News Releases

EAA Ford Tri-Motor to Visit Richmond Airport

Posted June 28, 2021

Supplied Poster: Fly on the FordRecall the energy, passion, and excitement of the Roaring '20s by flying aboard the Ford Tri-Motor. Known as the first luxury airliner, the Ford Tri-Motor redefined world travel and marked the beginning of commercial flight. EAA Chapter 373 will be hosting the Ford Tri-Motor the weekend of July 1-4, 2021 at the Richmond Municipal Airport. The weekend will include flights, food for purchase and picture opportunities with the airplane.

All ticket proceeds support the Experimental Aircraft Association, a non-profit organization dedicated to sharing The Spirit of Aviation with everyone. Our tour stops are hosted by volunteers who are passionate about sharing the Ford Tri-Motor's stories.

Here is your rare opportunity to fly in an authentic Ford Tri-Motor, America's first mass-produced airliner. We invite families to visit and learn all about our aircraft and our organization. Viewing the aircraft is free, so be sure to bring your camera along.

Each flight experience is approximately 30 minutes, of which about 15 minutes will be in the air. You will need to be seated while the Ford Tri-Motor is airborne; however, each seat is located next to a window. EAA's Liberty Museum's Ford Tri-Motor 5-AT-B can carry up to 10. Every seat on the plane is a window seat and it is possible to reserve an entire flight.

An adult must accompany children under the age of 16. Children under the age of 2 can be carried free of charge in an adult's lap. Access to the airplane is easy and not normally a problem for elderly or mobility-limited people. Two normal-sized steps are used to enter the cabin. Seats are individual (no double seats) and separated by an aisle. Seatbelt extensions are available.

Flights run continuously throughout the day (Thursday 2-5PM, Friday through Sunday 9AM-5PM). Please check-in with our crew onsite as early as possible on the day you wish to fly. Contact a Membership Services Representative at 1-800-359-6217 with any questions.

History of the Liberty Ford Tri-Motor 5-AT-B

Liberty Aviation Museum's 1928 Ford Tri-Motor 5-AT-B, serial No. 8, flew its first flight on December 1, 1928. It was sold to Transcontinental Air Transport (TAT, the logo that graces the aircraft's fuselage today) in January 1929 where it became NC9645 and was named City of Wichita. It inaugurated westbound transcontinental commercial air service on July 7, 1929, with sister ship City of Columbus.

In April 1931, ownership of the aircraft was transferred to Transcontinental and Western Air (TWA). Here the aircraft helped in the development of TWA's route system.

In July 1935, NC9645 was sold to G. Ruckstill and entered the fleet at Grand Canyon Airlines. From there the Tin Goose was sold to Boulder Dam Tours in February 1937, where it entered sightseeing air tour service. The Ford was registered AN-AAS with Transportes Aereos del Continente Americano (simply known as TACA Airlines) in Honduras in December 1937, where it stayed until 1942 when purchased by an unknown operator in Compeche, Mexico, and was reregistered as XA-FUB. The registration changed again in 1950 to XA-NET while under the ownership of another individual in Compeche.Supplied Photo: Ford Tri-Motor in the Air

1951 brought major overhaul and repairs for No. 8, including removal of the aircraft's corrugated skin, which was replaced with flat sheet metal. This change earned the aircraft nickname "the smooth-skin Ford." The Tri-Motor was sold to another private owner in July 1953 and was damaged in an accident in January 1954, after which it was put in storage.

Eugene Frank of Caldwell, Idaho, acquired the aircraft in 1955, moving it back to the U.S. and reregistering it as N58996. It remained in storage until July 1964, when it was purchased by Nevada's William F. Harrah of Harrah's Hotel and Casinos. Harrah returned the plane's registration to NC9645 and began an extensive seven- year renovation, bringing the aircraft back to airworthy status and restoring the corrugated skin. The former smooth-skin Ford had its first post-restoration flight in 1971 and flew in Reno several times before being moved to static display as part of Harrah's impressive automobile collection. After Harrah's death, parts of his collection, including NC9645, were auctioned off in June 1986 to high bidder Gary Norton of Athol, Idaho. In February 1990, the Evergreen Aviation and Space Museum in McMinnville, Oregon, acquired the aircraft. It remained in storage there until 1996 when another restoration of the aircraft started, returning it to flying condition once again.

