News Releases

Foundation Set to Award $275,000 in 2021 Challenge Match

Forty Local Nonprofit Organizations Selected to Participate

Posted September 20, 2021

The Wayne County Foundation is pleased to announce that forty local nonprofit organizations have been selected to participate in the 2021 Challenge Match. This year marks the tenth consecutive year the Foundation has offered this initiative, dating back to 2012.

The Challenge Match is a community-wide fundraising effort that affords local nonprofits the opportunity to raise operating dollars, and to secure a dollar-for-dollar match from the Foundation. Over its history, the Challenge Match has proven to be philanthropic force in Wayne County, providing a highly-visible way to encourage charitable giving in our community. This year, $275,000 match dollars will be made available for the program. 2021 Match partners for include the Doxpop Charitable Giving Fund, First Bank Community Fund, Second Chance Fund, and David and Carla Stidham.

Last year, the Challenge Match generated over $1.83 million for the selected nonprofits. This number included $265,000 match dollars made available by the Foundation and other match partners.

"Challenge Match has always been about helping our local nonprofit partners build long-term sustainability," said Rebecca Gilliam, Wayne County Foundation executive director. "We relish the opportunity to come alongside these organizations to help them with their all-important work. We would also like to thank our generous match partners, all of whom recognize that strong local nonprofits mean making our community a better place to live."

The forty participating organizations will have the opportunity to receive funding from the Foundation up to their match goal, based on gifts they receive from the community during the match period, which will run from November 1 through November 9, 2021. Please direct any questions about qualifying gifts to the Wayne County Foundation at 765-962-1638.

The following organizations have been selected to participate in the Wayne County Foundation's 2021 Challenge Match:

Supplied Table:  Wayne County Foundation's 2021 Challenge Match Participants

The Wayne County Foundation exists to foster and encourage private philanthropic giving, to enhance the spirit of community and to improve the quality of life in the Wayne County, Indiana, area now and for future generations.

COVID-19 Vaccination Site on Reid's Main Campus Popular in Its First Week

Posted September 20, 2021

In its first week of operation, Reid Health's COVID-19 vaccination site on the health system's main campus in Richmond proved to be a popular place.

Some 156 of the 370 vaccine doses administered at Reid sites last week came at the new location on the main concourse of the hospital next to the Home Medical Equipment store.

COVID-19 vaccinations are available there 6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Walk-ins are welcome, but appointments can be made through Indiana's COVID-19 vaccination website, ourshot.in.gov.

Patients already present for outpatient services also are offered the opportunity to receive a vaccine during their visit.

All persons receiving the vaccine are required to remain for a 15-minute observation period.

Those who get their vaccination at the new location will receive a card good for a free drink and snack at the Espresso Bar or at the Café at 1200.

As a reminder, a door screening is required to enter the hospital, and a surgical mask will be provided for entry. Cloth masks are no longer acceptable at Reid facilities.

Some 156 of the 370 vaccine doses administered at Reid sites last week came at the new location on the main concourse of the hospital next to the Home Medical Equipment store.

Both the one-dose Johnson & Johnson and the two-dose Pfizer vaccines are available at this site. Other Reid vaccination sites use only the Pfizer product.

Anyone 12 years and older can receive the Pfizer vaccine while those wanting Johnson & Johnson must be at least 18. Parents or legal guardians of minor children who will be vaccinated need to be present at the time of vaccination.

Those who opt for the Pfizer version will be scheduled for their second dose at either Reid's vaccination clinic at the Kuhlman Center on the Wayne County Fairgrounds or Reid's Residency Clinic on Sim Hodgin Parkway.

In addition to Reid's public vaccination sites, county health departments and pharmacies throughout Reid's service area are offering COVID-19 vaccinations. To see the list of options and schedule an appointment, Indiana residents should go to ourshot.in.gov while Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.

Today's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 86
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 68 (79.1%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 15
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 14 (93.3%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 11
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 11 (100%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 916
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 178 (19.4% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 27

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

2021 East-Central Indiana Business Survey Is Open Through September 24

Posted September 20, 2021

Thanks to the tremendous support from the local business communities, economic development corporations and chambers of commerce, we continued to have great success last year for our East-Central Indiana Business Survey. Based on the valuable responses we collected, we had successfully calculated the 2020 value of our IU East Regional Business Confidence Index. Our report had been released on the IU East Business and Economic Research Center (the BERC) website at http://www.iue.edu/business/berc/.

The BERC of the School of Business and Economics at Indiana University East is again working together with the local economic development corporations/groups or the like and chambers of commerce in conducting the 2021 annual business survey for the East-Central Indiana region.

The survey will be open to businesses/companies in the Fayette, Franklin, Henry, Randolph, Rush, Union, and Wayne counties from September 13, 2021 to September 24, 2021. Results of the survey will not only help the BERC maintain the IU East Regional Business Confidence Index to monitor the business sentiment and economic trend in our region, but also assist further the local and regional economic studies conducted by the BERC.

In addition, the survey results might aid the aforementioned economic development corporations/groups or the like and chambers of commerce for consideration as part of any future strategic planning and economic development efforts to facilitate a healthy business climate in the region.

Responses to the 10-minute survey will be confidential. Business owners/managers will be asked to provide some general information on their business/company's demography, their opinion of various aspects related to business performance for this year, and their business and economic expectations for next year in their county. While the individual responses to the survey will not be shared, results of the research survey will be made public by the end of 2021.

For more information, contact the Director of the Business and Economic Research Center and Associate Professor of Finance Oi Lin (Irene) Cheung at (765) 973-8497 or ocheung@iue.edu.

About the IU East Business and Economic Research Center

The BERC is sponsored by the School of Business and Economics at IU East. The center is designed to assist in capturing and creating economic data that will be useful in supporting the economic vitality of the Eastern Indiana and Western Ohio regions.

Lively Arts Series Begins This September with Artist Talk, Music Concert

Posted September 20, 2021

Indiana University East's kicks off the Lively Arts Series this week with an artist talk and reception by Barbara Triscari from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. on Wednesday, September 15, in the Tom Thomas Gallery, located in Whitewater Hall.

Students, faculty, staff, and the community are welcome to attend Lively Arts Events. When events are held on campus, attendees are instructed to wear a mask while in the building.

Lively Arts is presented by First Bank Richmond in partnership with WCTV.

Fiber Expressions Art Exhibition

Triscari's quilt exhibition, "Fiber Expressions," is open now through October 1. Her artwork is one of two physical exhibitions planned for the IU East Gallery this fall.

The inspiration for Triscari's art comes from her travels as she has moved a total of 13 times in her life, so far. She has resided in nine states including the picturesque Alaska, lived for three years in Italy, and traveled to several foreign countries.

Throughout Triscari's travels she has had the chance to photograph and experience many different cultures. Her photography is incorporated in most of her art: either in print or in creating the designs of the pieces. She wants people to be curious about the subjects and photos in her pieces and want to look closely to see the details of a photo.

She enjoys sharing the experience and wonder she has had and moments she has captured with her photography. Triscari was the First Prize Winner of the 2020 Whitewater Valley Art Competition with her fiber art piece, La Chiesa di Bolzano Vicentino.

Duo Rouge presents the Flute Music of Nathan Froebe

The first Lively Arts Series concert of the fall semester, "Duo Rouge presents the Flute Music of Nathan Froebe," is on Monday, September 20.

The event includes a pre-concert talk by composer Nathan Froebe at 6:30 p.m., followed by the concert at 7 p.m. Froebe is a visiting assistant professor of music at IU East. The concert will be held live in Vivian Auditorium, located in Whitewater Hall. The concert is also available to watch on IU East Facebook Live: https://www.facebook.com/events/2856839863064852.

The concert features Jessica Raposo and Mihoko Watanabe, flutes, and Dianne Frazer, piano. They will perform music for flutes composed by Froebe, including the world premiere of his new work Triptych for 2 flutists (flute/piccolo/alto flute) and piano.

Froebe is a music educator, and conductor. He received his Doctor of Musical Arts from University of Wisconsin-Madison in Madison, Wisconsin. He received his Master of Liberal Studies in Music Composition from Fort Hays State University in Hays, Kansas. He received his Bachelor of Music Education from Pittsburg State University in Pittsburg, Kansas.

His works vary greatly in style, and nearly all contain programmatic narratives with a heavy emphasis on creative orchestration and motivic manipulation. Froebe's recent works have explored issues such as: addiction and recovery (Addiction's Actuality), immigration and national identity (A Mighty Woman with a Torch), and the narratives of being LGBT in today's society (In Paths Untrodden). His works have been featured at various North American Saxophone Alliance conferences, at Society of Composers, Inc. Regional Conferences, the 2017 National Flute Association Conference, and the 2018 International Trombone Festival. His work as a music educator in Florida recently earned him a quarter-finalist position for the 2020 Grammy Music Educator Award, and in the summer of 2020 he was named a resident fellow at the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts. Froebe also holds memberships in ASCAP, the Society of Composers, Inc., Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia, and Kappa Kappa Psi (honorary)

Froebe has performed at the New Music on the Bayou in Monroe, Louisiana, and the SCI Region VI 2019 Conference in Commerce, Texas. As a composer, his most recent works include Nocturnes and Symphony No.1 - Arc of the Rainbow for Wind Ensemble for the UW-Madison Wind Ensemble. He has also composed for the SATB Saxophone Quartet and SATB Choir, Virbaphone and Marimba. Froebe is the recipient of the 2019 Ithaca International Hecksher Foundation Composition Prize, received for his original work for a solo alto saxophone titled, Un/Controlled.

Raposo, flutist, is the music program coordinator and an associate professor of music at IU East. She has earned music degrees from the University of Michigan, the Royal Academy of Music (London), and the University of British Columbia (Vancouver). In addition to her over 20 years of private teaching, Raposo has taught at Fairfield University, King's College London, the Norwalk and Naugatuck Valley community colleges, and Jackson State Community College (TN). She also conducted the flute choirs of the Stamford Young Artists Philharmonic program.

Her orchestral experience includes the Vancouver Symphony, Burnaby Symphony (principal flute), Muncie Symphony, Michigan Pops Orchestra (principal flute), and the Rome Festival Orchestra. An avid chamber musician, Raposo was flutist with the Wolverine Winds quintet and Trio Euterpe, and is a member of the Tempest Flute Ensemble. She performed for Sir James Galway at the University of British Columbia's FluteFest in 2005, and won the 2007 National Flute Association's Piccolo Masterclass Competition. Her latest ensemble, The Melba Project, explores the soprano-flute collaborations of Nellie Melba. A firm advocate of music education, Raposo has worked as a band director in the Westport, CT Public Schools, and has led workshops and classes for middle and high school students. Raposo's research into the flute's English performance history, the basis of her M.M. and D.M.A. degrees, won her the National Flute Association's 2008 Graduate Research Competition. She has written for Pan, the magazine of the British Flute Society, and for The Flutist Quarterly.

Watanabe, flutist, is a native of Japan. She is a professor of flute at Ball State University and chair of the Certificate in Entrepreneurial Music program. Prior to this, Watanabe taught at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh, the Memorial University of Newfoundland, and the University of Windsor, Canada. A celebrated and versatile international performer, Watanabe has won competitions sponsored by both the Japan Flute Association and the National Flute Association (NFA), and has appeared in Japan, Israel, Canada, England, and USA as a recitalist, chamber musician, and concerto soloist. She is the member of the faculty woodwind quintet, the Musical Arts Quintet. She has held several principal flute positions and performed with American and Canadian orchestras. Currently, she is the principal flutist of the Muncie Symphony Orchestra and has performed with the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra and Fort Wayne Philharmonic.

In addition to being a gifted flutist, Watanabe is also devoted to the field of ethnomusicology. Her research on Kazuo Fukushima's Mei for solo flute resulted in a feature article in the Spring 2008 issue of the Flutist Quarterly (later translated for Dutch and German flute journals), and led to lecture recitals for the NFA, the British Flute Society, and the International Flute Festival in Germany. Watanabe received her doctoral degree from the University of Michigan, her master's degree and performer's certificate from the Eastman School of Music, and her bachelor's degree from the Musashino Academia Musicae in Tokyo, Japan.

Frazer, pianist, is recognized globally as a premiere collaborative pianist. Known for her wit and style on and off stage, she "exudes an energy and an excitement that is both irresistible and endearing". She has performed with a "who's who" of international artists, and has performed in Weill Recital Hall in Carnegie Hall, Avery Fisher Hall, and Merkin Hall. Frazer is a principal pianist for the National Flute Association, the International Society of Bassists, the MTNA Southern Division, the Florida Flute Association, and has performed at the Oberstdorf Music Festival in Germany, World Bass Festival in Poland, ISI Florence in Italy, Bradetich International Double Bass Competition, International Hornists Society, International Trumpet Guild, North American Saxophone Alliance, International Clarinet Association, International Tuba Euphonium conventions, and numerous state and regional festivals. Frazer holds two performance degrees, was a two-time Fischoff finalist, and was an adjudicator for the prestigious Dranoff International Two Piano Competition.

Trauma Center Earns Reverification From American College of Surgeons Committee

Posted September 20, 2021

Reid Health's dedication to providing optimal care for injured patients has been recognized by a special committee of the American College of Surgeons, resulting in a reverification of the health system's status as a Level III trauma center.

Established by the American College of Surgeons in 1987, the Consultation/Verification Program for Hospitals promotes the development of trauma centers in which participants provide not only the hospital resources necessary for trauma care, but also the entire spectrum of care to address the needs of injured patients, from the prehospital phase through the rehabilitation process.

Verified trauma centers must meet criteria that ensures capability and institutional performance, as outlined by the American College of Surgeons' Committee on Trauma.

"Reverification reaffirms our team's commitment to providing excellent care to injured patients through education, training, policy development, and the use of specialized equipment," said Ryan Williams, Director of EMS, Forensics, and Trauma Services for Reid Health. "We work hard to develop protocols, policies, and evidence-based care guidelines to make our program as robust as possible.

"Reverification reaffirms our team's commitment to providing excellent care to injured patients through education, training, policy development, and the use of specialized equipment. We work hard to develop protocols, policies, and evidence-based care guidelines to make our program as robust as possible." -- Ryan Williams, Director of EMS, Forensics, and Trauma Services

"A trauma program is a multidisciplinary approach to caring for injured patients, from operating room, lab, blood bank, radiology, the emergency department, inpatient nursing, acute rehab and rehab services, and everyone in-between."

The ACS Committee on Trauma's verification program does not designate trauma centers. Instead, the program provides confirmation a trauma center has demonstrated its commitment to providing the highest quality care for all injured patients.

Reid first earned verification as a Level III trauma center in 2017. The process consists of a rigorous two-day survey that includes an in-depth chart review of trauma cases, a hospital tour, staff interviews, a review of staff education, and a review of the organization's community involvement such as general education and injury prevention education.

The Indiana Department of Health lists 22 other verified trauma centers in the state with either a Level I, II, or III designation. Reid is one of only two such centers in East Central Indiana.

About the American College of Surgeons

ACS is a scientific and educational association of surgeons that was founded in 1913 to raise the standards of surgical education and practice and to improve the care of the surgical patient. The college has more than 72,000 members, and it is the largest association of surgeons in the world. Longstanding achievements have placed the ACS in the forefront of American surgery and have made it an important advocate for all surgical patients.

Sickest COVID-19 Patients at Reid Health Share Several Commonalities

Posted September 20, 2021

The current Delta-variant surge in COVID-19 cases looks different than earlier waves of the pandemic.

Previously, patients tended to be older people with underlying health conditions, in other words, the most vulnerable among us.

Today, the sickest patients at Reid Health Hospital usually are younger (between the ages of 35 and 65), are at least overweight and are often morbidly obese (100 or more pounds above their ideal body weight), are diabetic, and most importantly, are unvaccinated.

Today, the sickest patients at Reid Health Hospital usually are younger (between the ages of 35 and 65), are at least overweight and are often morbidly obese (100 or more pounds above their ideal body weight), are diabetic, and most importantly, are unvaccinated.

According to Thomas Huth, M.D., Vice President of Medical Affairs for Reid Health, about 95% of the recent patients suffering from severe COVID-19 illness have been overweight. More than 85% of them were unvaccinated.

Statistics from the Indiana Department of Health show the vaccines remain highly effective in limiting the severity of illness.

Less than 1% of those vaccinated in the state have had a breakthrough case. Only 0.02% of vaccinated Indiana residents have required hospitalization and just 0.006% of vaccinated Hoosiers have died. The average age of a breakthrough death is 80.

Those who are younger and healthier might not be as high risk as others for severe COVID-19, but they can be the route of transmission to those who are. Getting vaccinated reduces the likelihood of passing along the virus, protecting not only themselves but their loved ones as well.

Anyone who is moderately to severely immunocompromised -- such as those fighting cancer, recent organ transplant recipients, or those taking immunosuppressing drugs -- also is at high risk for severe COVID-19.

Those who fall into that category are now eligible to receive a third dose of either the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines.

Today's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 74
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 54 (73%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 14
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 13 (92.8%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 12
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 12 (100%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 399
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 70 (17.5% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 18

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Tales from the Departed: Earlham Cemetery Historical Walking Tour

Posted September 15, 2021

Tag Line: Wayne County History Comes Alive!

Supplied Graphic: Tales from the Departed

When: Saturday October 2, 2021 1:00 – 4:00 pm

Where: Earlham Cemetery 1101 National Rd W, Richmond, IN 47374 *Wayne County Historical Museum if adverse weather occurs

Admission: $10.00/ Car -Payments will be accepted at the east gate, Cash or Credit/Debit Card

Description: Tales from the Departed kicks off on Saturday, October 2 from 1:00 to 4:00. Richmond's history is endlessly interesting, and visitors to the cemetery on that day can meet some of the people who helped make that history. Mayors, soldiers, businessmen and more will be on hand to tell their stories and engage with participants. Come out and enjoy a walk around a beautiful cemetery and meet some interesting personalities from Richmond's past.

Background: Since 2007, the Wayne County Historical Museum has enchanted audiences of all ages with our historical walking tour of Earlham Cemetery. This year we will have several characters from Wayne County's historical past for visitors to meet!

This year's lineup includes:

  • John F. Miller – Creator of Glen Miller Park
  • Cornelius Ratliff -- prominent early Quaker
  • Mary Birdsall -- early Wayne County women's suffragist
  • Dr. Isaac Teague -- 19th century physician who peddled miracle cures
  • Mrs. Wm Wilson -- wife of Civil War veteran
  • Thomas Bennett -- Civil War colonel and frequent Richmond mayor
  • Dr. William Zimmerman – Frequent Richmond Mayor with a colorful past

Community Benefit Hands Out $130,000 in Year's Second Round of Grant Funding

Posted September 15, 2021

Reid Health Community Benefit gave some $130,000 to 19 area organizations in the health system's second round of grant funding for 2021.

Various nonprofits, churches, schools, and local governments received $130,297 for programs focused on physical activity, nutrition, and weight.

Requests were evaluated based on their ability to impact access to exercise opportunities, adults ages 20 and older who are obese, adults 20 and older who are sedentary, child food insecurity rate, and food insecurity rate.

The awards for this cycle include:

  • $5,145 to Amigos to support the organization's tennis camps.
  • $15,000 to Birth to Five for its Parents as Teachers program to provide physical activity and nutrition education and food items to families.
  • $11,250 to Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County for Club Fit's physical activity and nutrition programming.
  • $2,000 to Central United Methodist Church for equipment and supplies to provide physical activity for children ages 0-5.
  • $7,500 to Communities in School for a food distribution program for all CIS sites.
  • $3,000 to the Council on Rural Service Programs to support a running program for at-risk youth in Darke County, Ohio.
  • $10,000 to Gateway Hunger Relief Center for a portion of the cost of a new forklift for the pantry.
  • $2,750 to Girls, Inc. to install a GaGa dodgeball pit.
  • $3,000 to Golay Community Center to purchase new sets of dumbbells appropriate for all ages and abilities.
  • $10,000 to Gleaners for the organization's Produce Hope program to provide additional fruits and vegetables to four counties in Reid's service area.
  • $1,993 to Hayes Arboretum for equipment and signage to enhance the mountain bike trails and walking trails on the east side of the arboretum.
  • $5,000 to Hope Center to provide baby food, formula, cereal, and age-appropriate snacks for the Healthy with Hope program.
  • $5,000 to Randolph County YMCA to support the YMCA nine-week summer camp for kids in first through eighth grades.
  • $15,000 to Richmond Parks & Recreation Department for the purchase and installation of a climbing wall at the Cordell Municipal Pool.
  • $8,000 to Rose Hamilton Elementary School to support outdoor play activities for preschool-aged children at the school and in the surrounding neighborhood.
  • $1,000 to The Shepherd's Way (Cross Road Christian Recovery Center) for a fitness program for the Cross Road residents at the Richmond Family YMCA.
  • $1,875 to Triangle Therapy Association to purchase equipment for outdoor play for camps provided By Triangle Therapy Services.
  • $11,534 to Wayne County Cardinal Greenway to support the bike loaner program and for the purchase and installation of an additional bike repair station as well as upgraded signage.
  • $11,250 to YMCA of Greater Dayton (Preble County's YMCA) to support the Livestrong program and the new Revitalize at the Y program.

