundation and the return of a former member of the foundation's staff.

Randy Kirk, who has served in leadership positions at the Reid Foundation since 1997, plans to retire at the end of September 2022. Kirk began his time with Reid as the foundation's executive director and currently serves as Vice President/Foundation President.

He has a bachelor's in natural resources and biology from Ball State and master's degrees in natural resources and business management, also from Ball State.

Former foundation director Jason Troutwine will return to Reid as a Vice President in January. In his new role, Troutwine will oversee Volunteers, Marketing & Communications, Community Outreach, and Community Benefit.

Upon Kirk's retirement, Troutwine also will assume responsibility for the Reid Foundation.

Troutwine's first stint with Reid began in 2004 as a Development Associate before he became the manager and eventually the director of the foundation.

He currently is the Vice Chancellor for External Affairs at his alma mater, Indiana University East. He has served in the role since 2014, providing oversight of the campus' marketing, communications, web development, public affairs and government relations, advancement, alumni relations, event planning, and community engagement programs.

Rehabilitation Services Help Patient Recover from COVID-19

Posted September 22, 2021

When Pam Hall lost consciousness, it was November. The next time she woke up, everything had changed.

She was no longer at Reid Health Hospital. She wasn't even in Richmond.

Fall had given way to winter. The holiday season had come and gone. A new year had just begun.

Two months had passed since Hall had last opened her eyes.

"I had a hard time conceiving how long I had been out," she said.

Because of COVID-19, Hall would spend a total of five months in various hospitals and face a long road to recovery. When she began therapy at Reid's Acute Rehabilitation Unit, she couldn't stand on her own and the range of motion in her arms was limited, among other problems.

But in the weeks and months that followed, Reid staff guided her toward improvement.

"All the nurses, aides, and therapists, everyone I've had has been great," Hall said. "I can't say enough about all of them. They're so giving and personal and have done so much for me."

For the first week after she tested positive for COVID-19, the Cambridge City resident and mother of three dealt with the illness at home. But when her oxygen level started dropping, she went to Reid's Emergency Department where she was admitted to the hospital.

Three days later, Hall was sedated and put on a ventilator. As her condition worsened, she eventually was transferred to one and then another Indianapolis hospital, where she finally recovered enough to be removed from the ventilator.

Another month passed before Hall returned to Reid to begin her rehabilitation. Pain and stiffness in her arms and legs left her unable to do much for herself.

"I had a really hard time because I was frustrated," Hall said. "I couldn't do anything. I was dependent on so many people."

Supplied Photo: Pam Hall
Pam Hall continues to attend rehab sessions at Reid Health as part of the Pulmonary Rehab maintenance program as she recovers from COVID-19.

Three hours a day of therapy -- a combination of occupational, physical, and speech -- began with the initial goal of being able to stand and walk again. That task was made more difficult by extreme neuropathy in her left foot.

"They would try to stretch me out, but it hurt so bad," Hall said. "Every day I just kept thinking I've got to push myself further and further."

About two weeks in, she finally was able to stand and take a couple of steps with the assistance of parallel bars ("That was just unbelievable," she said). After another two weeks, she took six steps.

"I was crying because I could finally see I was showing some improvement," Hall said. "They kept telling me it was going to come. They were so encouraging, but they also pushed me when they knew I needed to be pushed."

A new illness -- C. diff, possibly caused by her long hospital stay -- impeded her improvement and jeopardized her time in the rehab unit, but Reid staff worked to make sure she could stay for another five weeks.

"That's the reason I'm walking today," Hall said.

Staff did more than just take care of her physical needs. Knowing Hall usually colored her hair, one therapist bought a box of dye and then she and a nurse did Hall's hair for her.

"It was just little things like that to try to lift my spirits, not only taking care of my body but taking care of me," Hall said.

By the time she left the ARU, Hall could care for herself again, getting around with the help of a walker. A COVID-caused blood clot about a month later necessitated a return trip to the hospital and forced her ongoing therapy to be paused for several weeks.

Nearly a year after catching COVID-19, Hall's journey to recovery continues with four days a week of therapy as part of Reid's Pulmonary Rehab maintenance program. She's walking without assistance but with a light brace on her left leg. Her lung function has improved -- Pulmonary Rehab staff helped her go from needing four liters of oxygen to 0.5 -- but she still needs oxygen for daily activity.

"I still get frustrated," Hall said. "I want to be able to do the things I want to do. There were things I missed that I won't be able to get back.

"But I've definitely made big strides since April, and I'm grateful for everything the Reid team has done to help me get this far."

"To anyone who thinks COVID isn't real, I would say just live a day in my shoes. I get frustrated and wish people would just get vaccinated. ... Everyone should know anyone can have major complications no matter how healthy you are." -- Pam Hall

COVID has left Hall with a high resting heart rate for which she takes medication. She'll be on blood thinners for the rest of her life, and the neuropathy in her left foot causes constant pain. She's unsure if she'll ever be able to go without extra oxygen.

"To anyone who thinks COVID isn't real, I would say just live a day in my shoes. I get frustrated and wish people would just get vaccinated," said Hall, who was vaccinated during her recovery.

"I took it seriously. I wore a mask and tried to follow all the protocols, but I was more afraid I would give it to my parents than I was afraid of getting it myself. Since I was a healthy adult, I believed if I got it, I wouldn't have major complications.

"Everyone should know anyone can have major complications no matter how healthy you are."

Today's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 86
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 70 (81.4%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 14
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 14 (100%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 10
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 10 (100%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 418
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 40 (9.6% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 29

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

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