In 2014, the aircraft was acquired by Ed Patrick and the Liberty Aviation Museum in Port Clinton, Ohio. Volunteers ferried the aircraft across the country to its new home. After further maintenance to ensure the aircraft was tour-ready, Liberty entered into a lease agreement with EAA, working together to showcase the historic aircraft around the country.

Lifestream Services to Host Annual Golf Outing to Benefit Seniors, Disabled

Posted June 15, 2021

YORKTOWN, IN – LifeStream Services will host its 12th annual golf outing on August 18 at The Players Club in Yorktown in support of area seniors and people with disabilities. Area golfers are invited to compete for cash and prizes, including a hole-in-one cash prize of $10,000.

Registration is open through Monday, August 16, and the golf fee is $75 for an individual or $280 for a foursome. Registration and a light breakfast begins at 7:30am on August 18 with a 9:00am shotgun start. An awards ceremony and lunch will follow.

Sponsorships start at $200 and increase to $2,500. Benefits can include yard signs on the course, banner placement, complimentary foursome(s), and more. Those interested in participating in the outing or sponsoring may sign up online by visiting lifestreaminc.org/golfouting or contact Angie Jenkins at 765-759-1121 or ajenkins@lifestreaminc.org. Door prize donations are also being accepted.

The proceeds from the LifeStream Golf Outing go directly to fulfilling LifeStream's mission of providing the right information, resources, and support for maintaining independence and improving quality of life for older adults and those with disabilities. LifeStream fulfills their mission by providing a number of programs and services including transportation, in-home care management, home-delivered meals, and much more for over 19,000 seniors and people with disabilities in twelve counties throughout East Central Indiana. Learn more at lifestreaminc.org or call 800-589-1121.

Special thanks to the LifeStream Golf Outing's Presenting Sponsor, Individual Support Services.

Super Summer Fun at the Golay Community Center

Posted June 1, 2021

Supplied Flyer: Summer Fun at the Golay Center

Children, ages 5 and up, can enjoy super summer fun each day at the Golay Community Center! There will be lots of outdoor activies, daily exercise, games, swimming, fun and more! Register now at the Golay Community Center, 1007 East Main Street, Cambridge City, IN 47327. For more information, call 765.478.5565.

Model Ts Return to Richmond for Homecoming

Posted June 1, 2021

As has become the tradition following the 2008 Centennial T-Party that celebrated the 100th anniversary of the Model T, these charming little cars will once again be 'coming home' for three days of fun in Richmond and Wayne County from June 17th through the 19th.

The "Roaring 20's" Homecoming kicks off with two days of driving tours. "On June 17th and 18th, the Model Ts will drive different tours around the area," said Jerry Kramer, tour organizer. "We follow country roads to destinations in and around Wayne County to show off our beautiful scenery." Wayne County is highlighted throughout the tours with plenty of time for visitors to eat and shop not only in Richmond but also in the surrounding communities. "We want folks who are visiting to enjoy all our community has to offer in the way of casual drives, good places to eat, and fun places to visit and shop," added Dr. Michael Johnson, Thursday's tour organizer.

On Saturday, the public is invited to join in the fun as the event moves to the Model T Museum in the Depot District. A Swap Meet will stretch along North 8th St. from North C to E Streets. A vintage car show will wrap around the east side of the Museum featuring vintage cars from the 1940's and earlier. The Car Show is free to show and see and vintage car owners of all makes and models are welcome.

Those wanting to show off their vintage fashions are invited to participate in the Flapper and Bootlegger contests. Dress in your best 20's dresses or your worse bootlegger get-up and see what the judges think! Judging is slated for 11:00.

Have you ever seen anyone put a car together in under 20 minutes? Well, pop in around 10:30 or again at 2:00 and you can! The Quick Assembly team will completely assemble a Model T in 20 minutes or less right before your eyes – and then get in it and drive it! You have to see it to believe it.

Free Seminars on Model T-related and historic topics will be held throughout the day in the Paint the Towne meeting room and Museum's Vintage Garage. The event's featured guest speaker is Bob Casey, retired Curator of Transportation at the Henry Ford Museum. Mr. Casey has appeared in numerous auto-related television documentaries, has written or co-authored three books including Driving America: The Henry Ford Automobile Collection, and is a much sought-after car judge. After retiring, he served on the Ford Piquette Avenue Plant Museum board of trustees and helped design and build Piquette's recreation of the "Secret Room" where Henry Ford and his associates created the Model T. He is scheduled to speak at 11:30.