Community benefit is the basis of the tax-exempt status of not-for-profit hospitals. Community benefit is defined as programs or activities that improve access to health services, enhance public health, advance health knowledge through research and education, and/or relieve the burden of government to improve health.

In 2010, the Affordable Care Act added new requirements for tax-exempt hospitals in the areas of community health needs assessment (CHNA), implementation strategy, billing and collections, and reporting. In 2014, the IRS issued final rules implementing these requirements. The goals of these provisions are to ensure tax-exempt hospitals are meeting the health needs of their communities and to ensure greater transparency and accountability.

Grants, along with other specific outreach and requirements to meet Reid Health's not-for-profit status, have put more than $172 million back into the community in the past five years. A committee of Reid's governing board and community members reviews grant requests. The grants are awarded as part of the health system's efforts as a mission-driven, not-for-profit organization.

IU East chancellor in Preble County Competition to Raise Funds for the Arts

Posted September 15, 2021

Supplied Photo:  Kathy GirtenThe event may be tagged "Bad Art, Good Folk," but when it comes to participating artist and Indiana University East Chancellor Kathryn Girten, some might argue it's good art as well.

Girten's decision to be one of the artists in the upcoming annual fundraiser for the Preble County Art Association (PCAA) came easy - she's long had an interest in the arts, most recently in painting with pastels.

"I've always loved to draw. When I was in high school, I was one of those kids who hung out in the art room," she said. She even considered going to art school before attending Middlebury College in Vermont for a broader liberal arts education. Her master's and Ph. D. are in archaeology, though she never gave up her love for art.

She did scientific illustration for many years. While living in California, she had an opportunity to take a class in painting in pastels. "I fell in love with the medium." She's painted in the medium now for a decade. Girten's entry for the fundraiser is a painting of roses - she was inspired by the flowers at the Richmond Rose Garden. Her interest in art isn't limited to one area either. She is finishing up a term as president of the Richmond Symphony Orchestra Board. She plays the piano. She's been involved in the Richmond Art Museum, and also participates in art and music events on campus.

Her passion and training in the arts definitely contributed to her skills as a college administrator. "The arts help one think in new and different ways - to see things from different perspectives and angles. That's important in administrative work as well!" The arts also teach the importance of dedication and practice. "Like athletics, you've got to put in the hours if you want to improve. And there is always so much to learn."

"There is so much that impresses me about the art culture in this community. Richmond has a rich history in the visual arts, including the well-known 'Richmond Group' of artists who were active in the late 19th century and mid-20th century. And of course, that rich legacy continues today," she said.

PCAA Executive Director Claudia Edwards, B.S. 2014, noted the "Bad Art, Good Folk" Reception and Art Auction is being held on Saturday, October 2, at 6:30 p.m. in the Gymnasium at Eagle's Point in Eaton, Ohio. But votes are being taken online until the event at Preble County Art Association - Bad Art, Good Folk. Votes are $1 each and can be submitted up until the event.

The event consists of nine artists split into three teams. The teams of three artists are paired with a mentor. The event is the organization's main fundraiser, generating more than $250,000 in the last six years.

As an IU East grad, Edwards is honored to have her chancellor among the participants. "She's a very experienced artist, a community-centered individual and an advocate for the arts and education. Chancellor Girten is such a generous person who truly cares about communities, their growth and development."

Edwards encourages the IU East team and other graduates to consider supporting the event with votes for Girten. "I'm really rooting for my alma mater to win," she said, noting that the more the competition heats up between artists and teams, the better it will be for the PCAA.

Besides online, donations can be made directly to the association, Edwards said. If donating by check, Girten can receive credit by putting her name in the memo area.

On auction night, all art pieces will be auctioned to the highest bidder, with vote funds credited to the totals. An award will be given to one individual artist and one of the three teams. "We have had artwork sold for anywhere from $1,500 to $12,000 in the past. It's a fun and exciting event," Edwards said.

The funds will help the Preble County Art Association make affordable art programming available to the community and allow partnering with other organizations to make art accessible to everyone.

For more information on the Preble County Art Association or Bad Art, Good Folk, visit preblearts.org/.

Reid Health Passes 45,000 COVID-19 Vaccine Doses Milestone

Posted September 15, 2021

Reid Health recently administered its 45,000th dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, a milestone that was a long time in coming.

It took only a month after vaccinations began in mid-December for the health system to give out its first 5,000 doses. By mid-May, Reid had reached 40,000.

But the pace of vaccination already had significantly slowed at that time, and it would take another four months to finally get to 45,000 doses administered.

The COVID-19 vaccine remains the best tool available to end the pandemic, and Reid continues to offer several vaccination sites, including a new one on the main campus in Richmond.

Vaccinations now are available 6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday on the main concourse next to the Home Medical Equipment store. Patients already present for outpatient services are offered the opportunity to receive a vaccine during their visit.

Walk-ins are welcome, but appointments also can be made through Indiana's COVID-19 vaccination website, ourshot.in.gov.

Some 43 people were vaccinated at the new site on its first day Monday.

Those who get their shot at the new location will receive a card good for a free drink and snack at the Espresso Bar or at the Café at 1200.

Both the one-dose Johnson & Johnson and the two-dose Pfizer vaccines are available at the new site. Other Reid vaccination sites use only the Pfizer product.

During its first day Monday, some 43 people were vaccinated at the new site at Reid Health's main campus in Richmond.

Those who opt for the Pfizer version will be scheduled for their second dose at either Reid's vaccination clinic at the Kuhlman Center on the Wayne County Fairgrounds or Reid's Residency Clinic on Sim Hodgin Parkway.

Anyone 12 years and older can receive the Pfizer vaccine while those wanting Johnson & Johnson must be at least 18. Parents or legal guardians of minor children who will be vaccinated need to be present at the time of vaccination.

All those receiving the vaccine are required to remain for a 15-minute observation period.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

As a reminder, a door screening is required to enter the main campus, and a surgical mask will be provided for entry. Cloth masks are no longer acceptable at Reid facilities.

Today's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 72
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 57 (79.2%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 13
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 13 (100%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 9
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 9 (100%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 375
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 38 (10.1% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 23

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

COVID-19 Vaccines Now Available on Reid Health's Main Campus

Posted September 13, 2021

Reid Health has added another convenient location where community members can receive the COVID-19 vaccine.

Beginning today, vaccinations are available 6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday on the main concourse next to the Home Medical Equipment store at the health system's main campus in Richmond.

Patients already present for outpatient services will be offered the opportunity to receive a vaccine during their visit.

Walk-ins are welcome, but appointments also can be made through Indiana's COVID-19 vaccination website, ourshot.in.gov.

As a reminder, a door screening is required, and a surgical mask will be provided for entry. Cloth masks are no longer acceptable at Reid facilities.

Those who get their vaccination at the new location will receive a card good for a free drink and snack at the Espresso Bar or at the Café at 1200.

Both the one-dose Johnson & Johnson and the two-dose Pfizer vaccines are available at this site. Other Reid vaccination sites use the Pfizer product.

Vaccinations are now available 6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday on the main concourse next to the Home Medical Equipment store at Reid Health's main campus in Richmond.

Anyone 12 years and older can receive the Pfizer vaccine while those wanting Johnson & Johnson must be at least 18. Parents or legal guardians of minor children who will be vaccinated need to be present at the time of vaccination.

All persons receiving the vaccine are required to remain for a 15-minute observation period.

Those who opt for the Pfizer version will be scheduled for their second dose at either Reid's vaccination clinic at the Kuhlman Center on the Wayne County Fairgrounds or Reid's Residency Clinic on Sim Hodgin Parkway.

In addition to Reid's public vaccination sites, county health departments and pharmacies throughout Reid's service area are offering COVID-19 vaccinations. To see the list of options and schedule an appointment, Indiana residents should go to ourshot.in.gov while Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.

COVID hotline available 7 days a week

Reid's COVID-19 hotline can help with scheduling COVID testing as well as getting test results or clinical advice. That number -- (765) 965-4200 -- is available from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. seven days a week.

Today's COVID-19 Stats

  • Confirmed COVID-positive patients in containment areas: 80
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 63 (78.8%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 13
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 12 (92.3%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 10
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 10 (100%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 931
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 175 (18.8% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 26

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key Reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

COVID-19 Surge Keeping Hospital at 'Critical' Bed Status

Posted September 10, 2021

For weeks now, a surge in COVID-19 cases has kept Reid Health Hospital on "critical" bed status, even as overflow areas have been set up to create room for more patients.

The health system finds itself in a similar situation as it did in the late fall/early winter of last year during a previous wave of the pandemic. Making matters worse this time around is the severity of patients' illness.

The average length of stay now is longer because patients are sicker. The hospital often is admitting more people per day than are being discharged, creating the need for overflow areas that also have been filling up.

Hospital staffing resources have been stretched thin as a result of the Delta variant-fueled surge. To help, RNs who may have transitioned to other roles in the organization have been asked to return to clinical roles. However, some positions -- such as those in the Critical Care Unit -- require highly specialized skillsets that not every clinical staff member has.

Today's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 72
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 60 (83.3%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 12
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 10 (83.3%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 11
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 9 (81.8%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 421
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 82 (19.5% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 19

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Life on the front line

Hear from Erin Suttman, Hospitalist NP, about the bed shortage at Reid Health Hospital and its effect on patients and staff.

Key Reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

New Wave of COVID-19 Leads to Reinstatement of Hospital's Surge Plan

Posted September 9, 2021

It was just two months ago that the number of COVID-19 patients at Reid Health Hospital reached zero for the first time since the pandemic began. As recently as mid-July, the weekly average remained as low as two.

Today, the situation looks very different. Hospitalizations from COVID-19 have climbed quickly, leading to updated visitor restrictions and a reinstatement of Reid Health's surge plan as the hospital once again often finds itself on critical bed status.

As the number of COVID patients admitted to the hospital rises, more inpatient containment spaces are needed to care for them. That means moving some non-COVID patients with lower acuity or who are nearing discharge to temporary areas.

To facilitate such a move, outpatient IV and infusion therapy have relocated to Lingle Hall at the hospital, just as those services did last fall during another wave. The surge area created by the switch had 19 patients Thursday morning. Another overflow area on the hospital's sixth floor housed eight patients.

Just three beds were available in the Critical Care Unit.

Safety protocols that were implemented at the pandemic's beginning in Spring 2020 remain in place. Visitor restrictions that took effect recently include a limit of one visitor or companion in most situations and the need to wear a surgical mask instead of a cloth face covering, a new OSHA standard.

The changes are meant to ensure the safety of patients and their families whether they be at the hospital, their physician's office, having lab work done, or using any other Reid services.

Today's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 69
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 59 (85.5%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 13
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 11 (84.6%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 11
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 9 (81.8%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 300
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 17 (5.7% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 20

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Life on the front line

Reid emergency medicine physician Emily Kraft, M.D., shares her experience of treating the influx of COVID-19 patients in our community.

Key Reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Senior Adult Ministry September Meeting

Posted September 13, 2021

Have you met Arlo and Griffey, a special breed of therapy dogs who volunteer at nursing homes, hospitals, and school reading programs? They are brothers whose breed is Leonberger and whose weight can average 155 lbs. They also go to schools to teach children about pet care and safety and work with them in reading programs.

They will be the featured guests at the next meeting of the Senior Adult Ministry, which will be held at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, September 28, at First United Methodist Church, 318 National Road West, Richmond, IN. Also joining the therapy dogs are their partners, Steve and Julia Roberts.

Come, bring snacks to share and invite a friend for an hour of entertainment and Christian fellowship.

Senior Adult Ministry is an active group of seniors over 50 years old open to all regardless of religious affiliation. The group is guided by Pastor Judi Marshall, Clara Bulmer and Beverly Kirby. These three women actively share their gifts of ministry, hospitality and creativity in planning and organizing the monthly meetings.

For further information, call 765-962-4357.

Flag Flies on Main Reid Health Campus in Remembrance of 9/11

Posted September 13, 2021

Supplied Photo: Flag above Reid HealthAs vehicles drove through Reid Health's Emergency Department entrance late Wednesday afternoon, the sight there caused many to pause.

Hanging from a pair of large lifts on either side of the drive was a giant American flag. A crew from Beard Masonry Inc. worked to attach the flag and a banner below it. The message:

"Never Forget September 11, 2001"

The flag was donated to Reid by Beard Masonry Inc. President Mike Beard a few years ago from a different project.

"We've been keeping it around for a special occasion," said Jeff Cook, Director of Engineering and Environmental Services at Reid. "The 20-year anniversary of 9/11, it can't be more special than that."

Reid Health's website also will feature a remembrance video created by Global Media Enterprise.

The anniversary holds special significance for Reid Health President/CEO Craig Kinyon, who grew up near New York City. In the late 1970s, Kinyon worked as a part-timer on a small construction project on the 78th floor of the World Trade Center.

"It's still raw in our emotions. When you see it, it takes you right back to how you felt that day. That remembrance is importance. It makes you appreciate the massive loss of life and the humanitarian effort to save those who were injured. There were a lot of heroics to celebrate." -- Craig Kinyon, Reid Health President/CEO

"I could put myself right back in that room at that time," he said. "It's hard to believe 20 years have gone by since the attack. I remember huddling at the hospital when it happened. It was just so unbelievable.

"I have a lot of friends nearby there who thankfully were safe."

Although two decades have passed, the memories of that fateful morning haven't faded.

"It's still raw in our emotions. When you see it, it takes you right back to how you felt that day," Kinyon said.

"That remembrance is importance. It makes you appreciate the massive loss of life and the humanitarian effort to save those who were injured. There were a lot of heroics to celebrate."

The flag will remain on display through Tuesday, Sept. 14.

Residents of All Counties Can Resume Feeding Birds

Posted September 13, 2021

Hoosiers in all Indiana counties can now resume feeding birds, DNR announced today.

DNR had recommended a statewide moratorium on bird feeding earlier this summer to slow the spread of a still-undetermined illness that is killing birds across the state. Biologists identified more than 750 possible cases in 76 counties that involved a specific set of clinical signs, including crusty eyes, eye discharge, and neurological issues.

The actions of many Hoosiers significantly helped the DNR's work related to the disease outbreak. By taking down their feeders and submitting more than 4,300 reports, residents enabled DNR staff track the disease, detect regional differences, and provide updated recommendations for feeding birds. The DNR appreciates the efforts and actions of Hoosiers statewide.

Residents throughout Indiana may again put out their feeders if they are comfortable doing so and are not observing sick or dead birds in their yards. DNR strongly encourages residents who do so to clean seed and suet feeders at least once every two weeks by scrubbing feeders with soap and water, followed by a short soak in a 10% bleach solution. Cleaning feeders helps keep birds healthy and helps prevent the spread of disease. Feeders should be thoroughly rinsed and dried before being filled with birdseed. Hummingbird feeders should be cleaned at least once a week with a 10% bleach solution and rinsed thoroughly.

DNR biologists also encourage Hoosiers to continue reporting any sick or dead birds they find to on.IN.gov/sickwildlife. Reports help DNR staff continue to track this outbreak and identify new disease events and reoccurrences.

The USGS National Wildlife Health Center's avian disease experts and other scientists are continuing their investigative work on the unidentified bird disease. Indiana DNR has provided samples to the laboratory to aid with its testing.

For more information and to sign up to receive updates, visit on.IN.gov/songbirddeaths.

Fountain City Awarded Grant

Posted September 13, 2021

The Town of Fountain City has announced it was awarded $600,000 for improvements to the town's stormwater system. The improvements will benefit all residents of the town. The project will consist of installing more than 8,000 linear feet of stormwater mains, and the addition of 80 new inlets and manholes to prevent flooding.

Merger Creates Clarity, Synergy for Alumni Efforts

Posted August 11, 2021

Terry Wiesehan likes to say that the sun never sets on Indiana University alumni chapters.

That's because they range around the world, says IU East's director of Alumni Relations and Campus Ceremonies.

Until recently, the East Region had two chapters -- one serving IU East and the other serving graduates from all nine campuses that make up the IU system.

Now, the chapter of that double-duty history lesson has closed and another one has opened. Put the emphasis on one -- as in the IU Alumni Association East Region.

The marriage of the IU East Alumni Association and the East Central Indiana Chapter IU Alumni Association is welcomed because it creates more clarity, more clout and more synergy, say board members who carried over in leadership roles.

"It made sense to combine those. It was confusing. There was a lot of duplication," says Richmond optometrist Jerry Logan, who has served on a variety of IU boards for five decades.

He is secretary of the new board and Bill Kehlenbrink is the newly installed president.

"It gives us more prominence in the state," Kehlenbrink believes. "Being part of a larger (chapter), gives us more clarity and outreach."

The longtime issue of duality stems from the fact that Indiana University is made up of the main campus at Bloomington and eight regional campuses. They are separate, but equal.

"We are all one IU. We are all family," Wiesehan said. "The diploma is the same regardless of what campus you come from."

Kehlenbrink graduated from IU East in 2001 with a Bachelor of Science in General Studies. He also attended IU Bloomington.

Logan earned his Bachelor of Science in Optometry in 1967 and his Doctorate of Optometry in 1969, in Bloomington.

The overall object of the new alumni chapter is to advocate for IU East and Indiana University.

Before the merger, one chapter served just IU East alumni and one served any alumni around the region who graduated with an IU degree.

Now, the single chapter serves alumni who attended any of the campuses and are residents of Fayette, Henry, Randolph, Union and Wayne County counties. It also serves graduates from western Ohio.

"Not every regional campus has joined with the alumni chapter in their area but we feel for us and our alumni it has been a win-win decision," Logan said.

The merger officially took place in 2020, but there were considerable growing pains. The first combined board meeting was scheduled to take place the first week of March. "You know what happened then," Wiesehan said.

The effects of COVID-19 changed everything on a campus known for its togetherness, its family feeling. Just as students and staff were forced to do, the new board met for almost a year and a half on Zoom.

"COVID really separated us, isolated us," says Kehlenbrink, who is a clinical system analyst at Reid Health, where he has been employed for 35 years.

This July's meeting of the new board was the first conducted in person.

The campus is opening up and returning to more normal operations, as are efforts to physically connect with alumni.

"We tried to be real creative, but it still wasn't the same," Wiesehan said. "It's hard to engage alumni on Zoom."

In fact, the IU East experience is about community, about connectedness, about keeping costs more affordable. Students, teachers and staff are known for being especially close.

"IU East is a family," Wiesehan said.

Graduates cite those attributes time after time for their successes.

Kehlenbrink certainly does.

"It is a very personal campus. Several professors became good friends with me; mentors launched me toward areas of interest. It formed who I am today as an adult," Kehlenbrink said.

He is also thrilled that he finished at IU East because of flexibility and lower costs, something that remains a strong feature for students and prospective students. "I could work full time and go part time," he said. "I could pay as I went. I had no doubt it was a great place for me."

While attending IU East, he served as president of the activities board and started the first intramural basketball program. "I've always had an investment in this university," he said. "I am excited to do all I can to support it and this town."

He is excited to see what positive effects will come from the merger.

The alumni association sponsors a host of activities. Many are related to community service projects and others are designed to connect with alumni and reach prospective students.

Wiesehan serves as board treasurer and always has her eyes on recruiting new alumni leaders who can advocate for IU.

"I ask people if they know someone, vet them and ask them," Wiesehan said. "The first object is representing IU well and being willing to work. I don't know a single alum who doesn't want to do something."

The East Region Chapter is steered by the mission to serve IU, its alumni, friends and communities by providing opportunities to meaningfully connect with their alma mater to help elevate Indiana University, Indiana University East and the East Region.

In addition to the four campaigns set by the corporate IU Alumni Association: promoting the IU Trustee's Election, welcoming new members, participating in the annual IU Day Celebration, and providing scholarship to IU students, the East Region facilitates various local programs such as:

  • Adulting 101: For young professionals, presented by alumni
  • IU Cares: Community Service Projects
  • Destination IU - Welcoming incoming freshman to the IU System
  • Scholarship Dinner-Celebrating the recipients of the Alumni Scholarships
  • Run with the Wolves 5K - funding the Alumni Scholarship Endowment
  • Lifetime Member Event- Promoting camaraderie
  • IU Day with local Kiwanis - presenting an IU Speaker
  • Read Across America - Celebrating Dr. Seuss's birthday in local Elementary Schools

Sarah Soper rotated off the board after serving as the last president of the East Central Indiana chapter and first president of the new regional chapter. She was thrilled to see the merger. "Our two boards have a robust history of working together to provide quality IU events on the local stage," she said in a press release. "This formal unification will allow us to more holistically meet the needs of and serve all alumni in the region."

Soper received a Bachelor of Arts from IU Bloomington in 2002 and her Master of Science at IU East in 2013.

The board fluctuates from about 12 to 15 members that offer a mix of educational and community backgrounds.

The board's vice president, Lorin Williams, is a Reid Health marketing specialist who earned his Bachelor of Arts in Journalism in 2010 at IU Bloomington.

Other current board members show a diversity of ages and employment backgrounds:

  • Corey Baker received a Bachelor of Science in Education from the Bloomington campus in 2012. He is an agent for Farm Bureau Insurance.
  • Elise Beatty, O.D., earned her optometry degrees in 1999 and 2002. She works at Eye Center of Richmond.
  • Tiani Christian, Bachelor of Arts in Communication Studies at IU East 2021. She is the co-owner, associate broker for Richmond Community Real Estate.
  • Travis Cornett, Bachelor of Science in Business Administration 2007 at IU East, is a compliance officer at Citizen State Bank.
  • Alfredo Diamond, Bachelor of Science in General Studies 2005 at IU East, is a realtor in Richmond.
  • Erin Harris, Bachelor of Science in Nursing 2005 and Master of Science in Nursing in 2020 at IU East, is a nurse practitioner at Reid Health Urgent Care.
  • Jim Low, Bachelor of Science in Business Logistics 1982 at IU Bloomington, works in dispatch and customer service for Ernst Concrete.
  • Ethan Snapp, Bachelor of Science Business Administration 2019 at IU East, works for 3 Rivers Federal Credit Union.

Adults Age 55+ Invited to Participate in the JOY Games in Richmond

Posted August 11, 2021

LifeStream Services is partnering with Reid Health Alliance Medicare, The Leland Legacy, and the Richmond Senior Recreation Center to host the JOY (Just Older Youth) Games in Richmond. The event, previously known as t4he Area 9 Senior Games, features three days of activities for adults over the age of 55 to enjoy.

JOY Games will be held on September 20, 21, and 22 at various locations throughout Richmond including Clear Creek Park, Highland Lake Golf Course, 40 Bowl, and the Richmond Senior Recreation Center. Activities include a pickle ball tournament, 3 on 3 basketball, bowling, golf scramble, euchre, ping-pong, bingo, and much more. Additionally, Day 1 of the JOY Games will offer food trucks at Clear Creek Park. Food trucks will be open to the public to enjoy and JOY Games participants will receive a voucher to redeem for breakfast or lunch.

The cost to participate is just $10 and includes unlimited activities, complimentary lunch, awards, and a t-shirt. T-shirts are limited so register early. There is an additional $25 fee for those who plan to participate in the golf scramble. Those interested in participating or businesses who wish to sponsor this event can sign up online at lifestreaminc.org/games. For more information on registration and sponsorship, please contact Micole Leverette, Community Services Assistant, at 765-620-9907 or mleverette@lifestreaminc.org.

IU East's Run with the Wolves 5K Returns September 25

Posted August 24, 2021

IU East's Run with the Wolves 5K is Saturday, September 25.
IU East's Run with the Wolves 5K is Saturday, September 25.

The Indiana University East Run with the Wolves 5K returns to campus this year, though a little later than usual because of the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic.

Terry Wiesehan, director of Alumni Relations at IU East, expects the popular event scheduled for Saturday, September 25, will again draw hundreds of participants. "We are excited to be back," she said, noting the run will be the largest public event on campus since the pandemic began in early 2020.

First responders and front-line healthcare workers can sign up for free as a thank-you for their hard work and assistance throughout the past year. "This is our way of thanking them for their service during the pandemic."

The event takes place on campus and the Red Wolves' cross country course, located behind Hayes Hall. The Run with the Wolves 5K includes a "Run with Rufus" 1K family run/walk. All pre-registrants receive a Run with the Wolves race shirt.

"This year's shirt is awesome, and everyone will want to register to guarantee one," Wiesehan said.

Day-of-race registration opens at 7 a.m. on September 25 at the Hayes Hall patio, located on the lower level of the building. The 5K run/walk starts at 8 a.m. followed by the "Run with Rufus" 1K at 9:05 a.m. Awards will be presented at 9:25 a.m. at the Hayes Hall patio.

Run with the Wolves is part of the Wayne County Challenge series.

Brian Schleeper, race director with Wayne County Challenge, said the first two races to return in 2021 after an entirely virtual season last year has gone over well.

"The first two races have seen good turnouts, so the runners and walkers are happy to be back to live races," Schleeper said.

Register online at iue.edu/5k. The pre-registration cost is $20, and day-of registration is $25. Students in grades K-12 and college can pre-register for $15 or register on race day for $20. Pre-register by September 17 to ensure a shirt.

Proceeds from the event will support student scholarship programs funded through the IU Alumni Association East Region.

For more information, contact Terry Wiesehan, director of Alumni Relations, at (765) 973-8221 or email twiesaha@iue.edu.

Deer Hunters Urged to Remember Safety Tips

Posted September 20, 2021

With the deer reduction zone season underway, youth deer season Sept. 25-26, and the statewide archery deer season starting Oct. 1, Indiana Conservation Officers remind hunters to stay safe.

The various deer hunting seasons run through Jan. 31, 2022. It is estimated that more than 300,000 people will participate in some form of deer hunting in Indiana during that span.

The most common injuries during deer seasons are accidents involving tree stands and elevated platforms. Hunters should follow the safety tips listed below when hunting from an elevated position:

Before the hunt:

  • Read and understand the tree stand manufacturer's instructions.
  • Check tree stands and equipment for wear, fatigue, and cracks or loose nuts/bolts, paying particularly close attention to parts made of material other than metal.
  • Practice at ground level.
  • Learn how to properly wear your full-body safety harness.

During the hunt:

  • Wear your full-body safety harness.
  • Use a tree stand safety rope.
  • Make certain to attach your harness to the tree before leaving the ground, and that it remains attached to the tree until you return to the ground.
  • Maintain three points of contact during ascent and descent.
  • Use boots with non-slip soles to avoid slipping.
  • Use a haul line to raise and lower firearms, bows and other hunting gear.
  • Make certain firearms are unloaded, action open, and safety on before attaching the haul line.

Additional safety tips:

  • Carry emergency equipment, such as a cell phone and flashlight.
  • Make a plan before you hunt.
  • Tell someone your plan, including where you will be hunting and when you plan to return.
  • Stick to your plan.
  • Identify game before pointing a firearm.
  • Know your target and what is beyond it.

For more information, see hunting.IN.gov.

About Ivermectin: 'Little Scientific Evidence' of Benefit in Treating COVID-19

Posted September 20, 2021

Throughout the pandemic, health and science experts have searched for safe, effective ways to prevent and treat COVID-19. Simultaneously, social media platforms have been used to spread misinformation about the supposed efficacy of several drugs.

The first of these to go from online chatter to receiving national attention was hydroxychloroquine, but studies have shown it to be unhelpful in the treatment of COVID-19 and potentially even harmful. Today, ivermectin is the drug of choice in some social media circles.

Ivermectin is used in humans to treat infections caused by some parasitic worms and head lice as well as skin conditions such as rosacea. There are also versions of ivermectin meant for animals that come in injectable, paste, and pour-on forms.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration says taking large doses of ivermectin is dangerous. There have been multiple reports of patients who have required medical attention, including hospitalization, after taking ivermectin meant for livestock.

"Ivermectin is not approved by the FDA for the prevention or treatment of COVID-19 because the best quality studies so far provide little scientific evidence of benefit," said Thomas Huth, M.D., Vice President of Medical Affairs for Reid Health.

"Over the course of the pandemic, doctors and scientists across the globe have worked tirelessly to identify effective ways to prevent and treat COVID-19, and great strides have been made, resulting in the vaccines, antiviral medications, synthetic antibodies, and advanced ventilation techniques, among other things, that are making a big difference in outcomes today.

"Ivermectin is not approved by the FDA for the prevention or treatment of COVID-19 because the best quality studies so far provide little scientific evidence of benefit." -- Thomas Huth, M.D., Vice President of Medical Affairs

"Many other potential therapies have been and continue to be examined closely for possible benefit, and that includes ivermectin. Unfortunately, to date, the evidence in favor of ivermectin is very weak and its safety in COVID-19 is not proven.

"And because we want the very best for our patients, we can't recommend it in good conscience."

The best way to prevent contracting and spreading COVID-19 remains getting vaccinated. To schedule a vaccination appointment, Indiana residents should use ourshot.in.gov and Ohio residents can use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.

Today's COVID-19 stats

  • Patients in containment areas: 73
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 57 (78%)
  • COVID-19 patients in the ICU: 16
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 14 (87.5%)
  • COVID-19 patients on ventilators: 12
  • Number of those patients who are unvaccinated: 12 (100%)
  • Tests submitted since last update: 350
  • Lab-confirmed positives since last update: 54 (15.4% positivity rate)
  • Suspected COVID-19 admissions in the past 24 hours: 28

Reid Health serves an eight-county area, including Wayne, Randolph, Henry, Union, Fayette, and Franklin counties in Indiana and Darke and Preble counties in Ohio. The statistics above represent patients from throughout the service area.

Key reminders

  • You should never delay care. Previous surges have seen patients put off necessary care for emergent issues such as chest pain, stroke symptoms, appendicitis, and even symptoms of cancer. Delaying care can have life-altering consequences.
  • COVID-19 vaccines are free. They are safe. Make an informed decision by consulting sites such as the CDC and FDA. Indiana residents can find vaccination sites and schedule an appointment by going to ourshot.in.gov. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.
  • If you have questions, Reid's COVID-19 hotline is available seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call (765) 965-4200 to schedule a test, receive test results, and seek clinical advice, including about monoclonal antibody infusions.
  • Before you come to a Reid Health site to see a loved one or accompany them to an appointment, be sure to check out our latest visitor policy and screening procedures.
  • Surgical masks are required in all Reid Health facilities. Cloth masks are not acceptable. Reid will provide you with a surgical mask upon entry if needed.

Safe Pathways to Care: Learn more about COVID-19 and vaccinations

Get Outside With Friends and Family on Sept. 25

Posted September 23, 2021

Free Fishing Day and National Hunting & Fishing Day on Sept. 25 are opportunities for Hoosiers to get a hands-on experience with nature and enjoy the state's public lands and waters.

On Free Fishing Days, which happen periodically throughout the year, Indiana residents can fish any of the state's public waters without a fishing license or a trout/salmon stamp. To celebrate the last Free Fishing Day of 2021, several Indiana DNR properties, including some state parks and state recreation areas, will offer events and activities to encourage and help visitors and families try fishing. These include opportunities to borrow fishing equipment as well as attend workshops at selected DNR locations. More information on Free Fishing Day and related events is at on.IN.gov/FishFree.

National Hunting & Fishing Day recognizes the power of individuals as a positive force in the protection of natural resources. The day also serves to acknowledge the ways hunters and anglers provide the funding foundation for wildlife conservation. The DNR invites all Hoosiers to visit Fish & Wildlife areas (FWAs), state parks, state forests, and other public land throughout Indiana. Check calendar.dnr.IN.gov for more information on events at FWAs, such as building blinds at Kankakee FWA in preparation for waterfowl hunting season.

Several hunting seasons are also open the weekend of Sept. 25 and 26, including dove, sora rail, snipe, early teal, squirrel, and youth deer season. A great way of celebrating National Hunting & Fishing Day is by sharing with others the experience of hunting for a delicious, locally harvested meal.

As fall begins, invite your friends and family to join you outdoors. Take time to safely do what you love with those you love spending time with while enjoying Indiana's public lands.

To view all DNR news releases, please see dnr.IN.gov.

Ivy Tech Community College Richmond Offering Vaccine Clinic

Posted September 1, 2021

Ivy Tech Community College's Richmond campus will offer a free, walk-in COVID-19 vaccination clinic with the Pfizer and Johnson & Johnson options. No appointment is needed, but a state issued ID will be required. It is important to note, those under 18 will need to have parent consent, which can be completed while on-site.

WHAT: Ivy Tech Richmond Campus COVID-19 Vaccination Clinic

WHERE: Ivy Tech Richmond Campus
Johnson Hall Parking Lot
2357 Chester Blvd., Richmond, IN 47374

WHEN: Wednesday, September 8 from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

LifeStream's Healthy Aging Expo Returns to Offer Drive-Thru Resources

Posted September 13, 2021

The community is invited to attend the drive-thru Healthy Aging Expo on Thursday, September 16. The expo is free to attend and the first 200 attendees will receive a complimentary lunch. Vendors will be set up tailgate style to share resources and all attendees will receive a resource bag with information on local activities and information for older adults.

The community can drive-thru the Healthy Aging Expo between 11:00am to 1:00pm at the Kuhlman Center located at 861 N. Salisbury Rd. Richmond, IN 47374. Attendees will enter at the NW L St. entrance. The Healthy Aging Expo is presented by Reid Health Alliance Medicare, The Leland Legacy, Kicks96, 101.7 The Point, and The Legend 95.3.

LifeStream is currently seeking volunteers to assist at the event. If you are interested in volunteering please contact Laura Bray, Volunteer Services Administrator, at 765-759-3372 or lbray@lifestreaminc.org. Learn more about the Healthy Aging Expo at lifestreaminc.org/healthy-aging-expo.

Special thanks to this year's sponsors and tailgate supporters including Reid Health, Arbor Trace, Forest Park Health Campus/The Springs of Richmond, George's Pharmacy & Medical Equipment, Graceworks Housing Services, Meridian Health Services, Morrisson-Reeves Library, Phillips Drugs, Premier Hospice, Qsource, Remedy Home Healthcare, Richmond Symphony Orchestra, State Health Insurance Assistance Program, Stateline Medical Equipment, Well Care Community Health, and Whitewater Commons Senior Living.

Neighborhood Health Center Locations to Add Stations for Overdose Intervention

Posted August 24, 2021

Neighborhood Health Center (NHC) locations in Richmond and Liberty are being equipped with "NaloxBox" stations as part of a state program to expand access to the life-saving opioid reversal agent.

"Indiana ranks 14th nationally for opioid overdose deaths. COVID-19 has dramatically affected the opioid epidemic. As of November 2020, Indiana has seen a 33% increase in opioid overdose deaths and naloxone administration by emergency medical services is up 63%. The availability of naloxone – or Narcan – has saved countless lives when an addiction leads to an overdose," said Carrie Miles, Chief Executive Officer for NHC. "There have been 29 confirmed overdose deaths in Wayne County in 2021 with several more pending. We strive to do everything we can to improve – or even save – the lives of patients in the communities we serve, so this service is an important addition."

Dr. Carrie Mier, board president of Drug Free Wayne County Partnership and associate professor of criminal just at IU East, applauded the center's willingness to participate in the program, which was announced in May 2020 by Indiana Gov. Eric J. Holcomb and the Indiana Family and Social Services Administration's Division of Mental Health and Addiction. "Our mission at Drug Free Wayne County Partnership is to work together today for a healthier, safer, drug-free community tomorrow," she said. "The NaloxBox program allows us to do that."

Mier said her organization is seeking other participants in the program. "We would like to continue to expand this program outside of the Richmond area in Wayne County as well," she said, noting that organizations interested can contact her organization at drugfreewaynecountypaernership@gmail.com

The state is partnering with Overdose Lifeline, Inc. to expand access to the opioid reversal agent naloxone through the purchase of 24/7-access "NaloxBox" units.

"Making overdose response tools like naloxone readily available to any Hoosier who may encounter an individual suffering from an overdose is critical in addressing the drug epidemic," Gov. Holcomb said at the time of the announcement. "We're committed to raising awareness about the need for bystanders to carry this lifesaving drug, which is why we've made it available via so many avenues, oftentimes at no cost to Hoosiers."

Naloxone, or Narcan, is a medication approved to reverse overdose by opioids. Naloxone is given when a person is showing signs of opioid overdose. It blocks the toxic effects of the overdose and is often the difference between a patient living and dying.

A NaloxBox is a hard acrylic box mounted to an exterior wall that provides 24/7 access to naloxone and is an effective measure of addressing the increase of opioid overdoses in Indiana. Each unit contains six to eight doses of naloxone, instructions for use, and treatment referral cards. Any community member has access to this free resource. For more information and a map of available boxes, visit NaloxBox.org

Dedication Ceremony Held for Well-Known Caboose

Posted August 30, 2021

Supplied Photo: CB&O CabooseWhen Reid Health purchased the former Highland Heights Elementary School five years ago, the sale included a unique item on the property -- a more than 100-year-old caboose that once served as a popular site for birthday parties.

Reid officials knew of the railcar's history and wanted to ensure it would be preserved, so they found a group that would gladly take on the job of restoring the caboose and finding a new home for it.

"This was a piece of history that deserved to be in the hands of those who could properly care for it," said Craig Kinyon, Reid Health President/CEO. "The Wayne County Railroaders Association was the perfect organization to serve as the new owner."

Supplied Photos: Courtesy of DAJO  PhotosOn Saturday, the club held a dedication ceremony for the caboose, which now sits on a strip of land in Centerville's Maplewood Park. The event during the town's annual Archway Days celebration was the culmination of years of work to find a proper home for the railcar.

"When we first started talking about what to do with the caboose, we had no idea how old it was," said Len Vonderhaar, President of the Wayne County Railroaders Association. "We were able to track it back to 1907.

"We said this is something we should really take a look at. This is something that's going to be worthwhile. We should try to do whatever we can to save it."

The Wayne County Railroaders Assocation (WCRA) would like to express their gratitude and sincerest appreciation to Reid Health for the gift of this vintage 1907 CB&Q Way Car caboose.

After restorative work by the WCRA and with additional support and encouragement from Reid Health, the WCRA entered into an agreement with the city of Centerville to put the caboose on display as an act of community development and the preservation of history.

-- Dedication plaque inscription

The caboose was brought to Richmond from the Chicago area in 1974 by Dana Weigle, then-owner of the McDonald's on East Main Street. Weigle used it for birthday parties until donating it to Highland Heights Elementary in 1989 to make room for an expansion of the restaurant.

Jeff Millsaps (left) and Kenneth Bertsch of the Wayne County Railroaders Association mount the dedication plaque to its stand.

After the school closed in 2012, the caboose sat unused until Reid bought the property four years later. Conversations between the health system and the Wayne County Railroaders Association soon followed, and Reid eventually donated the caboose to the club with the promise to cover moving expenses.

"Reid took care of everything as far as moving it and the decorative fence that sits around it," Vonderhaar said.

Supplied Photo: Courtesy of DAJO PhotosThe caboose first was moved to a family farm on Milton Road where the club began working to restore it. Deteriorated wood was removed and replaced, and it was repainted.

Discussions with local officials in Richmond and other communities about a permanent home led to the Centerville Town Council jumping at the chance, according to Vonderhaar, resulting in the caboose's relocation to Maplewood Park.

A ramp and deck were added in the weeks leading up to Saturday's dedication ceremony, but there's more work yet to be done. The club eventually would like to restore the interior to its original look.

"There's one just like it in Illinois that we want to use as our example," Vonderhaar said.

Only five other cabooses like this one remain in the world, with some residing overseas, according to Vonderhaar.

"We love the history of the railroad. It's so interesting to see how they did things back in those days," he said. "It's quite a piece of history."

COVID-19 Vaccinations at Urgent Cares, Ready Care Put on Pause

Posted August 30, 2021

COVID-19 vaccinations at Reid Health's Urgent Care facilities in Richmond and Connersville and Reid Ready Care at the Richmond Meijer store have been paused to reduce the amount of foot traffic at the sites.

All three locations recently have seen an increase in those needing urgent care services.

"The numbers of patients we're now seeing at those facilities have led to unusually long wait times," said Misti Foust-Cofield, Vice President/Chief Nursing Officer for Reid Health. "This change will help to alleviate some of that traffic.

"For those wanting to be vaccinated, there are still several options available, including our convenient clinic in the Kuhlman Center at the Wayne County Fairgrounds."

Reid's Kuhlman Center clinic is open 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Thursday and Saturday and noon-4 p.m. Friday. Appointments are preferred, but walk-ins are welcome.

Vaccinations in Indiana can be scheduled using the state website, ourshot.in.gov, which lists a number of locations from which to choose, including the Kuhlman Center, county health departments, and area pharmacies. The Indiana Department of Health has designated 211 as a call line for assistance.

Ohio residents should use their state website, gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov, to schedule an appointment.

"The numbers of patients we're now seeing at those facilities have led to unusually long wait times. This change will help to alleviate some of that traffic." -- Misti Foust-Cofield, Vice President/Chief Nursing Officer for Reid Health

Everyone 12 and older is eligible to get the vaccine, but only the Pfizer version has been approved by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration for those younger than 18. Reid uses the Pfizer product.

Parents or legal guardians of minor children who will be vaccinated need to be present at the child's appointment.

Those who are moderately to severely immunocompromised are now eligible for a third dose of the Pfizer vaccine. Those appointments also can be scheduled at the Kuhlman Center.

Thursday morning, Reid's COVID-19 hotline will return to serve as the primary contact for all things COVID-related, including testing, vaccinations, and clinical advice. The hotline will be available 8 a.m.-8 p.m. seven days a week by calling (765) 965-4200.

New Visitor Restrictions Coming as COVID-19 Cases Rise Again

Posted August 24, 2021

With COVID-19 again on the rise in the area, Reid Health is putting new visitor restrictions in place, effective at 7 a.m. Monday, Aug. 23.

Under the revised policy, patients will be limited to one visitor per day. At physician offices and outpatient services including outpatient surgery, patients may bring one companion to an appointment.

Exceptions to this policy will be made in some settings, including end-of-life and hospice. Those situations will be managed by nursing leadership.