The Model T Museum is open and free of charge to visitors all day Saturday. Just inside the doors of the main building, the Bruce McCalley Memorial Library and Research Center offers visitors a look at its fascinating collection of Model T-related history. In the main part of the building and across the street in the Agency Building, the Museum features an impressive collection of vehicles including one of the first Model Ts, a one-of-a-kind Snowmobile, a Pietenpol airplane, a fully-restored fire truck, the Vintage Garage, T-related memorabilia, and a gift and book shop.

The Model T Museum located in Richmond is the only museum in the world solely dedicated to the Model T Ford. It is currently open Tuesday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and is located at 309 N. 8th Street, Richmond, Indiana in the Historic Depot District. For more information call the Model T Museum at 765-488-0026.

Wayne County 4-H Fair Announces 2021 Schedule

Posted May 18, 2021

The Wayne County 4-H Fair will talke place June 19-26, 2021.

Download the full schedule here: https://www.waynet.org/topical/pdf/2021/fair2021.pdf

Supplied Flyer:  Pages 1 and 4 of the 2021 Wayne County 4-H Fair Program

Supplied Flyer:  Pages 2 and 3 of the 2021 Wayne County 4-H Fair Program

Learn more about the fair at http://www.wayneco4hfair.com/ or follow them on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/waynecounty4hfair.

Innovative Partnership Launching to Train Future Roadbuilders

Posted June 15, 2021

INDIANAPOLIS - The Indiana Department of Transportation and Indiana Construction Roundtable Foundation (ICRF) are launching a first of its kind partnership bringing Hoosiers cost-free training preparing individuals for careers in the highway and road construction industry.

"BY Roads" uses a nationally recognized construction curriculum to provide students with opportunities to learn directly from industry professionals and be placed into high-paying jobs in highway construction. Students that complete BY Roads will earn NCCER Core, OSHA-10 Certifications, and receive hands-on training in highway construction safety, heavy equipment identification, excavation math, and crane safety and emergency procedures.

"Often people are hesitant to pursue jobs in construction because they don't feel they're qualified or don't have the right employer connections," Chris Price, ICRF President said. "BY Roads removes those obstacles by providing people the skills, confidence and connections they need to pursue work in highway construction.

Beginning June 21st, Central Indiana residents can participate in an 11-week training program focused on skills and safety training needed to succeed in a career in highway construction. Classes will be held in the evenings twice a week. The program is free to students, thanks to funding made available through INDOT. Supportive service funding has also been made available to eliminate student barriers. The program also includes a hiring fair, that will take place near the mid-point of the program. Students will have the opportunity to hire on with a strong group of employer partners, while completing the second half of the program.

"INDOT is grateful to partner with ICRF to bring this program to life to diversify and support the growing needs of Indiana's highway workforce," David Dalton, INDOT Workforce Development Director said. "We're also grateful for the support of Indiana's highway contractors and community-based organizations in supporting unemployed and underemployed Hoosiers in skills attainment leading to a career in highway construction."

Based on current projections, Indiana will need to fill an estimated 19,000 highway construction industry positions by 2028. With highway construction happening at historic levels in Indiana, employers are challenged to find qualified workers to meet the demand. INDOT and ICRF's partnership on BY Roads will connect people with skills and employers with qualified workers to fill positions in highway construction that typically start at $19 per hour or higher.

To enroll in BY Roads, visit https://bytraining.arlo.co/w/.

RAM's 2021 Secret Garden Tour Tickets Available

Posted May 24, 2021

Supplied Flyer: RAM 2021 Secret Garden Tour Ad

The 2021 Secret Garden Tour will be:
Saturday, June 26th 9AM – 3PM
Sunday, June 27th 10AM – 3PM

This annual event gives participants the opportunity to visit some of the loveliest gardens in Richmond and Wayne County. In addition to the gardens, the tour features the Garden Boutique. This marketplace offers unique ironwork sculptures and ornaments for your own landscaping.

While touring the gardens, be on the lookout for plein air artists. Every year we invite artists to document the gardens in their unique way.