"COVID-19 once again is spreading quickly through our communities, so we must do what we can to ensure the safety of our patients, their families, and our staff while still providing for the personal connections that are critical to recovery," said Jennifer Ehlers, Reid Health Vice President and Chief Quality Officer.

COVID-19 cases in the hospital have been on the rise since mid-July when the weekly average of patients who were positive for the virus was two. So far this week, that average has been 22.

"COVID-19 once again is spreading quickly through our communities, so we must do what we can to ensure the safety of our patients, their families, and our staff while still providing for the personal connections that are critical to recovery." -- Jennifer Ehlers, Reid Health Vice President and Chief Quality Officer.

Beginning Monday, visitors and companions:

  • Must be at least 14 years old with exceptions at the Reid Health Pavilion for siblings and for end-of-life situations or hospice patients;
  • Must not have COVID-19 symptoms or an elevated temperature (greater than or equal to 99.6 degrees) or have had COVID-19 symptoms or have been directly exposed to someone with COVID-19 within the past 14 days;
  • Must agree to wear a surgical mask (no cloth face coverings are allowed) that covers both their mouth and nose at all times, including while in the patient's room;
  • Must wash their hands or use hand sanitizer often, including upon entry and exit from the patient's room;
  • Must socially distance 6 feet; and
  • Should remain in the patient's room -- except to get food inside the hospital and then return to the room -- or to exit for the day.

Visitors will not be allowed to leave the building and return during the same day, nor will they be able to swap out for another guest during the day. With restrictions in place, we want to help you stay connected. Please click here to fill out a form for one of our staff to deliver to your loved one.

Reid Health Hospice Moving Out of Hospital and Into Its Own Facility

Posted August 24, 2021

Reid Health Hospice is moving a few blocks down the road from the hospital, a relocation that will allow the program room to grow and better serve its patients and their families.

Beginning Monday, Aug. 23, Reid Hospice will operate out of the building at 1913 Chester Blvd. in Richmond.

"We're excited to have more of a presence out in the community," said Jessica Dixon, Director of Hospice for Reid Health. "We'll have more space now for family meetings, public inquiries, and our staff."

Reid Health Hospice provides services in Indiana within a 50-mile radius of the hospital. The program provides support and care for those who are in the last phase of an incurable disease so they can live as fully and comfortably as possible.

Among the services offered are medical care, nursing care, social worker support, bereavement counseling, spiritual support, and volunteer services.

"We're excited to have more of a presence out in the community. We'll have more space now for family meetings, public inquiries, and our staff." -- Jessica Dixon, Director of Hospice for Reid Health

Care can be provided at a patient's home, in nursing homes, at assisted living facilities, and in an in-patient setting based on a person's needs.

"This new location makes for an easier and more dedicated access point for our patients and their families," said Jenny Frame, Hospice Care Coordinator for Reid Health. "It also better meets the needs of our staff as we continue to grow our program."

Office hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday-Friday, but nursing staff are available around the clock.

To make an appointment with Reid Health Hospice or to get more information, fill out the form on the Reid Health website or call (765) 983-3344.

Many School of Radiologic Technology Grads Choose to Stay at Reid Health

Posted August 19, 2021

When the Reid Health School of Radiologic Technology held its annual graduation ceremony recently, the event marked a new beginning -- not the end -- for most of the students' time with the health system. Supplied Photo: Reid Health School of Radiologic Technology Class 2021

Five of the seven graduates in the Class of 2021 are continuing their careers at Reid, furthering a trend since the school's inception.

"The fact that five of our seven graduates remained at Reid speaks to how positive their educational experience was over the past two years," said Roger Preston, Program Director for the School of Radiologic Technology.

"Our students are fully immersed in every activity that takes place within our department, so they know the environment and exactly what their role will be as an incoming employee."

The Reid Health School of Radiologic Technology is a 24-month hospital-based radiography program accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology.

After passing the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists certification exam, graduates can work in General Radiography (X-Ray). With additional training or education, they can specialize in a wide variety of modalities such as Computerized Tomography, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Nuclear Medicine, Sonography/Ultrasound, Interventional Radiology, Mammography, and Radiation Oncology.

"The school provides quality education to students in the growing field of radiology. Graduates have knowledge and skills that are in high demand," said Gene DiTullio, Director of Radiology Services for Reid Health.

"The graduates are well-educated and ready to care for patients and operate radiological equipment. Many immediately move into positions at Reid."

"The fact that five of our seven graduates remained at Reid speaks to how positive their educational experience was over the past two years." -- Roger Preston, Program Director for the School of Radiologic Technology

This year's graduating class included Ashtyn Brown, Brooklyn Cowen, Audrey Felix, Leah Hoskins, Brittany Lodge, Hannah Newland, and Aubrey Simmons. The Outstanding Student Award was presented to Cowen for her academic achievement and clinical accomplishments during her two years of study.

Ten new students began classes this month with eight others continuing on for their second year.

"Reid provides an excellent work environment in a progressive, growing, regional health system with the latest technology, positive co-worker relationships, and increasing opportunities to work in different areas of radiology and different locations," DiTullio said.

"It's for those reasons and more that we have such a successful retention record with the school's graduates and why the school stands out among its peers."

Parkinson's Speech Programs Earn New Round of Grant Funding

Posted August 17, 2021

A pair of Reid Rehabilitation Services therapy programs aimed at helping Parkinson's patients retain their voice have earned a second round of grant funding.

The Parkinson Voice Project, a nonprofit dedicated to helping those with Parkinson's to improve their speech and swallowing, has awarded Reid Health a grant through the 2021 SPEAK OUT! & LOUD Crowd program. Reid also was a recipient in 2020.

Grants were given to hospitals, university speech therapy clinics, private practices, and non-profit organizations. Each receives therapy supplies and free training for their speech-language pathologists and graduate students.

"Up to 90% of people with Parkinson's are at high risk of losing their ability to speak, and swallowing complications account for 70% of the mortality rate in this patient population. Our vision at Parkinson Voice Project is to make our highly effective speech therapy program accessible to people with Parkinson's worldwide," said Parkinson Voice Project's Founder and CEO Samantha Elandary.

The grant program honors Daniel R. Boone, PhD, CCC-SLP, a world-renowned speech-language pathologist and voice expert who recognized in the late 1950s that individuals with Parkinson's could improve their communication by "speaking with intent." Parkinson Voice Project's program combines individual and group therapy to convert speech from an automatic function to an intentional act.

"It's extremely gratifying for a patient to tell me they were able to talk on the phone with a family member and be understood for the first time in a long time." -- Kari Sparks, Speech Therapist for Reid Health

SPEAK OUT! consists of 12 individual sessions with a speech therapist to learn training and exercises, while a weekly group session, The LOUD Crowd, provides support and maintenance.

"Through SPEAK OUT! and LOUD Crowd, we teach our patients to utilize 'intent' so they can effectively communicate with loved ones," said Kari Sparks, Speech Therapist for Reid Health. "It's extremely gratifying for a patient to tell me they were able to talk on the phone with a family member and be understood for the first time in a long time."

The SPEAK OUT! individual sessions are billed through insurance programs and the group session is free. SPEAK OUT! requires a physician referral.

For more information about the programs, fill out the form on the Reid Health website or call Reid Rehabilitation Services at (765) 983-3092.

About Parkinson Voice Project

Parkinson Voice Project is the only 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization in the world solely dedicated to helping individuals with Parkinson's improve their speech and swallowing. The organization runs a speech therapy clinic in the Dallas-Fort Worth area and hosts the World's Largest Parkinson's Chorus.

Parkinson Voice Project hosts daily online speech practice sessions to support and encourage people with Parkinson's globally. These sessions are available on the organization's website. Parkinson Voice Project has trained more than 3,500 speech-language pathologists in its SPEAK OUT! & LOUD Crowd program, including clinicians in Australia, Canada, Israel, Italy, Greece, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, New Zealand, South Africa, Taiwan, and the United Kingdom.

76 Counties Can Resume Feeding Birds

Posted August 11, 2021

The Indiana Department of Natural Resources announced today that Hoosiers in 76 counties across the state can resume feeding birds but asks that residents of the remaining counties keep their feeders down while the investigation into what is killing songbirds continues.

DNR recommended a statewide moratorium on bird feeding on June 25 to slow the spread of a still-undetermined illness that is killing birds across the state. Hoosiers answered the call, removing feeders, cleaning birdbaths, and submitting more than 3,400 reports of sick or dead birds. DNR biologists believe there to be more than 500 cases in 72 counties that involve a very specific set of clinical signs (crusty eyes, eye discharge, and/or neurological issues).

Based on the data, it appears that the bird illness is consistently affecting specific areas. There is no imminent threat to people, the population of specific bird species, or to the overall population of birds in Indiana.

DNR recommends that residents of the following counties continue to refrain from feeding birds: Allen, Carroll, Clark, Floyd, Hamilton, Hancock, Hendricks, Johnson, Lake, Marion, Monroe, Morgan, Porter, St. Joseph, Tippecanoe, Whitley.

Residents of other counties may again put out their feeders. Seed and suet feeders should be cleaned at least once every two weeks by scrubbing feeders with soap and water, followed by a short soak in a 10% bleach solution. Feeders should be thoroughly rinsed and dried before being filled with birdseed. Hummingbird feeders should be cleaned at least one a week with a 10% bleach solution and rinsed thoroughly.

The USGS National Wildlife Health Center's avian disease experts are working to determine the cause of this disease outbreak. Indiana will continue to support the effort by providing samples to the laboratory.

If you see a sick or dead bird with the above symptoms, report it at on.IN.gov/sickwildlife. Reports help DNR staff continue to track this outbreak.

Provide Input on Fish and Wildlife Regulations

Posted August 11, 2021

The Indiana DNR Division of Fish & Wildlife wants to hear your ideas on fishing, hunting, trapping, and other fish and wildlife-related regulations in Indiana, including special permits regarding those topics.

Through Sept. 15, you can use a convenient online form to contribute ideas and provide input on issues the DNR has identified for consideration.

The form is at: on.IN.gov/gotinput

The form – 'Got INput?" – not only allows you to comment on ideas from the DNR Division of Fish & Wildlife, but also allows you to propose your own ideas on any fish and wildlife regulation topic.

Got INput users must register with a username and a password.

Input and ideas can also be mailed to:

Indiana DNR Division of Fish & Wildlife
Attn: Got INput
402 W. Washington St., Room W273
Indianapolis, IN 46204

After Sept. 16, DNR staff will evaluate all comments and determine which ideas to forward for consideration by the Natural Resources Commission.

To view all DNR news releases, please see dnr.IN.gov.

Reid Health Foundation's New Director 'A Wonderful Fit' for the Organization

Posted August 9, 2021

When Megan Broeker's husband, Mark, was considering a position with Reid Health a few years ago, she too did her research into the health system.

As she learned more about Reid and its mission, one particular job caught her eye: The director of the Reid Health Foundation.

"I thought if that position ever became available, I would definitely be interested," Megan Broeker said. "It's like a ministry to the community and to Reid, and to me, that's important."

Broeker's wish recently came true as she was named to the role after serving for more than two years as the executive director of the Drug Free Wayne County Partnership and as the Drug Free Communities grant coordinator at Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County.

She also previously worked for Meridian Health Services.

"Megan's community awareness, enthusiasm, and creativity -- combined with her degrees in management and public health -- brings to Reid Health Foundation a strong sense of stewardship and of the role of healthcare philanthropy," said Randy Kirk, Reid Health Vice President/Reid Health Foundation President.

"Through previous experiences, she already knows many of the foundation's friends and has worked with Reid Health initiatives, such as the Community Benefit program. She is a wonderful fit for Reid Foundation and its mission."

Broeker is a native of Hartford City, Ind., and holds a master's degree in public health from Indiana State University. She and Mark live in Richmond with their two dogs.

"Through previous experiences, she already knows many of the foundation's friends and has worked with Reid Health initiatives, such as the Community Benefit program. She is a wonderful fit for Reid Foundation and its mission." -- Randy Kirk, Reid Health Vice President/Reid Health Foundation President

"We are pleased to have someone of Megan's caliber take the helm at the Reid Health Foundation," said Robin Henry, a member of the foundation's board. "Megan brings to the table a strong background in public health, philanthropy, community involvement, and not-for-profit work. Her skillset is a terrific fit to support and grow the healthcare initiatives in our region."

Recognizing the role of philanthropy to meet community needs, Reid Health looks to the Reid Health Foundation to build relationships and conduct campaigns, events, and planned giving programs. In turn, the foundation generates support for Reid Health and its mission by raising unrestricted funds and donor-designated funds for programs, services, and capital projects. The foundation has existed since 1975.

Broeker is looking forward to helping the foundation grow its programs, events, and fundraising efforts.

"I'm a people person," she said. "I like making connections, helping people, and learning."

IU East School of Natural Science and Mathematics to Welcome New Dean August 15

Posted August 9, 2021

Supplied Photo: Markus Pomper
Markus Pomper

Markus Pomper is the new dean for the Indiana University East School of Natural Science and Mathematics (NSM) beginning August 15. He is currently a professor of mathematics and chair of the Department of Mathematics for the Richmond campus.

"IU East is my academic home," Pomper said. "As dean, my goal is to create a comprehensive undergraduate and graduate experience that includes student research, student community, and co-curricular activities to complement the school's programs."

Additionally, Pomper's goal for NSM faculty and staff is to help them to achieve excellence professionally. For example, he plans to boost development by expanding opportunities for students to research alongside faculty members. He plans to increase student retention, continue creating engaging online courses and earning Quality Matters certifications for a majority of online NSM classes.

The dean of the School of Natural Science and Mathematics has the administrative responsibility for all aspects of the school, providing leadership for student success and retention, faculty recruitment, development and evaluation; program development, assessment and improvement; budget management and fundraising; and other matters related to the continuing well-being of the school and its faculty, staff and students.

Michelle Malott, executive director of Academic Affairs, said Pomper's background and connection to campus makes him an excellent choice to serve as the next dean for NSM.

"Markus brings a level of experience and familiarity with the campus that will serve NSM and IU East well," Malott said. "Throughout his tenure, Markus has increasingly taken on more responsibilities and provided his expertise in so many different areas - from student engagement to course development and leadership to strategic planning - that we are very fortunate to have him grow into this administrative role."

Malott added her gratitude to Mengie Parker, director of Institutional Effectiveness, director of M.S. in Criminal Justice and Public Safety and professor of criminal justice, for chairing the search committee, and the members of the search committee for their excellent work.

Pomper has been part of IU East's NSM faculty for 16 years, over two different appointments. He first worked at IU East from 2000-2014 before he took a position at Roane State Community College in Harriman, Tennessee. He was the dean of Mathematics and Science at Roane State from 2014 to 2019.

In fall 2019, Pomper returned to IU East as a visiting associate professor. He quickly received tenure as an associate professor and was named chair of the Department of Mathematics in January 2020. In April 2021, he was promoted to professor of mathematics.

During his first appointment with IU East, Pomper had achieved tenure and was promoted from assistant professor to associate professor in 2006, and he served as department chair from 2012-2014.

He gained experience developing academic programs for NSM and campus-wide. He was the principal designer of the Bachelor of Science in Mathematics and the Master of Arts in Teaching Mathematics before it transitioned to the collaborative M.A.T. online degree completion program.

As the first coordinator for the First Year Seminar, Pomper designed and implemented the course taught by faculty eager to help students succeed in their first semester.

He has served as president of the Faculty Senate as well as on numerous campus committees for student engagement and retention, academic assessment, and faculty governance.

Pomper has received teaching awards at IU East including the Trustees Teaching Award in 2004; the Horizon Teaching Award in 2002; and he received a Faculty Summer Fellowship in 2001.

Earlier in his career, Pomper was a research assistant and visiting management methods analyst at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Pomper's research interests include Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in the online environment and co-requisite learning support, and development.

He has published articles most recently in the Journal of General Education, Mycologia, and International Journal of Instructional Technology and Distance Learning. He has written and received several grants and presented at conferences on leadership, course development and teaching.

Pomper received his Ph.D. and his Master of Science in Mathematics from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Latest Rise in COVID-19 Hospitalizations Is Different Than Previous Waves

Posted August 9, 2021

Regional COVID-19 case counts, positivity rates, and hospitalizations have been on the rise in recent weeks, suggesting a new wave in the pandemic is upon us.

But the existence of vaccinations and the Delta variant of the virus mean this surge is playing out quite differently than those of the past 17 months, according to Thomas Huth, M.D., Vice President of Medical Affairs for Reid Health.

"It is clear the Delta variant is almost certainly driving the new surge, and it is much more highly transmissible," Dr. Huth said.

"Also, the demographics of hospitalized cases have been significantly different in the past few months. We see a much smaller proportion of the elderly in our cases, no doubt due to the high vaccination rates above age 70."

Across Reid Health's six-county service area in Indiana, nearly 80% of those age 70 and up have been fully vaccinated. The rate for those in their 60s is nearly 70%, but rates fall sharply from there.

  • 50-59: About 43%
  • 40-49: 30%
  • 30-39: About 25%
  • 20-29: About 25%
  • 0-19: About 6% (those under age 12 are not eligible to be vaccinated)

Although there are outliers, the typical hospital case now has several commonalities, according to Dr. Huth. Those patients generally are between the ages of 35 and 65, are at least overweight and are often morbidly obese, have diabetes, and are unvaccinated.

"Now is the time for those who still have not done so to vaccinate to protect themselves because most of the people around them are also unvaccinated and don't understand they are a hazard to others," Dr. Huth said.

"Even younger, healthy people who might not have significant personal risk from COVID-19 illness are nevertheless the route of transmission to at-risk people, almost always unwittingly. Don't they have a social responsibility to help break the chain of transmission?"

Although there are outliers, the typical hospital case now has several commonalities, according to Dr. Huth. Those patients generally are between the ages of 35 and 65, are at least overweight and are often morbidly obese, have diabetes, and are unvaccinated.

National news reports have documented breakthrough cases in which vaccinated people have become infected with COVID-19, but those instances are rare. In Indiana, only 0.179% of those who have been fully vaccinated have had a breakthrough case.

The vaccines also remain highly effective in limiting the severity of the disease in those cases. Only 0.006% of the fully vaccinated have been hospitalized with COVID-19 and 0.002% have died, with the average age of a breakthrough death being 79.

"We knew there would be a small number of people who were fully vaccinated and yet still become infected with COVID-19. No vaccine is foolproof," Dr. Huth said. "But the vaccines also have lived up to expectations in greatly reducing your chances of hospitalization and death."

Misinformation about the vaccines and their effects, particularly across social media platforms, has continued to be a problem. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website includes information addressing some of the more common myths, including:

  • Is it safe to get a COVID-19 vaccine if I would like to have a baby one day? Yes. There is currently no scientific evidence that vaccination causes any problems with pregnancy or fertility.
  • Will the vaccine alter my DNA? No. The vaccines do not interact with your DNA in any way. Material from the vaccines never enters the nucleus of the cell where our DNA is kept.

The vaccines remain highly effective in limiting the severity of the disease in breakthrough cases. Only 0.006% of the fully vaccinated in Indiana have been hospitalized with COVID-19 and 0.002% have died, with the average age of a breakthrough death being 79.

Free vaccinations are available at several Reid Health locations. There is no office fee or copay for vaccination-only visits at any Reid sites.

Everyone 12 and older is eligible to be vaccinated, but only the Pfizer shot has been approved by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration for those younger than 18. Reid's sites use the Pfizer product.

Parents or legal guardians of minor children who will be vaccinated need to be present at the child's appointment.

"We agree with CDC guidelines as well as the American Academy of Pediatrics that people 12 and above should be vaccinated," said William Black Jr., M.D., of Reid Pediatric & Internal Medicine.

"There is no contraindication at this point for vaccination. It is good for the individual as well as the community. Also, the more of this age who are vaccinated, the better chance schools have of remaining open."

Appointments for Indiana residents can be scheduled through the state website, ourshot.in.gov, using either the Firefox or Chrome web browser. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.

Walk-ins also are welcome at some Reid vaccination locations.

"It was tempting to hope the pandemic was nearly over. That hope is now delayed," Dr. Huth said. "We can still get there, but it will take many more of us doing our part and getting vaccinated."

Foundation Opens Application for Lilly Endowment Community Scholarship

Posted August 2, 2021

The 2022 Lilly Endowment Community Scholarship application will be available online beginning Sunday, August 1, 2021 through the Wayne County Foundation. The Lilly Endowment Community Scholarship Program (LECSP) will provide 143 scholarships statewide and 2 scholarship in Wayne County. LECSP scholarships may be used for otherwise unreimbursed full tuition, required fees, and a special allocation of up to $900 per year. The special allocation may cover the costs for required books and required equipment for four years of undergraduate study on a full-time basis leading to a baccalaureate degree at any eligible Indiana public or private nonprofit college or university.

The program, administered statewide by Independent Colleges of Indiana (ICI) and locally in Wayne County through the Wayne County Foundation, is open to all Wayne County residents who:

  • graduate from an accredited Wayne County high school by 2022 and receive their diploma no later than June 30, 2022;
  • intend to pursue a full-time baccalaureate course of study at an eligible college or university in Indiana; and
  • meet the criteria specific to their local community foundation. Visit www.waynecountyfoundation.org for complete information regarding the Wayne County Foundation's application criteria.

Students can learn more about the Lilly Endowment Community Scholarship in Wayne County and apply for this scholarship by visiting www.waynecountyfoundation.org. Applications must be completed and submitted by noon on Tuesday, August 31, 2021 to be considered.

Applications will be evaluated on, but not limited to, the following criteria: Academic Performance, Statement of Future Plans, Extracurricular Activities/Work Experience, Recommendations, Overcoming Adversity, Community Service, and Financial Need. Two finalists will be nominated by the Wayne County Foundation, and their names will be submitted to ICI for final selection of the recipients. Scholarship recipients will be notified in December.

Lilly Endowment created LECSP for the 1997-1998 school year and has supported the program every year since with tuition grants totaling more than $424 million. Nearly 5,000 Indiana students have received Lilly Endowment Community Scholarships since the program's inception.

The primary purposes of LECSP are: 1) to help raise the level of educational attainment in Indiana; 2) to increase awareness of the beneficial roles Indiana community foundations can play in their communities; and 3) to encourage and support the efforts of current and past Lilly Endowment Community Scholars to engage with each other and with Indiana business, governmental, educational, nonprofit and civic leaders to improve the quality of life in Indiana generally and in local communities throughout the state.

Wayne County Foundation is again pleased to offer LECSP for its 25th year in Wayne County. 'We are excited to continue supporting this important scholarship and the opportunity it provides for students in our community,' said Rebecca Gilliam, executive director of the Wayne County Foundation.

Senior Adult Ministry August Meeting

Posted August 2, 2021

The next meeting will be held at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, August 31, at First United Methodist Church, 318 National Road West, Richmond, IN. Dust off your vocal chords and join us for a sing-in.

Come and bring snacks to share and invite a friend for an hour of entertainment and Christian fellowship.

Senior Adult Ministry is an active group of seniors over 50 years old open to all regardless of religious affiliation. The group is guided by Pastor Judi Marshall, Clara Bulmer and Beverly Kirby. These three women actively share their gifts of ministry, hospitality and creativity in planning and organizing the monthly meetings.

For further information, call 765-962-4357.

Cincinnati Reds Great Dave Concepción Will Get ReidRide 13 Under Way

Posted August 16, 2021

There are a few changes to this year's edition of ReidRide but none bigger than how the event will get started.

Dave Concepción, the former Cincinnati Reds standout and a key member of the organization's Big Red Machine teams of the 1970s, will serve as the honorary starter for ReidRide 13.

Supplied Photo:  Dave Concepcion during his playing days with the Cincinnati Reds
Dave Concepcion during his playing days with the Cincinnati Reds.

"Every year, every event should have a new and different twist. We're perpetually experimenting and tweaking," said Randy Kirk, Reid Health Vice President/Reid Health Foundation President.

"This idea -- specifically to pursue a member of the Big Red Machine -- hatched after last year's event. We just wanted to bring a fun, new facet to the ride."

Typically held in July, this year's edition of ReidRide will take place on Aug. 21. The start time also will be a little later than normal, with riders taking off beginning at 8 a.m.

Precautions put in place last year because of the COVID-19 pandemic will return. The routes -- a full 15.5-mile course and a family friendly 8-mile version -- also are the same as before.

"ReidRide allows people to get out and do something active in the community, and it supports a great cause. Many of the participants have said it's one of the safest routes and riding events in our area. They feel good about bringing their children and doing something positive in the community." -- Reid Health Foundation Director Megan Broeker

Maps of routes can be found at ReidRide.org.

While last year's event was capped at 250 participants, but Reid Health Foundation Director Megan Broeker said the hope is to have 500 riders this year.

"ReidRide allows people to get out and do something active in the community, and it supports a great cause," she said. "Many of the participants have said it's one of the safest routes and riding events in our area. They feel good about bringing their children and doing something positive in the community."

For 13 years, ReidRide has provided funding for the Shoes for Kids initiative in partnership with local agencies such as Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County and The Common Good of Preble County. Every $20 raised buys a pair of shoes for a local child, with more than 20,000 pairs given out so far to children across the multi-county region served by Reid Health.

To sign up for ReidRide, or to donate to the Shoes for Kids cause, visit ReidRide.org.

2020 East-Central Indiana Business Climate Survey Results Announced

Posted August 16, 2021

The Indiana University East Business and Economic Research Center (the BERC) of the School of Business and Economics surveyed regional businesses to research the business and economic pulse in East-Central Indiana.

The 2020 East-Central Indiana Business Survey was completed by businesses in September-October 2020 amid of the outbreak of the COVID-19 global pandemic.

This is the fifth year of the survey. The survey is conducted annually as usual in the fall of the reporting year, the findings and outlook derived from the responses of the business operators included in this report do not reflect all the impact of the pandemic on the seven-county region. Since the data was collected, many businesses' plans have been disrupted or changed due to the pandemic. The hope is that this report will still provide a baseline measurement of what area businesses had anticipated versus the actual challenging situation they are currently facing.

In this survey, seven East-Central Indiana counties were included to provide an overview of the business climate of the regional economy.

The survey was sent to more than 750 local business operators in Fayette, Franklin, Henry, Randolph, Rush, Union, and Wayne counties across a wide spectrum of industries including professional services, manufacturing, health care, information technology, retail trade, and banking and financial services. There were 101 participating businesses who completed the survey. Half of the surveyed businesses have operated in their counties for more than 20 years.

The survey was broken down into sections including demographics, performance, expectations, concerns and forecasts for the coming year. A few of the survey highlights indicated that businesses in the region had experienced a much more difficult time in 2020 than the year before and still expected a difficult time in 2021- although not as bad as 2020. While a quarter of the survey participants anticipated that the business and economic conditions in 2021 would remain about the same as in 2020, more than half of them were optimistic and less than one-fifth were pessimistic about the conditions

The survey report is available on the BERC website at iue.edu/business/berc/.

This project would not have been successful without the support and contribution of the Fayette County Chamber of Commerce, the Economic Development Group of Connersville and Fayette County, the Franklin County Chamber of Commerce, Experience Franklin County, Indiana, Inc., the Franklin County Convention, Recreation and Visitors Commission, and Franklin County Welcome Center, the New Castle-Henry County Chamber of Commerce, the New Castle-Henry County Economic Development Corporation, the Randolph County Community & Economic Development Corporation, the Rush County Chamber of Commerce, the Union County Development Corporation, the Wayne County Area Chamber of Commerce and the Economic Development Corporation of Wayne County.

For more information, contact the Director of the Business and Economic Research Center and Associate Professor of Finance Oi Lin (Irene) Cheung, Ph.D., at (765) 973-8497.

76 Counties Can Resume Feeding Birds

Posted August 11, 2021

The Indiana Department of Natural Resources announced today that Hoosiers in 76 counties across the state can resume feeding birds but asks that residents of the remaining counties keep their feeders down while the investigation into what is killing songbirds continues.

DNR recommended a statewide moratorium on bird feeding on June 25 to slow the spread of a still-undetermined illness that is killing birds across the state. Hoosiers answered the call, removing feeders, cleaning birdbaths, and submitting more than 3,400 reports of sick or dead birds. DNR biologists believe there to be more than 500 cases in 72 counties that involve a very specific set of clinical signs (crusty eyes, eye discharge, and/or neurological issues).

Based on the data, it appears that the bird illness is consistently affecting specific areas. There is no imminent threat to people, the population of specific bird species, or to the overall population of birds in Indiana.

DNR recommends that residents of the following counties continue to refrain from feeding birds: Allen, Carroll, Clark, Floyd, Hamilton, Hancock, Hendricks, Johnson, Lake, Marion, Monroe, Morgan, Porter, St. Joseph, Tippecanoe, Whitley.

Residents of other counties may again put out their feeders. Seed and suet feeders should be cleaned at least once every two weeks by scrubbing feeders with soap and water, followed by a short soak in a 10% bleach solution. Feeders should be thoroughly rinsed and dried before being filled with birdseed. Hummingbird feeders should be cleaned at least one a week with a 10% bleach solution and rinsed thoroughly.

The USGS National Wildlife Health Center's avian disease experts are working to determine the cause of this disease outbreak. Indiana will continue to support the effort by providing samples to the laboratory.

If you see a sick or dead bird with the above symptoms, report it at on.IN.gov/sickwildlife. Reports help DNR staff continue to track this outbreak.

Provide Input on Fish and Wildlife Regulations

Posted August 11, 2021

The Indiana DNR Division of Fish & Wildlife wants to hear your ideas on fishing, hunting, trapping, and other fish and wildlife-related regulations in Indiana, including special permits regarding those topics.

Through Sept. 15, you can use a convenient online form to contribute ideas and provide input on issues the DNR has identified for consideration.

The form is at: on.IN.gov/gotinput

The form – 'Got INput?" – not only allows you to comment on ideas from the DNR Division of Fish & Wildlife, but also allows you to propose your own ideas on any fish and wildlife regulation topic.

Got INput users must register with a username and a password.

Input and ideas can also be mailed to:

Indiana DNR Division of Fish & Wildlife
Attn: Got INput
402 W. Washington St., Room W273
Indianapolis, IN 46204

After Sept. 16, DNR staff will evaluate all comments and determine which ideas to forward for consideration by the Natural Resources Commission.

To view all DNR news releases, please see dnr.IN.gov.

Reid Health Foundation's New Director 'A Wonderful Fit' for the Organization

Posted August 9, 2021

When Megan Broeker's husband, Mark, was considering a position with Reid Health a few years ago, she too did her research into the health system.

As she learned more about Reid and its mission, one particular job caught her eye: The director of the Reid Health Foundation.

"I thought if that position ever became available, I would definitely be interested," Megan Broeker said. "It's like a ministry to the community and to Reid, and to me, that's important."

Broeker's wish recently came true as she was named to the role after serving for more than two years as the executive director of the Drug Free Wayne County Partnership and as the Drug Free Communities grant coordinator at Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County.

She also previously worked for Meridian Health Services.

"Megan's community awareness, enthusiasm, and creativity -- combined with her degrees in management and public health -- brings to Reid Health Foundation a strong sense of stewardship and of the role of healthcare philanthropy," said Randy Kirk, Reid Health Vice President/Reid Health Foundation President.

"Through previous experiences, she already knows many of the foundation's friends and has worked with Reid Health initiatives, such as the Community Benefit program. She is a wonderful fit for Reid Foundation and its mission."

Broeker is a native of Hartford City, Ind., and holds a master's degree in public health from Indiana State University. She and Mark live in Richmond with their two dogs.

"Through previous experiences, she already knows many of the foundation's friends and has worked with Reid Health initiatives, such as the Community Benefit program. She is a wonderful fit for Reid Foundation and its mission." -- Randy Kirk, Reid Health Vice President/Reid Health Foundation President

"We are pleased to have someone of Megan's caliber take the helm at the Reid Health Foundation," said Robin Henry, a member of the foundation's board. "Megan brings to the table a strong background in public health, philanthropy, community involvement, and not-for-profit work. Her skillset is a terrific fit to support and grow the healthcare initiatives in our region."

Recognizing the role of philanthropy to meet community needs, Reid Health looks to the Reid Health Foundation to build relationships and conduct campaigns, events, and planned giving programs. In turn, the foundation generates support for Reid Health and its mission by raising unrestricted funds and donor-designated funds for programs, services, and capital projects. The foundation has existed since 1975.

Broeker is looking forward to helping the foundation grow its programs, events, and fundraising efforts.

"I'm a people person," she said. "I like making connections, helping people, and learning."

IU East School of Natural Science and Mathematics to Welcome New Dean August 15

Posted August 9, 2021

Supplied Photo: Markus Pomper
Markus Pomper

Markus Pomper is the new dean for the Indiana University East School of Natural Science and Mathematics (NSM) beginning August 15. He is currently a professor of mathematics and chair of the Department of Mathematics for the Richmond campus.

"IU East is my academic home," Pomper said. "As dean, my goal is to create a comprehensive undergraduate and graduate experience that includes student research, student community, and co-curricular activities to complement the school's programs."

Additionally, Pomper's goal for NSM faculty and staff is to help them to achieve excellence professionally. For example, he plans to boost development by expanding opportunities for students to research alongside faculty members. He plans to increase student retention, continue creating engaging online courses and earning Quality Matters certifications for a majority of online NSM classes.

The dean of the School of Natural Science and Mathematics has the administrative responsibility for all aspects of the school, providing leadership for student success and retention, faculty recruitment, development and evaluation; program development, assessment and improvement; budget management and fundraising; and other matters related to the continuing well-being of the school and its faculty, staff and students.

Michelle Malott, executive director of Academic Affairs, said Pomper's background and connection to campus makes him an excellent choice to serve as the next dean for NSM.

"Markus brings a level of experience and familiarity with the campus that will serve NSM and IU East well," Malott said. "Throughout his tenure, Markus has increasingly taken on more responsibilities and provided his expertise in so many different areas - from student engagement to course development and leadership to strategic planning - that we are very fortunate to have him grow into this administrative role."

Malott added her gratitude to Mengie Parker, director of Institutional Effectiveness, director of M.S. in Criminal Justice and Public Safety and professor of criminal justice, for chairing the search committee, and the members of the search committee for their excellent work.

Pomper has been part of IU East's NSM faculty for 16 years, over two different appointments. He first worked at IU East from 2000-2014 before he took a position at Roane State Community College in Harriman, Tennessee. He was the dean of Mathematics and Science at Roane State from 2014 to 2019.

In fall 2019, Pomper returned to IU East as a visiting associate professor. He quickly received tenure as an associate professor and was named chair of the Department of Mathematics in January 2020. In April 2021, he was promoted to professor of mathematics.

During his first appointment with IU East, Pomper had achieved tenure and was promoted from assistant professor to associate professor in 2006, and he served as department chair from 2012-2014.

He gained experience developing academic programs for NSM and campus-wide. He was the principal designer of the Bachelor of Science in Mathematics and the Master of Arts in Teaching Mathematics before it transitioned to the collaborative M.A.T. online degree completion program.

As the first coordinator for the First Year Seminar, Pomper designed and implemented the course taught by faculty eager to help students succeed in their first semester.

He has served as president of the Faculty Senate as well as on numerous campus committees for student engagement and retention, academic assessment, and faculty governance.

Pomper has received teaching awards at IU East including the Trustees Teaching Award in 2004; the Horizon Teaching Award in 2002; and he received a Faculty Summer Fellowship in 2001.

Earlier in his career, Pomper was a research assistant and visiting management methods analyst at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Pomper's research interests include Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in the online environment and co-requisite learning support, and development.

He has published articles most recently in the Journal of General Education, Mycologia, and International Journal of Instructional Technology and Distance Learning. He has written and received several grants and presented at conferences on leadership, course development and teaching.

Pomper received his Ph.D. and his Master of Science in Mathematics from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Latest Rise in COVID-19 Hospitalizations Is Different Than Previous Waves

Posted August 9, 2021

Regional COVID-19 case counts, positivity rates, and hospitalizations have been on the rise in recent weeks, suggesting a new wave in the pandemic is upon us.

But the existence of vaccinations and the Delta variant of the virus mean this surge is playing out quite differently than those of the past 17 months, according to Thomas Huth, M.D., Vice President of Medical Affairs for Reid Health.

"It is clear the Delta variant is almost certainly driving the new surge, and it is much more highly transmissible," Dr. Huth said.

"Also, the demographics of hospitalized cases have been significantly different in the past few months. We see a much smaller proportion of the elderly in our cases, no doubt due to the high vaccination rates above age 70."

Across Reid Health's six-county service area in Indiana, nearly 80% of those age 70 and up have been fully vaccinated. The rate for those in their 60s is nearly 70%, but rates fall sharply from there.

  • 50-59: About 43%
  • 40-49: 30%
  • 30-39: About 25%
  • 20-29: About 25%
  • 0-19: About 6% (those under age 12 are not eligible to be vaccinated)

Although there are outliers, the typical hospital case now has several commonalities, according to Dr. Huth. Those patients generally are between the ages of 35 and 65, are at least overweight and are often morbidly obese, have diabetes, and are unvaccinated.

"Now is the time for those who still have not done so to vaccinate to protect themselves because most of the people around them are also unvaccinated and don't understand they are a hazard to others," Dr. Huth said.

"Even younger, healthy people who might not have significant personal risk from COVID-19 illness are nevertheless the route of transmission to at-risk people, almost always unwittingly. Don't they have a social responsibility to help break the chain of transmission?"

Although there are outliers, the typical hospital case now has several commonalities, according to Dr. Huth. Those patients generally are between the ages of 35 and 65, are at least overweight and are often morbidly obese, have diabetes, and are unvaccinated.

National news reports have documented breakthrough cases in which vaccinated people have become infected with COVID-19, but those instances are rare. In Indiana, only 0.179% of those who have been fully vaccinated have had a breakthrough case.

The vaccines also remain highly effective in limiting the severity of the disease in those cases. Only 0.006% of the fully vaccinated have been hospitalized with COVID-19 and 0.002% have died, with the average age of a breakthrough death being 79.

"We knew there would be a small number of people who were fully vaccinated and yet still become infected with COVID-19. No vaccine is foolproof," Dr. Huth said. "But the vaccines also have lived up to expectations in greatly reducing your chances of hospitalization and death."

Misinformation about the vaccines and their effects, particularly across social media platforms, has continued to be a problem. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website includes information addressing some of the more common myths, including:

  • Is it safe to get a COVID-19 vaccine if I would like to have a baby one day? Yes. There is currently no scientific evidence that vaccination causes any problems with pregnancy or fertility.
  • Will the vaccine alter my DNA? No. The vaccines do not interact with your DNA in any way. Material from the vaccines never enters the nucleus of the cell where our DNA is kept.

The vaccines remain highly effective in limiting the severity of the disease in breakthrough cases. Only 0.006% of the fully vaccinated in Indiana have been hospitalized with COVID-19 and 0.002% have died, with the average age of a breakthrough death being 79.

Free vaccinations are available at several Reid Health locations. There is no office fee or copay for vaccination-only visits at any Reid sites.

Everyone 12 and older is eligible to be vaccinated, but only the Pfizer shot has been approved by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration for those younger than 18. Reid's sites use the Pfizer product.

Parents or legal guardians of minor children who will be vaccinated need to be present at the child's appointment.

"We agree with CDC guidelines as well as the American Academy of Pediatrics that people 12 and above should be vaccinated," said William Black Jr., M.D., of Reid Pediatric & Internal Medicine.

"There is no contraindication at this point for vaccination. It is good for the individual as well as the community. Also, the more of this age who are vaccinated, the better chance schools have of remaining open."

Appointments for Indiana residents can be scheduled through the state website, ourshot.in.gov, using either the Firefox or Chrome web browser. Ohio residents should use gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov.

Walk-ins also are welcome at some Reid vaccination locations.

"It was tempting to hope the pandemic was nearly over. That hope is now delayed," Dr. Huth said. "We can still get there, but it will take many more of us doing our part and getting vaccinated."

Foundation Opens Application for Lilly Endowment Community Scholarship

Posted August 2, 2021

The 2022 Lilly Endowment Community Scholarship application will be available online beginning Sunday, August 1, 2021 through the Wayne County Foundation. The Lilly Endowment Community Scholarship Program (LECSP) will provide 143 scholarships statewide and 2 scholarship in Wayne County. LECSP scholarships may be used for otherwise unreimbursed full tuition, required fees, and a special allocation of up to $900 per year. The special allocation may cover the costs for required books and required equipment for four years of undergraduate study on a full-time basis leading to a baccalaureate degree at any eligible Indiana public or private nonprofit college or university.

The program, administered statewide by Independent Colleges of Indiana (ICI) and locally in Wayne County through the Wayne County Foundation, is open to all Wayne County residents who:

  • graduate from an accredited Wayne County high school by 2022 and receive their diploma no later than June 30, 2022;
  • intend to pursue a full-time baccalaureate course of study at an eligible college or university in Indiana; and
  • meet the criteria specific to their local community foundation. Visit www.waynecountyfoundation.org for complete information regarding the Wayne County Foundation's application criteria.

Students can learn more about the Lilly Endowment Community Scholarship in Wayne County and apply for this scholarship by visiting www.waynecountyfoundation.org. Applications must be completed and submitted by noon on Tuesday, August 31, 2021 to be considered.

Applications will be evaluated on, but not limited to, the following criteria: Academic Performance, Statement of Future Plans, Extracurricular Activities/Work Experience, Recommendations, Overcoming Adversity, Community Service, and Financial Need. Two finalists will be nominated by the Wayne County Foundation, and their names will be submitted to ICI for final selection of the recipients. Scholarship recipients will be notified in December.

Lilly Endowment created LECSP for the 1997-1998 school year and has supported the program every year since with tuition grants totaling more than $424 million. Nearly 5,000 Indiana students have received Lilly Endowment Community Scholarships since the program's inception.

The primary purposes of LECSP are: 1) to help raise the level of educational attainment in Indiana; 2) to increase awareness of the beneficial roles Indiana community foundations can play in their communities; and 3) to encourage and support the efforts of current and past Lilly Endowment Community Scholars to engage with each other and with Indiana business, governmental, educational, nonprofit and civic leaders to improve the quality of life in Indiana generally and in local communities throughout the state.