All proceeds benefit the Richmond Art Museum.

Feel free to call 765 966-0256 with questions or concerns.

Click here to purchase Secret Garden Tour Tickets online.

New Services Coming to Reid Health Primary & Specialty Care – Cambridge City

Posted June 15, 2021

The list of specialty services available for patient appointments at Reid Health Primary & Specialty Care - Cambridge City is expanding.

Beginning this month, Reid Endocrinology and Richmond Cardiology Associates are offering services at the facility at 1154 South State Road 1 in Cambridge City.

Natalie King, A-GNP, of Reid Endocrinology already has begun seeing patients at the site.

"We're excited to be able to provide easier, hometown access to our endocrinology services to Cambridge City and the surrounding area clientele," said Stephanie Allen, MHA, Specialty Care Practices Director for Reid Health.

Jeffrey Haist, M.D., and John McGinty, M.D., of Richmond Cardiology Associates will see patients in Cambridge City, beginning June 25.

"We have been right down the road in Hagerstown for several years," said Tyler Evans, MSN, RN, Cardiovascular Service Line Director for Reid Health, "but this new location helps patients come to one building if they're being seen by multiple specialties and receive additional services in a timely manner."

In addition to primary care from James Bertsch, D.O., and Ramona Orschell, NP-C, specialty care providers already available for appointments at the Cambridge City facility include Outpatient Behavioral Health and Reid OB/GYN. Laboratory and X-ray services also are located onsite.

For more information or to schedule an appointment, call (765) 935-8941 for Reid Endocrinology or (800) 456-3176 for Richmond Cardiology Associates.

Local Library Users Know Summertime Is an Awesome Time to Visit the Library!

Posted May 27, 2021

Supplied Grahpic: Tails & Tales - Summer Reading at MRLExperience all the fun as Morrisson-Reeves Library (MRL) kicks off its annual Summer Reading Program "Tails & Tales" on Monday, June 7th. Participants can pre-register online at MRLinfo.org or inside the library. On June 7th, patrons can start tracking their reading and activities progress from their digital device, as well as earn badges and prizes, play fun games and learn valuable tips. The program is free and open to the public running through Saturday, July 17.

New this year, track your reading with the online tracking system or ask library staff to track things when you visit at the library.

The library is offering programs for all ages throughout the summer. A wide variety of programs are offered both in-person at the library and virtually through your digital device. If you are wanting to attend programs in-person at the library, registration is required. The library is following current COVID-19 protocols and offering socially distanced services. Links to registration and full program details can be found at https://mrlinfo.org/virtual/.

This year's premiere sponsor is the Friends of Morrisson-Reeves Library.

Morrisson-Reeves Library has served the people of Richmond, Indiana since 1864. MRL is well known for signature services and programs like Storytimes, Free Computer Classes, Reading Clubs, Reader's Advisory, Local History, Research, and 1,000 Books Before Kindergarten. The library's Strategic Plan supports the mission of Connection people to information, inspiration, and infinite opportunities." which positions MRL to respond to area of urgent need: kids unprepared for kindergarten, third grade reading proficiency, high school graduation, college and career readiness and employment resources. We are the community's resource for lifelong learning.

Kinyon Inducted Into Junior Achievement's Eastern Indiana Business Hall of Fame

Posted June 10, 2021

Reid Health President/CEO Craig Kinyon was one of four people inducted Thursday night into Junior Achievement's Eastern Indiana Business Hall of Fame.

Supplied Photo:  Craig Kinyon
Craig Kinyon, Reid Health President/CEO

Kinyon was recognized alongside Roger Golden, President of Golden Engineering in Centerville, and Brent and Kent Fortman, owners of Cutshaw's Market in Cambridge City, during the ceremony at Forest Hills Country Club in Richmond.

"I'm incredibly grateful to be chosen for this honor," Kinyon said. "As much as anything I've done, this is a reflection on the wonderful team members who I've been privileged to work with at Reid and their passion for the communities we serve.

"To put this into the context of a quote, John Donne once said, 'No man is an island, entire of itself; every man is a piece of a continent.'"

According to Junior Achievement, the Business Hall of Fame recognizes individuals who have made significant contributions in their industry in the Eastern Indiana community.

Junior Achievement gives youth a fundamental understanding of business, economics, free enterprise, and the leadership skills needed for a successful future. Programs span K-12 and are provided free of cost to local schools.

"Above all, I am proud to be inducted into the JA Hall of Fame and associated with an organization that focuses on developing youth," Kinyon said. "Everything I have been able to accomplish was the direct result of the family members and mentors in my life who took interest in my success and supported me during my developing years.

"In my adult life, my wife, my children, colleagues, and the leaders I served with were always guiding me to achieve new goals."

Kinyon joined Reid as the health system's first chief financial officer in 1995 and became president/CEO in 2008.

"I'm incredibly grateful to be chosen for this honor. As much as anything I've done, this is a reflection on the wonderful team members who I've been privileged to work with at Reid and their passion for the communities we serve." -- Craig Kinyon, Reid Health President/CEO

Junior Achievement said Kinyon's "list of accomplishments is very long, and the work he has done has been remarkable." Among the efforts highlighted by the organization were:

  • Facilitating a pipeline of physicians to improve the shortage of primary care providers in the region that encompasses Wayne County and eight surrounding counties in Indiana and Ohio.
  • Overseeing expansions of Reid's cardiac, orthopedic, and other specialized services into more rural areas of the region.
  • Assuming ownership of the assets of the former Fayette Regional Health System and re-establishing continuity of access to health care for a community with high-risk medical and socio-economic conditions.
  • Donating a home owned by Reid to JACY, a program of the Children's Justice and Advocacy Center where children are interviewed in a comforting home environment regarding cases of abuse.
  • Serving with a multidisciplinary team to navigate strategies for the novel coronavirus pandemic.
  • Establishing a regional COVID-19 vaccination center to serve a four-county area.
  • Creating the Reid Health Police Department, transitioning the health system's security staff to fully trained police officers.
  • Advocating at the Indiana Statehouse and in Washington, D.C., for healthcare policy through the Indiana Hospital Association and the American Hospital Association.

"I want people to say I was never shy about asking, 'Why do we do it that way?' I have a passion for innovation, and I always look for a better and faster way," Kinyon said. "If you can imagine it and think it through, you can do it."

Reminder: Pause Coming to Kuhlman COVID-19 Vaccine Clinic

Posted June 10, 2021

Reid Health's COVID-19 vaccine clinic at the Wayne County Fairgrounds is about to pause operations for three weeks to make way for the Wayne County 4-H Fair, but the health system will continue to give shots at several other locations during that time.

The Kuhlman Center Vaccine Clinic will temporarily shut down at the end of its operating hours Saturday, June 12 and then reopen after the Fourth of July holiday on Thursday, July 8.

"Our vaccination team has worked incredibly hard since mid-December, and this pause will give them a much-deserved break," said Thomas Huth, M.D., Vice President of Medical Affairs for Reid Health.

"Although the clinic will reopen in a few weeks, we hope those who haven't been vaccinated yet won't wait that long to get their shot."

While operations at the Kuhlman clinic are on pause, scheduled and walk-in vaccinations still will be available at other Reid locations.

Free vaccinations at the Richmond (1501 Chester Blvd.) and Connersville (1475 E. State Road 44) Urgent Cares are available from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday-Sunday. The Ready Care Clinic at Meijer is open for shots 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday-Friday and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

When the Kuhlman Center site reopens on July 8, operating hours there once again will be 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Thursday and Saturday and noon-4 p.m. Friday.

There is no office fee or copay for vaccination-only visits at any Reid locations.

While operations at the Kuhlman clinic are on pause, scheduled and walk-in vaccinations still will be available at other Reid locations.

Appointments can be scheduled through the state website, ourshot.in.gov, using either the Firefox or Chrome web browser.

After an appointment has been made, a link will be sent to complete the registration. That information doesn't have to be filled out before arriving for a scheduled vaccination but doing so ahead of time will speed up the process.

The Indiana Department of Health has designated 211 as a call line for assistance.

Reid has been made a host site by the state with responsibility for helping to vaccinate Wayne, Randolph, Union, and Fayette counties.

County health departments in those areas also are offering vaccinations through their own clinics.

Everyone 12 and older is eligible to be vaccinated in Indiana, but only the Pfizer vaccine has been approved by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration for those younger than 18. Reid's sites use the Pfizer product.

Parents or legal guardians of minor children who will be vaccinated need to be present at the child's appointment.