Wayne County Foundation is again pleased to offer LECSP for its 25th year in Wayne County. 'We are excited to continue supporting this important scholarship and the opportunity it provides for students in our community,' said Rebecca Gilliam, executive director of the Wayne County Foundation.

Senior Adult Ministry August Meeting

Posted August 2, 2021

The next meeting will be held at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, August 31, at First United Methodist Church, 318 National Road West, Richmond, IN. Dust off your vocal chords and join us for a sing-in.

Come and bring snacks to share and invite a friend for an hour of entertainment and Christian fellowship.

Senior Adult Ministry is an active group of seniors over 50 years old open to all regardless of religious affiliation. The group is guided by Pastor Judi Marshall, Clara Bulmer and Beverly Kirby. These three women actively share their gifts of ministry, hospitality and creativity in planning and organizing the monthly meetings.

For further information, call 765-962-4357.

August Medical Monday to Discuss Lifestyle Changes That Come With Aging

Posted August 2, 2021

As we grow older, aging brings new challenges to consider and needs that must be met. August's edition of Medical Monday will provide tips for managing the changes that come later in life.

"Stages of Change" will be presented by April Coffin and Barbie Will of Reid Behavioral Health and Shannon Fanning and Sarah Logan of Reid Patient Continuum of Care.

The free presentation will begin at 1 p.m. Monday, Aug. 9, at Central United Methodist Church, 1425 E. Main St. in Richmond. Resource tables from Lifestream and the Indiana State Health Insurance Assistance Program also will be available.

To register for the event, call Sharrie Harlin Davis at (765) 983-3000, ext. 4676. Masks are required to attend.

Medical Monday is supported by Reid Health Community Benefit. Harlin Davis started the event when she was working for the Minority Health Coalition and maintained it after joining Reid Health. The event has built a loyal following, averaging 40 to 50 guests each month to learn about various health issues and community programs.

Reid, Meridian Partner for Maternal Treatment Program Called The Nest

Posted August 2, 2021

Reid Health and Meridian Health Services have joined together to launch a maternal treatment program in Richmond called The Nest.

Substance use disorders, drug overdose deaths, and neonatal abstinence syndrome continue to be a significant problem in Wayne County. From January to August 2019, Reid had 543 deliveries and of those, 170 had a positive drug screen at the time of delivery.

The Nest aims to address those issues through integrated mental health, addictions, and medical services for pregnant women and those who have recently given birth.

"The program provides a welcoming and supportive environment where women can go without feeling judged or overlooked," said Erika Brandenstein, M.D., Reid OB/GYN and Medical Director for The Nest.

Discussions between Reid and Meridian began in mid-2017. At the time, Meridian had recently started a maternal treatment program in Delaware County in response to a high number of newborns there being born with neonatal abstinence syndrome and there was interest in replicating the program in Wayne County.

The COVID-19 pandemic delayed initial plans for implementing the program until this year.

"With Meridian's expertise in addictions and recovery, including Richmond's Residential Recovery Center and other maternal treatment programs throughout the state, we found Reid Health to be a great partner with us in providing OB/GYN services for the pregnant mothers here in Richmond," said Gerry Cyranowski, Regional Vice President for Meridian.

"Pairing individual and group addictions counseling with MAT and pre- and post-natal OB/GYN care is essential for the effective treatment of women with an opioid addiction."

"I believe as long as a woman has hope, she has a chance to turn her life around and become the mother she desires to be. The Nest is giving women who are struggling with addiction hope for a new life." -- Erika Brandenstein, M.D., Reid OB/GYN and Medical Director for The Nest

Dr. Brandenstein is certified to prescribe medications used to treat opioid dependence.

"By providing medication-assisted treatment for opioid addiction, comprehensive prenatal care, counseling, and social services, we are giving women hope," she said.

"I believe as long as a woman has hope, she has a chance to turn her life around and become the mother she desires to be. The Nest is giving women who are struggling with addiction hope for a new life."

Those interested in joining the program can fill out a form on the Reid Health website or talk with their provider about getting a referral. The Nest serves women who are currently pregnant, as well as those who are up to two years post-partum. Participants can bring their baby with them.

Six graduate in Family Medicine Residency Program's Class of 2021

Posted August 2, 2021

Reid Health's Family Medicine Residency Program recently celebrated the graduation of its Class of 2021 while also welcoming a new group of residents to the organization.

Six physicians were honored at the graduation ceremony with at least two of those deciding to stay within the Reid Health system.

"We're pleased to have multiple graduates choosing to continue their careers with Reid," said Phillip Scott, D.O., FAAFP, Residency Program Director. "That's certainly one of the considerations that the Reid Health Governing Board had in mind when they endorsed us starting this program."

Those graduating in the 2021 class include:

  • Chase Carpenter, D.O., and Megan Carpenter, D.O., a husband-and-wife duo who will be primary care physicians at Reid Medical Associates;
  • Christopher Gasaway, D.O., who has been accepted into a sports medicine Fellowship with Community Health Network in Indianapolis;
  • Wen Lin, D.O., who will be a primary care physician with St. Vincent in Carmel, Ind.;
  • Darrin Schwartz, D.O., who will be an outpatient primary care physician in Sarasota, Fla.; and
  • Derrick Whiting, D.O., who will decide on his next career step while finishing his residency training in August.

The Carpenters are the latest of the program's 19 graduates so far to choose to continue their careers at Reid. They join Justin Tudino, D.O., who joined the Reid Health Hospitalist team after graduation last year and Kristina Hair, D.O., who went to State Line Family Medicine from the Class of 2018.

"With the program being relatively new, we went through a time where every year there was a number of new things. I feel like we're hitting our stride now." -- Dr. Phillip Scott, D.O., FAAFP, Residency Program Director

Reid's residency program is affiliated with the Kansas City University of Medicine and Bioscience in Kansas City, Mo., and Marian University College of Osteopathic Medicine in Indianapolis. Graduates complete three years of training in family medicine, gaining a wide-ranging experience in the Reid Health system.

The program begins the 2021 year with a full complement of 18 residents, 75 preceptors and five core faculty members: Dr. Scott; Nuzhat Nisa, M.D.; Novera Inam, M.D.; Donald Smith, M.D.; and Tim Kaehr, M.A., LMFT.

The rest of the residents in Reid's program include:

  • Advancing third-years Brandon Baccari, D.O.; Kapesh Kunwar, M.D.; Mehrosh Naseem, M.D.; Nida Noor, M.D.; and Nabeel Uwaydah, M.D.
  • Advancing second-years Jonathan Adams, D.O.; Adebisi Adeyemi, M.D.; Waiel Almardini, M.D.; Kimberly Carhuatanta, D.O.; Dustin Cundiff, D.O.; Ibrahim Khan, M.D.; and Abdallah Saleh, M.D.
  • New residents Kristopher Brott, D.O.; Shruti Dave, M.D.; Tanner Everhart, D.O.; Nicholas Hinkle, D.O.; Joseph Intriago, M.D.; and Sara Khan, M.D.

"With the program being relatively new, we went through a time where every year there was a number of new things," Dr. Scott said. "I feel like we're hitting our stride now."

Transition to Police Department Nearly Complete as FInal Group of Officers Sworn In

Posted August 2, 2021

A transition originally expected to take more than two years to finish is on track to wrap up ahead of schedule after the final group of Reid Health security team members were sworn in as police officers this week.

Officers Braydon Bolos, Cody Hahn, Troy McCauley, and Dereck Tipton took their oaths in front of their families Monday. Bolos and Tipton will begin their work at the Indiana Law Enforcement Academy next month while Hahn and McCauley will take their turn in October.

If all goes to plan, the transition from a security team to a police department will be complete in December.

"This is the culmination of what we started in January 2020. It feels good to see it all come together," said Randy Kolentus, Chief of Police for Reid Health.

"We're so thankful to our officers' families for their support. These guys being gone for eight weeks to attend the academy can be a challenge, and we're grateful for everything their families do to make it work."

"This is the culmination of what we started in January 2020. It feels good to see it all come together." -- Randy Kolentus, Chief of Police for Reid Health

Reid began to transform its security team to a police department early last year, joining other health systems around the state. The move is intended to enhance the security and safety of those who use Reid services.

The change reflects the growth of the health system and the accompanying increase in the need for police assistance. When the intention to establish the department first was announced, Kolentus noted the Richmond Police Department responded to Reid calls almost 900 times in 2019.

The former Security Department has grown from nine officers in 2016 to more than 20 team members today as Reid's geographic footprint has increased and its number of staff has risen to some 3,400 people.

"As we complete our transition to a police department, this final group exemplifies the hard work and dedication needed to succeed," said Jennifer Ehlers, Vice President/Chief Quality Officer. "They have worked extra shifts to support their colleagues, and now it's their turn to begin the journey. We have no doubt they will represent Reid well while excelling at the academy.

"Thank you to their families who manage their personal lives in their absence. It could not happen without their love and support!"

Union County Native Joins Neighborhood Health Center Care Team

Posted August 2, 2021

Supplied Photo:  Miranda Gardner
Miranda Gardner, Nurse Practitioner

As a lifelong resident of Union County, the newest provider at Neighborhood Health Center's Liberty location is excited to bring her passion for wellness to patients in the region.

"The opportunity to come back to my hometown to provide healthcare services feels like it was meant to be," said Miranda Gardner, Nurse Practitioner. "Being a local person who understands and is invested in the community will help me establish strong patient relationships and grow wellness within the community. I am thrilled to join the team at Union County Medical Center."

She was inspired to go into healthcare after watching her parents dedicate themselves to helping others during her childhood – her father as a first responder and volunteer firefighter, and her mother as a radiologic technologist and mammographer.

Gardner received her BSN in 2007 and her MSN in 2018 from Indiana University East. She has worked in the Emergency Department at Reid Health for the past 16 years, including as an RN and most recently as a nurse practitioner. She said she's looking forward to the shift to primary care. "Primary care is a special place that allows you to become invested in individuals and their families. I am excited about that."

She expects to be involved with many Union County and Liberty organizations, including schools, the county health department, Head Start programs and more. "I hope I can be a resource for the community and develop strong relationships with all of our wonderful organizations."

Miranda is accepting new patients. Patients wishing to schedule an appointment can call Union County Medical Center at 765-458-5191.

Reid Health, CareSource Reach Agreement on Marketplace Insurance Plans

Posted July 26, 2021

Reid Health and CareSource announced today that Reid is in network for CareSource Indiana Marketplace plans, providing more access to quality healthcare services for Hoosiers. This change went into effect July 1, 2021.

The partnership allows CareSource Indiana Marketplace members in-network access to the large scope of Reid Health hospitals, surgery centers, primary care physicians, laboratory services, specialists, and other healthcare practitioners.

"This agreement is a game-changer for our communities, which will now have a complete insurance solution for our low-to-middle-income families." -- Sharrie Harlin Davis, Community Outreach Coordinator for Reid Health

"This agreement is a game-changer for our communities, which will now have a complete insurance solution for our low-to-middle-income families," said Sharrie Harlin Davis, Community Outreach Coordinator for Reid Health.

CareSource is the only Indiana Marketplace insurance plan that includes all services of Reid Health hospital and Reid Health Physician Associates.

"We want to ensure every person has access to care, and this agreement is one of many steps in providing that access," said Chris Knight, Vice President/Chief Financial Officer for Reid.

"We are thrilled to bring this partnership with Reid Health network to our CareSource Indiana Marketplace members." said Steve Smitherman, President of CareSource Indiana. "Reid Health has a long history of providing quality healthcare to their patients. We look forward to working with them to address the healthcare needs of Hoosiers."

About CareSource

CareSource is a nonprofit, multi-state health plan recognized as a national leader in managed care. Founded in 1989, CareSource administers one of the nation's largest Medicaid managed care plans and offers a lifetime of access to care through health insurance, including Medicaid, Health Insurance Marketplace, Medicare Advantage and dual-eligible programs. Headquartered in Dayton, Ohio, CareSource serves 2 million members in Georgia, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia. CareSource is also a partner in CareSource PASSE, which has been approved as a new option for the Provider-Led Arkansas Shared Savings Entity (PASSE) Program for Arkansans with complex behavioral health and individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. CareSource understands the challenges consumers face navigating the health system and is transforming health care with industry-leading programs that improve the health and well-being of our members.

For more, visit www.caresource.com, follow @caresource on Twitter, or like CareSource on Facebook.

Neighborhood Health Center Looks to Expand Outreach, Convenience

Posted July 26, 2021

Supplied Photo: Cindy Cox
Cindy Cox

As Neighborhood Health Center (NHC) continues to grow and expand services, the facility's team is looking ahead for more ways to take care directly to patients with increased outreach and additional technology.

Cindy Cox, in a new role as Chief Branding Officer, said a big part of her role is to increase collaboration with other community resources and identify ways to make care more mobile for patients. "Adding mobile and community outreach is Neighborhood Health Center's commitment to find new ways to meet the healthcare needs of our community," she said.

NHC already provides MyChart, a patient portal that allows patients to access their healthcare information, send messages to their caregivers, make payments, request prescription refills or view other medical information. More than 54 percent of NHC patients are signed up for the platform. "Bringing services to where they are needed is a way for us to serve patients more conveniently," Cox said. Health education content will be added to MyChart soon.

Carrie Miles, Chief Executive Officer, said NHC is increasing community outreach, with Cox's role including connecting with other facilities, such as extended care, and community organizations involved in helping meet the needs of residents. "Cindy will also be researching how we can improve access to dental services and coordinating events for providers to interact and educate in the community."

The goal of increasing mobile services is to take care to where patients are -- in extended care facilities, group homes, housing areas, senior centers and more, Miles said. "Another element will be ensuring other community organizations know about our services and how we can support them in their individual missions."

Cox said options being considered include finding ways for providers to see patients in their room or apartment, and to perform point of care testing or collect blood draws without patients having to come to the center. "This service will allow patients to receive care in the comfort of their facility. It will be most important during winter months as cold and flu season – and now COVID – settle in. A mobile unit will reduce the risk of exposure for our most vulnerable patients."

Cox is also meeting with other organizations to share about NHC and learn more about what others are doing for patients. "My goal is to build a collaborative relationship with the wonderful community resources that we have in our area. And I want Neighborhood Health Center to be the first place that comes to mind when our community partners think of health services."

Reid Wound Healing Center Adds New Location in Connersville

Posted July 26, 2021

Reid Wound Healing Center is expanding to a new location on the health system's main campus in Connersville.

Beginning next week, the center will be open for appointments 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Mondays on the third floor of the facility at 1941 Virginia Ave. in Connersville.

The new location will offer nearly all the same services currently available at the Reid Wound Healing Center in Richmond.

Misha Mattingly, Clinical Operations Manager for the center, said the expansion will provide greater patient accessibility to accommodate the needs of those living in the Connersville area.

"Over the past 15-plus years, Reid Wound Healing Center has cared for many people from the Connersville community," said Kim Weber, M.D., Medical Director for the center.

"We are very excited to now have the opportunity to provide comprehensive wound care

close to home and expand access for people in the Connersville area who may have challenges traveling to Richmond."

Along with Weber, providers at the Connersville location will include Kendall Alig, N.P., and Amy Frantz, P.A.

"We are very excited to now have the opportunity to provide comprehensive wound care close to home and expand access for people in the Connersville area who may have challenges traveling to Richmond." -- Kim Weber, M.D., Medical Director for Reid Wound Healing Center

The team treats a number of wounds, including:

  • Burns
  • Diabetic foot ulcers
  • Arterial and venous ulcers
  • Pressure ulcers
  • Traumatic ulcers
  • Non-healing surgical wounds
  • Infected wounds
  • Other wounds that will not heal
  • Lower-leg edema
  • Lymphedema

To request an appointment, you can fill out the form on the Reid Health website or call the Reid Wound Healing Center at (765) 983-3300.

Memphis Grizzlies Desmond Bane Hosts Back-to-School Event for Wayne County Youth

Posted July 26, 2021

Memphis Grizzlies guard and Seton Catholic Alumnus, Desmond Bane, is giving back to the Richmond youth by hosting a community day event at Seton Catholic High School. Desmond is partnering with local non-profit, Communities In Schools, to benefit 200 of their Tier 3 students, with backpacks, school supplies, music, food, activities, and community resources. The back-to-school event is presented by Cronin Auto Group and 3Rivers Federal Credit Union. This event is closed to the public.

Bane seeks to give younger children from his own community the resources they need to provide them with the opportunity for a successful future. On this cause, Bane states, "When I was a kid I had dreams of making it! It's a blessing to come back to my hometown and help inspire these kids to chase their own dreams!"

Communities In Schools (CIS) ensures every student, regardless of race and socioeconomic background, has what they need to realize their potential in school and beyond. CIS works with all school districts in the area to provide services to Tier 3 students that include crisis intervention, health screening, mentoring, goal setting, and life skills.

Legacy Philanthropy is an agency assisting professional athletes in their charitable initiatives and is planning this event.

Get to Know Shakespeare at a Free Theatre Workshop

Posted July 21, 2021

Much Ado About Nothing
A Brown Box Theatre Project Workshop
Sponsored by the Richmond Shakespeare Festival
Tuesday, July 27th at 6:00pm at Morrisson-Reeves Library

Supplied Illustration: Much Ado About NothingMorrisson-Reeves Library and the Brown Box Theatre Project present an interactive workshop for people interested in getting to know more about the upcoming Shakespeare production to be held in Richmond, Indiana.

The Richmond Shakespeare Festival is presenting Much Ado About Nothing on July 29 at 8:00pm in the Starr-Gennett Pavilion in the Whitewater Gorge Park. This is a touring production by The Brown Box Theatre Project from Boston, MA. To prepare the audience for the theatre performance, Brown Box is offering a 1-hour interactive workshop at Morrisson-Reeves Library on July 27th at 6:00pm. Reserved seating is required and can be made for this free workshop at: https://buytickets.at/richmondshakespearefestival/526923.

"Whether you are a Shakespeare enthusiast or have a complicated relationship with the Bard, join Brown Box Theatre Project as we look at Much Ado About Nothing. We'll explore what happens when communities, like those in the script, begin to embrace non-traditional ways of thinking," explains teaching artist Surrey Houlker.

This event will be offered with seating setup for social distancing. MRL will be following current CDC guidelines for indoor venues.

For more information, please phone MRL at (765) 966-8291.

IU East Mourns the Passing of Professor Emerita Eleanor L. Turk

Posted July 21, 2021

Supplied Photo: Eleanor L. Turk
Eleanor L. Turk

The Indiana University East community is remembering Professor Emerita of History Eleanor L. Turk who passed away on Sunday, July 18, at her home in Richmond, Indiana. She was 85 years old.

One of IU East's earliest full-time faculty members, Turk is part of the campus' history and leaves a legacy in research, scholarship and travel abroad.

Turk first joined IU East's faculty as an associate professor of history in 1983. In 1990, she was promoted to professor. She retired in 2003 with the title of emerita professor.

Chancellor Kathy Girten remembered Turk for her impact on IU East.

"The IU East community extends its sympathy to Eleanor's family, friends and colleagues," Girten said. "Eleanor will be remembered for her role in helping to shape the university into what it is today. Her influence, intelligence and foresightedness is still present today and ingrained in IU East's history."

Turk helped to develop the curriculum for several courses, and she was the first woman to chair the Humanities and Social Sciences Department at IU East.

In her retirement, Turk remained involved with the IU East community. She often attended the Retired Faculty Breakfast and Spirit of Philanthropy Luncheon.

International travel was a passion for Turk.

She received invitations and grants to research abroad in Canada, Cuba, Germany and South Australia. In all she traveled to 104 countries.

When she retired in May 2003, IU East established the Eleanor L Turk International Studies Scholarship to support undergraduate and graduate students traveling abroad in an accredited study or exchange program.

In 2020, Turk received an Indiana University Bicentennial Medal for her exemplary study abroad leadership and her distinguished contributions to international education.

Before joining IU East, Turk was named as a Fulbright Scholar (1957-1958) and attended the Christian Albrechts Universitat in Kiel, Germany. She participated in seminars on German history at the Europaisch Akademie, Berlin, Germany in 1981 and in 1985. In 1992, she participated in the Fulbright Summer Seminar Deutsche Landeskunde held in Bonn, Berlin, and Leipzig. She received monograph research grants from the German Federal Archives.

TJ Rivard, associate vice chancellor for Academic Affairs, worked with Turk as part of the faculty, and her influence is still with him today.

"Eleanor was an adventurer, not only of the world but of the mind," Rivard said. "She was always curious and could talk about a wide array of topics - history, of course, but also philosophy and German cinema. She was passionate and practical about her teaching, often linking the work and behaviors in the classroom to what students would encounter in the workforce. The best word I know to describe her is ebullient. I will miss her smile, which she almost always wore, and the optimistic way that she approached every challenge and opportunity."

While a professor at IU East, Turk was an active member of the faculty and served on boards IU-wide.

She was appointed to serve on the IU Institute for Advanced Study Board of Directors from 1991-93. She received the IU John W. Ryan Award for Distinguished Contributions to International Programs and Studies in 1995.