Natco Community Empowerment Center Saves Community Members $497,940 in Filing Fees

Posted June 10, 2021

For the sixth year, Natco Community Empowerment Center (NCEC) has provided free basic tax preparation services to community members in the Richmond and Connersville areas. NCEC has been a Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) site since 2016.

This year, NCEC prepared and submitted a record 1,158 returns for Natco Credit Union members and individuals and families in our community. In total, this year's Federal refunds were $1.5 million and State refunds were $185,000. The average fee to prepare a tax return is $430*. By providing our services for free, individuals and families saved $497,940 in fees. The community also benefits when the fees saved are spent locally.

"The process Natco Community Empowerment Center (NCEC) implemented during the COVID-19 pandemic was innovative and transformative. Their process allowed them to remain open while other sites were forced to close during the 2019 tax season. Their alternative method added comfort and safety measures for their clients as well as their volunteers. This allowed them to confidently reopen their site for an outstanding 2020 tax season.

My site review unsurprisingly showed that NCEC has met all ten of the quality site requirements and their exceptional approach appeared to be a smooth transition into a new normal."

Cynthia L. Ellis, Senior Stakeholder Relationship Tax Consultant, Internal Revenue Service

Natco Community Empowerment Center provides various no-cost programs and services to members of our community. These include providing a connection to local immediate need resources/assistance programs, job seeking assistance, money management counseling, financial counseling, trainings/classes/workshops and much more. All services are individualized and based around the needs and plans of the individual. NCEC is owned and operated by Natco Credit Union. Programs and services are provided in part through funding from the United Way, Whitewater Valley REMC, and other grants.

* Amounts are based on fees charged by paid preparers as stated in 2020 Annual Survey of Tax Return Preparation Fee by the National Society of Accountants
https://www.nsacct.org/knowledgecenter/income-fees-survey

Natco Community Empowerment Center (NCEC) is located at 1627 E. Main Street, Richmond, IN. For more information about the cooperative, visit www.natcocu.org/ncec

Taco Bell Foundation Awards Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County $12,150 to Fuel Wayne County Young People's Bold Ambitions

Posted June 10, 2021

Supplied Photo:  Boys and Girls Club Members with oversized check.

Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County received a $12,150 grant from the Taco Bell Foundation to support more than 3,000 youth in Wayne County. The funds will go toward Teen Nights, Keystone, Torch Club, and other programs that educate and inspire that next generation of leaders.

"We are honored to partner with the Taco Bell Foundation in championing the educational dreams of our young people," said James Mayer, President of Mayer Management and Owner/Operator of local KFC/Taco Bells. "The vision we share with the Taco Bell Foundation is one in which every young person has access to quality education and the resources they need to create good."

Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County is one of more than 400+ youth-serving organizations that will receive a portion of the $10 million in grants being presented by the Taco Bell Foundation this year. The grants are an example of the Taco Bell Foundation's mission to fuel young people's boldest educational ambitions.

"We are proud to support like-minded organizations through our Local Grants Program," said Jennifer Bradbury, Interim Executive Director of the Taco Bell Foundation. "Together with these organizations, we work to break down barriers so students nationwide can continue creating and innovating. This $10 million is going back to those in our local communities who are most hungry to learn."

About Taco Bell Foundation

About Taco Bell Foundation Taco Bell Foundation, Inc. is a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt public charity that educates and inspires the next generation of leaders through programming like the Live Más Scholarship and the Local Grants Program. Since 1992, the Taco Bell Foundation has reached more than 4 million young people across the country and has awarded more than $110 million in grants and scholarships, focused on education and career readiness. In 2015, Taco Bell and the Taco Bell Foundation launched the Live Más Scholarship, a program aimed at empowering the nation's young innovators and creators. In May 2021, the Taco Bell Foundation awarded $7 million in Live Más Scholarships to 420 students. For more information visit TacoBellFoundation.org.

About Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County

The mission of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County is "to enable all young people, especially those who need us most, to reach their full potential as productive, caring, and responsible citizens." Members of the Club, ages 6-18, have access to dedicated, trained professionals who provide guidance in adopting healthy lifestyles and pursuing educational objectives. Currently, the Club serves over 3,000 youth at five locations: the Jeffers, McDaniel, First Bank, and Hagerstown units and during the summer at their 168-acre Camp Guy located on the Whitewater River. Since 1957, the Club has been striving to equip young people with the skills they need to succeed in life. For more information, visit www.bgcrichmond.org.