Turk authored two books, The History of Germany published in 1999 and Issues in Germany, Austria and Switzerland published in 2003. In addition, she wrote over 40 published articles and authored research grants.

She was a presenter or invited lecturer at close to 70 conferences across the nation and abroad. She was a reviewer for proposals submitted to the Council for International Exchange of Scholars and National Endowment for the Humanities. She was also a consultant for the North Central Association of Colleges and Universities Consultant-Evaluator Corps, 1995-2004, and a member of the President's Council for International Programs from 1985-2003.

Turk received many awards, honors and grants including the Faculty Professional Development Fund Grant for Immigration Field Research to South Australia in 1984; an IU East Library Mini-Grant to build a collection of instructional videotapes in world history in 1994; an IU East Teaching Excellence Recognition Award in 1999; IU East Chancellor's Honors List in 1997; and an IU East Summer Faculty Fellowship in June 2000.

She served within the Richmond and Wayne County community as well. She was the founding member of the board and first president of the Sister Cities of Richmond, Indiana, Inc. with sister city Serpukhov, Russia, from 1987-90 and served on the board in 1990-92 and 1995-97. The program received the Best Overall Program Award in 1989, and the Governor of Indiana's Award for International Relations.

Turk was presented with the YMCA Community Leadership Award, and the Peace and Justice award in 1989. She was involved with the Women's Fund Committee, which went on to establish the women's fund through the Wayne County Foundation in 2004. She was also a founding member and treasurer of the Wayne County Arts Consortium.

As an accomplished photographer, Turk accumulated five awards for her photography.

Turk received her B.A. in in History with a minor in Political Science from Ohio Wesleyan University in 1957. She earned her M.A. in European History with a minor in Diplomatic History from the University of Illinois in 1970. She earned a Ph.D. in Central European History with a minor in Comparative History in 1975 from the University of Wisconsin at Madison.

Turk is survived by her son, Andrew Turk, her brother Frederick Fort, nieces, and many friends, colleagues and former students who remember her fondly.

IU East will host a Celebration of Life to honor Turk's legacy at 2 p.m. on September 2, 2021, in Vivian Auditorium. Memorial contributions may be made to the Eleanor L. Turk International Studies Scholarship:

Indiana University Foundation
c/o Indiana University East
2325 Chester Blvd.
Richmond, Indiana 47374
iue.edu/give

Family and friends are invited to share their memories of Turk on her tribute page at iue.edu/tribute.

Singles Interaction, Inc.

Posted July 20, 2021

Supplied Newsletter:  August 2021 Singles Interaction

If you are 21 years of age or better and single, divorced, widow or widower, Singles' Interaction invites you to join them on Friday nights. Come to the Eagles Lodge, 75 South 12th Street, Richmond (membership not required) and meet other single people in the Richmond area.

Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne county to Open New Location in Western Wayne

Posted July 20, 2021

The Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County are excited to announce the opening of the new Western Wayne Boys & Girls Club at the Western Wayne Schools Administration Building (519 Queen Street, Pershing) this school year. This new Club is the result of a partnership between Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County and Western Wayne School Corporation and the passage of IN HB1008 which provided funding for student learning recovery projects to combat learning loss due to COVID.

"I am thrilled that we will be able to offer Boys & Girls Club to the students of Western Wayne Schools," Lincoln Middle/High School Principal Renee Lakes declared. "We have had excellent after school care for our elementary students for years, but now we are able to offer this for ages 6-18. Since this will be an academic site, we will be able to offer tutoring support as well, which will be great for our middle and high school students!"

Western Wayne Boys & Girls Club will offer the same afterschool programming focused on academic success, healthy lifestyles, and good character and citizenship that are the hallmark of Boys & Girls Clubs across the county with additional emphasis on STEAM and other academic programs. Youth ages 6-18 are able to become members for only $15 annually. Club hours are 2:30-6:30 during the regular school year.

Unit Director Michal McDaniel has high expectations for the Unit's success, noting, "I look forward to working collaboratively with the school board, staff, students, parents, and community. I believe in the impact of the Boys & Girls Club, and I am so excited to open this Club in such a great area."

Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County is looking to hire youth development staff in the Western Wayne area to help staff the Club. Interested applicants should email their résumé to Director of Operations Alicia Painter at apainter@bgcrichmond.org.

"I am so excited for the opportunity to serve more youth at our new Western Wayne Unit," Painter added. "We have been welcomed by the community and we look forward to deepening our relationship with and the impact we have on the youth of Wayne County."

The mission of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County is "to enable all young people, especially those who need us most, to reach their full potential as productive, caring, and responsible citizens." Members of the Club, ages 6-18, have access to dedicated, trained professionals who provide guidance in adopting healthy lifestyles and pursuing educational objectives. Currently, the Club serves over 3,000 youth at five locations: the Jeffers, McDaniel, First Bank, Western Wayne, and Hagerstown units and during the summer at their 168-acre Camp Guy located on the Whitewater River. Since 1957, the Club has been striving to equip young people with the skills they need to succeed in life. For more information, visit www.bgcrichmond.org.

"A Year of Reflection" Art Exhibit at Reid Health

Posted July 14, 2021

Currently on display in the MacDowell Gallery at Reid Hospital is an exhibit of paintings by Richmond artist Sally Hughes. The title of the exhibit is "A Year of Reflection" and it includes many works in oil, gouache and acrylic that were completed during a year of staying close to home during the covid pandemic.

Painting:
"Surf Watchers", Gouache painting by Sally Hughes

Hughes is a self-described "outdoor girl" who loves to paint familiar flowers and landscapes. She says that during this past year she began to pay more attention to the interesting shapes and shadows created by everyday objects such as a gas can or a collection of tools next to the garden shed, and discovered many opportunities to find beauty in the ordinary. She also enjoys camping trips with her husband, and they were able to venture out a few times last summer where she created a series of beach paintings and landscapes that include figures. This art exhibit is definitely worth seeing and many of the pieces are available for purchase.

Painting:
"Zinnias and Glass", Oil painting by Sally Hughes

The MacDowell Gallery is located on the second floor of the hospital and the current exhibit will remain on display through August 5.

Enjoy a FREE Summer Concert on Roosevelt Hill

Posted July 14, 2021

Supplied Flyer: RCO and Bandshell at Glen Miller Park

Richmond Community Orchestra will present a FREE summer concert at the bandshell on Roosevelt Hill, Glen Miller Park, 2200 East Main Street, Richmond, Indiana on Sunday, July 25th at 3:30 p.m. Families are welcome. Bring your lawn chairs!

Neighborhood Health Center Team Makes Sure Patients Don't Let Finances Hinder Care

Posted July 14, 2021

Financial concerns should never be a reason for delaying regular health care – and the team at Neighborhood Health Center works hard to make sure patients don't let money issues keep them from seeing their caregivers.

"Neighborhood Health Center's financial support for patients includes a variety of options," said April Limburg, Chief Financial Officer. This includes patients who don't have coverage or who may have insurance but struggle with co-pays and deductibles.

Supplied Photo: April Limburg
April Limburg

The NHC team provides full support to work with patients on completing paperwork, find eligibility for discounts or coverage options for their care. "Our staff is available to answer questions about billing and coverage," she said.

All NHC patients are automatically screened for financial need at each visit. Through a partnership with ClaimAid, patients are assisted in getting coverage when available, approved for discounts on care based on federal poverty guidelines and assessed for medication help and transportation needs.

Some patients, particularly those with insurance coverage, are surprised to learn they may still qualify for help or discounts because of the number in their household. "Even patients with insurance coverage struggle with their portion of the cost," Limburg said. Even patients with insurance can qualify for help depending on the size of their family and income.

"And our services are offered to all patients, regardless of their payor source," she added. As the center has seen the number of Latino patients grow, Spanish interpreters have been added on site to assist. The center is actively recruiting staff that is bilingual to better serve patients with Spanish as their primary language.

A common misconception she finds among patients seeking care is that many do not realize they qualify for help. "The federal poverty limits are generous. For example, a family of four with an income of $53,000 or less would qualify for help."

"We are here to ensure that regardless of financial status, patients receive quality healthcare." New or existing patients may apply for help. Under Limburg's leadership, NHC has dramatically expanded the number of patients served for financial assistance. "April has done a tremendous job with improving our health center's financial stability. She and her team have created a very strong revenue cycle and have been instrumental in our ability to obtain and utilize grant funding available to community health centers which directly correlates to more services and program for our patients" said Carrie Miles, CEO for NHC.

Limburg recently completed her certification as a Chief Financial Officer through the National Association of Community Health Centers. "This is an elite, six-month long, very intense program that April was able to successfully complete on top of her growing list of daily duties. We are extremely proud and blessed to have her leading our organization financially. Through her and her teams hard work, we have been able to expand our financial assistance for our community."

To begin the process of getting help, Limburg suggests calling (765) 965-4299 to schedule an appointment with a Financial Specialist. The application can be completed before the patient's first appointment.

Paperwork needed for the appointment includes a photo ID, insurance card and proof of income for everyone in the household. Details can be obtained when making the appointment. Spanish translation is also available when needed.

LifeStream Services to Reopen Senior Cafés in August

Posted July 14, 2021

LifeStream Services plans to reopen its 14 public senior café sites beginning August 2. Older adults are invited back to enjoy lunch and socialize with others in their community at the café site nearest to them. A special "welcome back" gift will be distributed at the cafés, while supplies last.

LifeStream Senior Cafés provide nutritious meals on a donation basis to those 60 and over and their spouse. Individuals under the age of 60 can enjoy lunch for a small fee of $6.50. Meals must be reserved at least one day in advance by calling the Senior Café or LifeStream Services at 800-589-1121.

Fayette County Senior Café Site:

  • Fayette Senior Center: Monday – Friday at 11:30am located at 477 N. Grand Ave. Connersville, IN 47331. Reserve a meal by calling 765-827-1511.

Franklin County Senior Café Site:

  • Franklin County Senior Center: Monday – Friday at 11:30am located at 11146 County Park Rd. Brookville, IN 47012. Reserve a meal by calling 765-647-1276.

Delaware County Senior Café Sites:

  • Forest Park Senior Center: Monday – Friday at 11:30am located at 2517 W. 8th St. Muncie, 47302. Reserve a meal by calling 765-289-2517.
  • LifeStream Daleville Office: Tuesday and Thursday at 11:30am located at 14700 Davis Dr. Daleville, IN 47334. Reserve a meal by calling 765-808-9059.

Grant County Senior Café Site:

  • Gas City Café: Wednesday and Thursday at 11:30am located at 401 E. North D St. Gas City, IN 46933. Reserve a meal by calling 765-618-9599.

Henry County Senior Café Site:

  • New Castle Senior Center: Monday – Friday at 11:30am located at 108 S. Main St. New Castle, IN 47362. Reserve a meal by calling 765-521-7414.

Women's Philanthropy Leadership Council Grant to Help Preserve Important History

Posted July 14, 2021

An Indiana University East anthropology professor was awarded a $17,511 grant for a project that will be a major step forward in preserving a special archaeological site in the Lawrenceburg area of Indiana.

Photo:  IU East Assistant Professor of Anthropology Aaron Comstock and Christina Emery, an ethnobotanist at the Archaeological Research Institute
IU East Assistant Professor of Anthropology Aaron Comstock received an IU Women's Philanthropy Leadership Council grant for landscape management and continued public education to help preserve the historic Guard site near Lawrenceburg, Indiana. Comstock works on the project with Christina Emery, an ethnobotanist at the Archaeological Research Institute.

Aaron Comstock, assistant professor of anthropology, said the Women's Philanthropy Leadership Council (WPLC) funds will be used for landscape management, clearing of invasive species and brush, and continued public education about the importance of what is known as the Guard archaeological site.

The project, "Past, Present, and Future Stewardship of Native Village Space: Integrating Indigenous Voices to Preserve our Cultural Landscapes," is one of 14 projects chosen across IU campuses to receive a WPLC grant this year.

"It is an important site for understanding the transition to agriculture among the native inhabitants of this region almost 1,000 years ago," Comstock said.

Comstock has conducted research at the site for almost a decade, including while as a graduate student and a post-doctoral researcher at The Ohio State University. He said he discussed the need for a project of this nature with his colleagues at the Archaeological Research Institute, a non-profit educational organization focused on the Guard site and other important sites in the region. "When I saw the call for the grant came out, it seemed like an excellent match. We are thrilled that the WPLC agreed!"

Rebecca Resetarits, executive director of Women's Philanthropy at IU, said the project meets many of the priorities set for grant consideration by the Women's Philanthropy Leadership Council (WPLC).

"Dr. Comstock's proposal touched multiple focus areas considered by the WPLC," Resetarits said. "The proposal also clearly outlined the critical need for preserving archaeological sites by collaborating with tribal colleagues and restoring native plant life."

Charla Stonecipher, associate director of Women's Philanthropy, said in addition to the areas of focus and collaboration, the project connects the campus to the community.

"The WPLC weighed several factors that led to full funding of this grant request including the service-learning experience for students, connections with the IU East campus and Lawrenceburg community, and particularly, the inclusion of historically underrepresented people. The WPLC looks forward to receiving updates about this project in the coming year," Stonecipher said.

The project is important on several levels. "The first is the need to work with the Tribal colleagues to develop meaningful frameworks for stewarding important archeological sites. Archaeology is a discipline with a colonial past, a history that has led to understandable consternation and mistrust among many Native Americans."

The goal for the Guard site is to convert space over sacred burial mounds to commemorative butterfly gardens and spaces outside of the village boundary to a native species pollinator prairie.

"This approach both meaningfully preserves the space and helps convert portions of the landscape back to native plant species," he said. This stewardship plan represents an important step toward Tribal members and archaeologists working together to understand and preserve important sites that can teach us about the past.

Another factor making the project important is the challenge of such sites being used for farming.

"Many archaeological sites in Indiana are located within agricultural fields," he said. "This poses an important problem considering the root systems of most crops impact delicate sub-surface archaeological deposits. But not farming is rarely an option for farmers in the state who rely on the land for their livelihood."

Part of the project aims to identify crops that can be profitable for farmers while preserving the archeological space under them.

"The project also encourages engagement of the Lawrenceburg community and IU East students in the process of transitioning this site to a stewarded landscape - a partnership that generates a sense of ownership in a shared past."

Comstock hopes the Guard effort helps develop a template that can be used in other sites throughout the region and the state. "We are excited to begin this project and get students and the public involved."

The project work should begin in mid-July and is expected to continue through the summer of 2022.

For more information about the project or archeology studies at IU East, contact Comstock at aarocoms@iu.edu.

About Past, Present, and Future Stewardship of Native Village Space: Integrating Indigenous Voices to Preserve our Cultural Landscapes

A multivocal sustainable land management program is critical for the preservation of archaeological sites. Dangers including erosion, invasive species, vandalism, and looting can be mitigated through a strategy focused on preservation and increased native biodiversity. Students from IU East will be key members of a project combining scientific research and the inclusion of historically unrepresented people.

By building bridges between the multiple stakeholders of local communities, tribal partners, and archaeologists, we can responsibly steward these spaces for future generations. The project establishes a program for preserving archaeological sites by restoring native plant life and improving biodiversity by planting native pollinators. A primary element of this work involves a collaborative partnership with the descendant community (the Miami Tribe) to commemorate and protect sacred spaces with appropriate ground cover, and to develop a persistent landscape informed by traditional plant use.

About the IU Women's Philanthropy Leadership Council

Grants are awarded on an annual cycle from the WPLC Fund, which is administered by the Indiana University Foundation.

Council members, alumni and friends of IU are invited to support the fund with annual contributions. Applications for 2022 grants will be available in fall 2021. The IU Women's Philanthropy Leadership Council was convened by the Indiana University Foundation Board of Directors in 2010. The council's mission is to lead fundraising and engagement efforts that inspire women to give of their time, talent, and resources to Indiana University and to develop women leaders in philanthropy.

Founded in 1936, the Indiana University Foundation maximizes private support for Indiana University by fostering lifelong relationships with key stakeholders and providing advancement leadership and fundraising services for campuses and units across the university.

Starr Gennett Foundation Hosts Music at the Club in 2021

Posted July 12, 2021

Flyer: Starr Gennett Music at the Club

The Starr-Gennett Foundation once again is hosting "Music at the Club" on July 16, August 27 and October 8 at Forest Hills Country Club from 7pm to 9pm. For more information call 765.962.2860.

LifeStream Accepting Applications for Senior Farmers' Market Nutrition Program Vouchers

Posted July 12, 2021

Vouchers for the Senior Farmers' Market Nutrition Program (SFMNP) are available through LifeStream Services until supplies lasts. Vouchers are provided by the state at limited quantities, and will be distributed on a first come first serve basis.

Senior Farmers' Market Nutrition Program vouchers are worth $20 and can be used through October 20. Eligible items include beans, peppers, tomatoes, apples, and other fresh fruit and vegetables. Vouchers can only be redeemed at qualifying locations. Recipients must be 60 years of age or older and meet the income guidelines, which are based on 185 percent of the Federal Poverty Income Guidelines. Review the guidelines, find participating markets, and learn more by visiting lifestreaminc.org/nutrition or call 800-589-1121.

Those interested in receiving SFMNP vouchers will need to apply by calling Dana Pierce, Nutrition Administrator, at 765-808-9059 or Micole Leverette, Community Services Assistant, at 765-620-9907. Those interested can also fill out the application online at lifestreaminc.org/nutrition. Submitting an application does not guarantee the applicant will qualify to receive vouchers. Those who qualify to receive SFMNP vouchers will receive them by mail directly to their residence.

Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County to Host Back 2 School Bash

Posted July 12, 2021

Supplied Flyer: Back 2 School Bash

The Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County is partnering with the Wayne County Health Department to get kids and families ready to go back to school. Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County's Back 2 School Bash will feature a cookout, facepaint, music, book giveaways, and tons of fun. The event is free and open to the public from 3-6pm on July 28th at the new First Bank Boys & Girls Club at the Rev. James M. Townsend Memorial Building (855 N 12th Street).

During the Back 2 School Bash, the Wayne County Health Department will be on-hand to administer free COVID vaccines and school booster shots. Families interested in these vaccinations should register by calling (765) 962-6922 or visiting any Boys & Girls Club by July 16th. Everyone who receives a COVID vaccine during the Bash will be entered in a drawing to win an Xbox.

Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County knows this school year will be better than ever. Help them continue to do whatever it takes for the youth of Wayne County by joining for this free event.

The mission of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County is to enable all young people, especially those who need us most, to reach their full potential as productive, caring, and responsible citizens. Members of the Club, ages 6-18, have access to dedicated, trained professionals who provide guidance in adopting healthy lifestyles and pursuing educational objectives. Currently, the Club serves over 3,000 youth at four locations: the Jeffers, McDaniel, First Bank, and Hagerstown units and during the summer at our 168-acre Camp Guy located on the Whitewater River. Since 1957, the Club has been striving to equip young people with the skills they need to succeed in life. For more information, visit www.bgcrichmond.org.

Recovery Church Has Moved!

Posted July 12, 2021

Flyer: Recovery Church Has Moved

Recovery Church Richmond has moved to 1001 West Main Street, Richmond, Indiana 47374. You can reach them at 765.204.2175 or via email at grace4uanme@gmail.com.

Join Us at the Library for our Annual Musically Spectacular Event!

Posted July 6, 2021

Supplied Flyer: Chanticleer Quartet

Chanticleer String Quartet
Friday, July 30th
2:00 p.m., Upper Level of the Library

Morrisson-Reeves Library presents their Annual Musically Spectacular Event with the world-renowned, Chanticleer String Quartet. The free concert on July 30th at 2:00 p.m. will be held in the Library's Upper Level and Tiffany Reading Room. This concert will be offered with seating setup for social distancing. MRL will be following current CDC guidelines for indoor venues.

Lead violinist and founder Caroline Klemperer-Green explains this year's performance as, "Vivaldi's Seasons will take us through the four seasons that we have weathered during the pandemic, and the Dvorak American Quartet is a joyful celebration of our being together again."

Come early for the best seats.

This program is free and open to the public. No reservations are required. For more information, please phone MRL at (765) 966-8291.

Healthier Lifestyle Choices the Focus of July's Medical Monday Event

Posted July 6, 2021

Looking for tips for how to better take care of yourself? July's edition of Medical Monday might be just what you need.

"Creating a Healthier Lifestyle with Reid Healthier Wellness Club" will be presented by Tajuan Stoker, Director of Wellness at Reid, and Candace Hunt, a Reid Wellness Specialist.

The free presentation will begin at 1 p.m. Monday, July 12, at Central United Methodist Church, 1425 E. Main St. in Richmond. To register, call Sharrie Harlin Davis at (765) 983-3000, ext. 4676.

Masks are required to attend.

Medical Monday is supported by Reid Health Community Benefit. Harlin Davis started the event when she was working for the Minority Health Coalition and maintained it after joining Reid Health. The event has built a loyal following, averaging 40 to 50 guests each month to learn about various health issues and community programs.

Nominations Sought for 2021 Rhoads Humanity in Medicine Award

Posted July 6, 2021

Supplied Photo: Paul S. Rhoads, M.D.
Paul S. Rhoads, M.D.

Nominations are now being accepted for the 2021 Paul S. Rhoads Humanity in Medicine Award.

Any physician recommended for the honor must be a resident of Reid Health's service area and demonstrate one or more of the following traits and achievements:

  • Has a combined commitment to clinical quality (in medical knowledge, discernment, and practice) along with genuine compassion, sensitivity, and a caring attitude in dealing with patients, patient-families, and colleagues.
  • Has been a leader and/or initiator of programs and services resulting in improvement in quality of health or life within Reid's service area.
  • Has been consistently inspirational, encouraging, and helpful to colleagues, hospital staff members, patients, and others in efforts to prevent or to alleviate illness or injury, and to enhance quality of healthcare in Reid's service area.

Physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and previous winners are not eligible to be nominated.

The Paul S. Rhoads Humanity in Medicine Award is East Central Indiana's most prestigious medical honor and has been awarded yearly since 1983. The 2020 winner was Jennifer Bales, M.D., Reid's then-Chief of Staff.

Nominations can be made at reidhealth.org/rhoads/nominations and will be accepted through Friday, July 16.

HYPE Wayne County Launches Leadership Academy

Posted July 6, 2021

HYPE Wayne County (Helping Young Professionals Engage) is excited to announce a new initiative under the Wayne County Area Chamber of Commerce, Wayne County Leads (WC Leads). This in-depth academy will be focused on the next generation of business leaders.

Participants will be selected through an application process and limited to a class of 12. By providing these designated leaders with the skills and knowledge necessary, we will build a community where individuals work for the common good and lead Wayne County to a strong and prosperous future. Topics covered throughout the course include sensitivity training, communication skills, project planning, self-branding, an

d other relevant topics. Each participant will also be assigned a mentor to guide them through the program.

Melissa Vance, Chamber CEO/President stated, "We don't just want our next generation of leaders to survive in the real world. We want them to thrive in it! This leadership program will help young professionals connect with effective leaders throughout Wayne County and benefit from their experience. Businesses will want to promote participation in this program, helping develop talent from within. It is a win for the participant, a win for the business, and a win for the community."

The 12-week leadership course will kick off at the 2021 Business Summit and conclude at the Chamber's 2022 Annual Dinner. In between those events, participants will meet 6 additional times for an afternoon session. Applications for the inaugural class are due July 31st.

If you or an employee at your company is interested in applying or learning more, please reach out to Roxie Deer at Roxie@wcareachamber.org or call the Chamber office at 765-962-1511.

Police Department Transition Nearly Complete As 4 More Graduate From Academy

Posted July 6, 2021

Suppliled Photo: Reid Police Force

Above: Reid Health Police Department's Officer Billy Terhaar (from left), Officer Scott Jackson, Officer Cory Jenkins, Capt. Dennis Perkins, Assistant Chief Jeff Cappa, Officer Scott Roberts, and Chief of Police Randy Kolentus at the Indiana Law Enforcement Academy graduation ceremony on Tuesday.

The end of a journey that began some 16 months ago is in sight as the latest quartet of Reid Health officers graduated from the Indiana Law Enforcement Academy on Tuesday.

By the end of the year, Reid's work to transform its security staff into a police department should be finished, according to Randy Kolentus, Chief of Police for Reid Health.

"We're nearly there now," Kolentus said. "Everyone has done very well throughout the transition. We've come a long way in a short time."

Officers Scott Jackson, Cory Jenkins, Scott Roberts, and Billy Terhaar are the latest to graduate from the academy, having been sworn in back in February before taking part in the eight-week training course.

Kolentus expects to send the next group to the academy in August with the hope that the last of the still-to-be-transitioned staff will start their training in October.

"We're nearly there now. Everyone has done very well throughout the transition. We've come a long way in a short time." -- Randy Kolentus, Chief of Police

Reid began to transform its security team to a police department early last year, joining other health systems around the state. The move is intended to enhance the security and safety of those who use Reid services.

The change reflects the growth of the health system and the accompanying increase in the need for police assistance. When the intention to establish the department first was announced, Kolentus noted the Richmond Police Department responded to Reid calls almost 900 times in 2019.

The former Security Department has grown from nine officers in 2016 to more than 20 team members today as Reid's geographic footprint has increased and its number of staff has risen to some 3,400 people.

"This has been a real team effort with officers working extra shifts to cover for those attending the academy," said Jennifer Ehlers, Reid Health Vice President/Chief Quality Officer. "Their dedication and service to law enforcement, those they serve, and each other is extraordinary and appreciated!"

Kuhlman Center Vaccine Clinic Will Resume Operations July 8

Posted July 6, 2021

Reid Health's free COVID-19 vaccination clinic at the Kuhlman Center on the Wayne County Fairgrounds in Richmond will resume operations on Thursday, July 8.

The clinic paused its work for a few weeks starting June 12 to make way for the Wayne County 4-H Fair.

When the site reopens, it will be in a different location inside the Kuhlman Center. Reid's staff will operate in office space instead of the main hall as they had previously. Those wanting to be vaccinated should enter through the doors on the building's south side.

Hours for the Kuhlman Center clinic will once again be 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Thursday and Saturday and noon-4 p.m. Friday.

"We're excited to get back to work at the fairgrounds after a welcome break. There's still much to be done," said Thomas Huth, M.D., Vice President of Medical Affairs for Reid Health. "The pandemic isn't over yet. We still need many more people to be vaccinated to bring this to an end."

Free vaccinations also are available at Reid's Richmond (1501 Chester Blvd.) and Connersville (1475 E. State Road 44) Urgent Cares from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday-Sunday. The Reid Ready Care Clinic at Meijer is open for shots 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday-Friday and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

There is no office fee or copay for vaccination-only visits at any Reid locations.

Hours for the Kuhlman Center clinic will once again be 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Thursday and Saturday and noon-4 p.m. Friday.

Appointments can be scheduled through the state website, ourshot.in.gov, using either the Firefox or Chrome web browser. The Indiana Department of Health has designated 211 as a call line for assistance.

Walk-ins also are welcome at Reid's vaccination locations.

Everyone 12 and older is eligible to be vaccinated in Indiana, but only the Pfizer shot has been approved by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration for those younger than 18. Reid's sites use the Pfizer product.

Parents or legal guardians of minor children who will be vaccinated need to be present at the child's appointment.

Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County Welcome New Director of Resource Development & Speical Events

Posted June 30, 2021

Supplied Photo:  Sarah Roddy
Sarah Roddy

The Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County welcomes Sarah Roddy as their new Director of Resource Development and Special Events. Roddy received her Master's degree from Indiana University in 2020 and has previously served as Communications & Events Coordinator for Reid Health.

"I am excited to join the Boys & Girls Club because they are helping to shape the future one child at a time," Roddy said of her new position. "The opportunities that the Club provides for the youth of Wayne County are amazing, and I can't wait to help tell the story of the Club and support our future generation."

The role of Director of Development & Special Events is new this year to the Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County. This position is responsible for generating fundraising income through campaign targeting corporations, civic groups, and individual donors within the community.

Roddy is no stranger to community outreach. In addition to her time at Reid Health, Roddy has previously served as President of the Town Board of Mount Auburn, Commissioner of the Western Wayne Girls Softball league, and Philanthropic advisor for Zeta Tau Alpha – Beta Theta Chapter.

"We are very excited to have Sarah join our Management Team," Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County Director of Financial Administration Jennifer Feaster remarked. "She is an excellent fit for our Resource Development goals and special events planning committees."

Supplied Photo: Sarah Roddy and Jennifer Feaster
Sarah Roddy and Jennifer Feaster

Though she's only been at the Club a few days, Roddy already feels at home. Roddy noted, "It's so much fun to walk into work and see all the smiling faces, hear the laughter of the kids throughout the day, and know that my new role helps make that possible."

The mission of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County is to enable all young people, especially those who need us most, to reach their full potential as productive, caring, and responsible citizens. Members of the Club, ages 6-18, have access to dedicated, trained professionals who provide guidance in adopting healthy lifestyles and pursuing educational objectives. Currently, the Club serves over 3,000 youth at four locations: the Jeffers, McDaniel, First Bank, and Hagerstown units and during the summer at our 168-acre Camp Guy located on the Whitewater River. Since 1957, the Club has been striving to equip young people with the skills they need to succeed in life. For more information, visit www.bgcrichmond.org.

LifeStream's Healthy Aging Expo Returns to Offer Drive-Thru Resources

Posted June 30, 2021

The community is invited to attend the drive-thru Healthy Aging Expo on Thursday, September 16. The expo is free to attend and the first 200 attendees will receive a complimentary lunch. Vendors will be set up tailgate style to share resources and all attendees will receive a resource bag with information on local activities and information for older adults.

The community can drive-thru the Healthy Aging Expo between 11:00am to 1:00pm at the Kuhlman Center located at 861 N. Salisbury Rd. Richmond, IN 47374. Attendees will enter at the NW L St. entrance. The Healthy Aging Expo is presented by Reid Health Alliance Medicare, The Leland Legacy, Kicks96, 101.7 The Point, and The Legend 95.3.

We are currently accepting sponsorship and tailgate reservations from organizations who'd like to promote their company at the event through September 1. Those interested in sponsoring and/or tailgating should visit lifestreaminc.org/healthy-aging-expo or contact Micole Leverette, Community Services Assistant, by calling 765-620-9907 or emailing mleverette@lifestreaminc.org.

DNR Recommends Removal of Birdfeeders Statewide

Posted June 28, 2021

Photo from Pixabay: Cardinal at FeederThe Indiana DNR has received reports of sick and dying songbirds from 15 counties statewide. As the investigation continues, the DNR recommends all Hoosiers remove their birdfeeders statewide.

The 15 counties are Clark, Delaware, Hamilton, Jackson, Jefferson, Johnson, LaGrange, Lake, Marion, Monroe, Newton, St. Joseph, Union, Washington, and Whitley.

DNR is working with the Indiana Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory (IN ADDL) and the USGS National Wildlife Health Center to determine the birds' cause of death.

The affected songbirds showed neurological signs of illness as well as eye swelling and crusty discharge.

Several samples have been sent to IN ADDL. All bird samples submitted have tested negative for avian influenza and West Nile virus. Final laboratory diagnostic results are pending.

The following steps are recommended statewide:

  • Use the DNR sick/dead wildlife reporting tool at on IN.gov/sickwildlife to alert DNR staff.
  • Stop feeding birds until the mortality event has concluded.
  • Clean feeders and baths with a 10% bleach solution.
  • Avoid handling birds. If you need to handle birds, wear disposable gloves.
  • When removing dead birds, wear disposable gloves and place birds and gloves in a sealable plastic bag to dispose with household trash.
  • Keep pets away from sick or dead birds as a precaution.

Additional information will be shared when final diagnostic results are received.

To view all DNR news releases, please see dnr.IN.gov.

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Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County Seeks Chief Executive Officer

Posted June 28, 2021

An exciting opportunity to lead the growing Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County (BGCWC) is open, and we are looking for our next Chief Executive Officer to make a positive impact on kids' lives. We're seeking candidates who will lead the overall planning and operation of the organization – while providing leadership, direction and support to the Board of Directors. You will be responsible for bringing the organization's mission to life, as you work to ensure that area kids and teens achieve great futures by delivering a safe and fun space, creating an engaging Club experience, and managing caring professionals to guide them along the way. As a proof point, 54% of Club alumni said the Club saved their life, so the impact you and your team will have on these kids' and teens' lives will be life changing.

The ambition for the future of the organization is to be able to increase the BGCWC's positive impact in the Wayne County area. One way to achieve that is to increase the number of youth served. Improving program efficacy is another way. Some combination of the two is the likely strategy for success. The new CEO will be tasked with setting the vision, garnering the community's support and harnessing the resources to achieve this two-fold impact improvement.

Since its very beginning, the Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County has been about helping children help themselves. This concept has not changed in over 60 years but has evolved with the passing of the years as the torch was handed down from one generation to the next.

BGCWC has been a cornerstone of the Richmond community since opening its doors in 1957. The Clubs provide a safe, structured, and positive environment for young people after school, during holidays, and through summer vacation. We serve over 3,200 youth annually at four locations--the Jeffers, First Bank, McDaniel, and Hagerstown Units, and during the summer at our 168-acre Camp Guy. Our newest location, First Bank Unit, just opened in June and serves the north side of Richmond and residents in the surrounding Housing Authority of Richmond Apartments.

A résumé and cover letter should be sent to Adrian Fryer to ensure full consideration. Adrian Fryer, 678-602-2493, afryer@bgca.org.

Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County Executive Director to Retire

Posted June 28, 2021

Supplied Photo: Bruce Daggy
Bruce Daggy, Executive Director

Bruce Daggy, Executive Director of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County, will be retiring in December 2021 after a long 40-year career within the Boys & Girls Club movement.

Daggy started attending the Club as a young teen and was named the Boys Club of Richmond's Boy of the Year in 1976. Daggy served as a Jr. Staff member that supervised the gym and taught trampoline to other youth members. After graduating from Richmond High School, Daggy went to Indiana University where he earned a Bachelor's degree in Recreational Programming & Leadership in 1981. That same year, Daggy moved up to Michigan where he served as the Program Director for the Boys & Girls Clubs of Lansing at their Northside Unit until 1984. Daggy then was promoted to a Unit Director at their Southside location.

Daggy returned to Richmond to become the third Executive Director of the Scott Boys Club in March of 1993. In 1999, the Club officially changed their name to the Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County and allowed girls to become members.

Over his 28 years of leadership, the Club has seen tremendous growth going from one location with a staff of four serving 85 youth per day with a yearly budget of $164,000 to four units and a summer camp with a staff of 75 that serves over 650 youth per day with a yearly budget of $2.4 million.

"I am so happy that the Club has seen such growth and financial stability over the past 28 years," Daggy reflected.

Daggy's leadership at the Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne county was characterized by community collaborations. One highlight includes the Positive Alternatives Program which ran from 2007 to 2018 supporting juveniles who were suspended or expelled from school or on probation. This project worked in collaboration with all five local school districts and the Wayne County Juvenile Probation Department.Supplied News Article: Bruce Daggy, Youth of the Year 1976

In 2008, the Club became the fiscal agent for the Indiana Alliance AmeriCorps Program which brought AmeriCorps members into 35 other Indiana Boys & Girls Clubs. The Club is also the fiscal agent for the Drug Free Communities Grant supporting the Drug Free Wayne County Partnership.

The Safe Schools, Healthy Students Initiative ran from 2008 to 2013 worked with community leaders to focus on student success and improvements.

In addition to his service as Executive Director, Daggy over the years has served on numerous community committees and boards including:

  • First Bank Richmond Foundation, Board Member
  • Friends Fellowship Community, Board Member
  • Indiana Youth Services Associations, Past President two terms, Peer Review Committee, Executive Committee
  • Richmond Kiwanis Club, Past President
  • Safety Village of Wayne County, Board Member
  • Community Partners for Education, Member
  • Title V Steering Committee, Member
  • Step Ahead Child Care Council, Past President
  • United Way of Whitewater Valley, Fundraising Committee, Vision Council Member
  • County Wide Partnership for Youth, Committee Member
  • Safe Schools, Healthy Students, Committee Member, partner organization

Daggy has also been very active at the state, regional and national levels of the Boys & Girls Clubs of America serving on numerous committees and task forces including:

  • Field Consultant for Planned Giving for Boys & Girls Clubs of America
  • Attended the annual BGCA Leadership Conference (formerly the BGCA Midwest Administrative Conference) and sat on numerous panels for planned giving and board development as well as serving on the planning committee
  • Attended the annual BGCA National Conference and participated in "Making the Ask" panel
  • Attended annual BGCA Legislative Day at the Indiana State House
  • Attended the annual Indiana Area Council Conference and has been a past Secretary
  • Attended and hosted annual Indiana Summit/OKI Summit for staff development
  • Served on Boys & Girls Clubs of America The Professional Association (TPA) Board of Directors, served as Vice President
  • Currently serves on the BGCA Pension Committee

Daggy served as a mentor for four former staff members who have become Executive Directors for other Boys & Girls Club organizations across the United States. Daggy stated he is thankful for and credits his success to "the high quality professional staff and tremendous leadership of the board of directors and board of trustees over the years."

Daggy's vision for the Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County was evident in his ability to recruit dedicated staff members that strive to offer youth-development programs with life-changing outcomes for youth. Daggy also gave great significance to the role of board members, volunteers, and donors in the success of the Club, which is often identified as being a leader by peers across the country and as a leader of the Midwest Region. The Club has been the recipient of multiple awards, including the prestigious national Boys & Girls Clubs of America "Merit Award for Best Overall Programs" in 2010 and again in 2019.

"I am proud of all of my awards and accomplishments," Daggy noted, "but I am most proud of our Clubs BGCA National Programming Awards."

Daggy has been honored over the years with numerous awards including:

  • 2005 Founding Fifty Heritage Club Member for Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County
  • 2010 Professional of the Year from the Indiana Area Council
  • 2011 Boys & Girls Clubs of America Midwest Regional Horizon Award
  • 2012 Boys & Girls Clubs of America Heart & Soul Award
  • 2016 Boys & Girls Clubs of America Masters & Mentors Award (BGCA's Highest honor)
  • 2020 Indiana Youth Services Association Lifetime Achievement Award

The Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County Board of Directors are grateful for Daggy's service and leadership.

"I have known Bruce for over 20 years," Board Member Garry Kleer stated. "He exudes excellence in his leadership of the organization. You understand Bruce's value to the youth when former club members return to speak about the impact he has had on their lives."

Among the many blessings his long career has seen, Daggy feels the "best thing" he has received from the Club is his wife of 35 years, Marie, who he met while was a volunteer at the Club.

A retirement party for Daggy will take place in December with details to be announced.

The mission of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County is "to enable all young people, especially those who need us most, to reach their full potential as productive, caring, and responsible citizens." Members of the Club, ages 6-18, have access to dedicated, trained professionals who provide guidance in adopting healthy lifestyles and pursuing educational objectives. Currently, the Club serves over 3,000 youth at five locations: the Jeffers, McDaniel, Central, First Bank, and Hagerstown units and during the summer at their 168-acre Camp Guy located on the Whitewater River. Since 1957, the Club has been striving to equip young people with the skills they need to succeed in life. For more information, visit www.bgcrichmond.org.

Girls, Inc. To Host "Queen of the Green" and "Golf for a Girl's Future"

Posted June 28, 2021

Girls Inc. inspires all girls to be Strong Smart and Bold! Girls Inc. of Wayne County along with 3 Rivers will be hosting two days of fun August 19th and 20th at the Liberty Country Club Golf Course.

Thursday the 19th will be for all of you non-golfers! Leave your clubs at home, grab a group of friends and become Queen of the Green. Create team shirts or outfits for a chance to win the Team Spirit award, be prepared to get silly in this kingdom while you play a goofy game at each hole! Raffles, 50/50 drawings, Team Prizes, Food, Drinks, and Lots of Fun!

Friday the 20th will be a traditional golf outing so sign your foursomes up now to Golf Fore a Girl's Future.

Visit Girls Inc. of Wayne County on Facebook for more information or call 765-962-2362.

Singles Interaction, Inc.

Posted June 17, 2021

Supplied Flyer: July Singles Interaction Newsletter

If you are 21 years of age or better and single, divorced, widow or widower, Singles' Interaction invites you to join them on Friday nights. Come to the Eagles Lodge, 75 South 12th Street, Richmond (membership not required) and meet other single people in the Richmond area.

Young Artist Camp 2021

Posted May 24, 2021

Photo: Artists' brushes in a paint covered jar. RAM's week long summer art camp is all about fostering your child's creativity!

They will get to create a number of artworks using a variety of mediums and techniques. This art camp is perfect for any kid, but especially one who loves to doodle, colors all the time, or can't put down their paintbrush.

Class instructors:

  • Week 1: (June 14 – 18) Theresa Goss
  • Week 2: (July 12 – 16) Theresa Goss
  • Week 3: (July 26 – 30) Sontina Reid

Details

  • This camp is for students age 5-13 (K – 8th grade).
  • Half-day only in 2021
  • $80 Per Week
  • RAM members receive $10 off registration
  • We cannot offer multiple child discounts at this time.

COVID precautions will be in place during camps. These include required masks, individual kits of art supplies for each camper, and distancing. Classrooms on site at RAM will be unavailable this summer due to construction. ALL 2021 RAM summer camps will be AM camps, 9AM – 12PM. Camps will be held at the Reid Memorial Presbyterian Church on the lower level. Lunches will not be served this year due to venue change.

Click Here to Register for Camp With Ease Online!

Drive-Thru Grab Bag Book Sale at Morrisson-Reeves Library on July 17

Posted July 14, 2021

Supplied Flyer:  Grab a Bag Book Sale

The Friends of Morrisson-Reeves Library will host a Drive-Thru Grab Bag Book Sale on Saturday, July 17th from 10a.m to 1p.m. at MRL, 80 North 6th Street, Richmond, Indiana. $5/bag! Pull into the Library's parking lot and shop from your car!

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Did You Know?

Weeb Eubank, famous NFL coach who directed the Baltimore Colts to a NFL championship in 1959 and guided the upstart New York Jets and quarterback Joe Namath of the old AFL to the world title in 1969 was a Richmond, Indiana native.