Manufacturing Readiness Grants Extended Through 2023, $20M Available for Hoosier Manufacturers

Posted June 10, 2021

INDIANAPOLIS (June 10, 2021) – Applications for the Manufacturing Readiness Grant program, which was launched to stimulate private sector investments to modernize Indiana's manufacturing sector, have re-opened to Indiana manufacturers across the state. Administered by the Indiana Economic Development Corporation (IEDC) in partnership with Conexus Indiana, this program has been extended through June 2023 with matching grants available to help respond to the global COVID-19 pandemic and position Hoosier operations for future growth and prosperity.

"The response we received from Indiana businesses to the Manufacturing Readiness Grant program is proof Indiana companies want to modernize and set themselves up for a successful future," said Governor Eric J. Holcomb. "With one in five Hoosiers working in the advanced manufacturing industry, this funding can truly go a long way to promote future innovation and provide more quality career opportunities for Hoosiers across the state."

First launched in 2020, the Manufacturing Readiness Grants program has awarded $6.7 million in grants to 87 Hoosier companies in 38 counties. The funding has supported technology-based capital investments that are projected to be more than $50 million. Based on the strong response to the program, the Indiana General Assembly appropriated $20 million in the two-year state budget that runs through June 30, 2023.

An array of innovative technologies are being adopted by grant awardees such as the Internet of Things (IoT), cloud computing and analytics, advanced modeling, additive manufacturing, artificial intelligence and cobots. These technologies are being implemented at dozens of small- and medium-sized manufacturers to increase production flexibility and responsiveness to customer demand, gain real-time visibility into equipment performance and operational efficiency and improve workflows that enhance health, safety and workforce productivity.

"While many Indiana manufacturers made digital transformation progress in 2020-2021 with investments in their first production 3D printer, autonomous mobile robot, cobot or other industry technology enabled by the grant, many more need to take steps to ensure their future and accelerate Indiana's digital journey," said Mitch Landess, vice president of innovation and digital transformation at Conexus Indiana. "These grants have given hundreds of companies the confidence to invest in smart manufacturing technologies. The expansion of the grants program will continue to hasten manufacturers' adoption of industry 4.0 technologies and help our state lead in the Fourth Industrial Revolution."

Indiana companies are encouraged to review eligibility requirements and submit applications online.

Grants must be matched by the applicant on a minimum 1:1 basis. Grants undergo a rigorous peer review and recommendation process by a statewide committee of manufacturing professionals representing industry, academia, private equity and more.

About Conexus Indiana

For more than a decade, Conexus Indiana, one of the Central Indiana Corporate Partnership (CICP) non-profit initiatives, has been positioning the Hoosier State as the best place for advanced manufacturing and logistics industries to invest, employ and succeed. By collaborating with industry, academic and public sector partners on a shared vision for an innovative, skilled workforce and stronger business climate, Conexus Indiana has helped to create opportunities for advanced manufacturing and logistics companies, prepare Hoosiers to succeed in the state's largest industry sectors and maintain Indiana's competitive advantage. For more information, visit conexusindiana.com.

About IEDC

The Indiana Economic Development Corporation (IEDC) leads the state of Indiana's economic development efforts, helping businesses launch, grow and locate in the state. Governed by a 15-member board chaired by Governor Eric J. Holcomb, the IEDC manages many initiatives, including performance-based tax credits, workforce training grants, innovation and entrepreneurship resources, public infrastructure assistance, and talent attraction and retention efforts. For more information about the IEDC, visit iedc.in.gov.

Pandemic Fuels Launch of pParenting Podcast Now Incorporated Into Courses

Posted June 8, 2021

An outreach project that began because of the COVID-19 pandemic is another example of something positive resulting during a year full of unprecedented negatives.

"Kids These Days...Tools for supporting children's mental health" is a podcast launched last year by Beth Trammell, Ph.D., HSPP, an associate professor of psychology at Indiana University East. The podcast is designed to help parents cope with the stresses of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Supplied Photo:  Madison Reed &  Zoom Meeting Attendees
Madison Reed takes a photo with her class during a Zoom meeting (top left) Beth Trammell, associate professor of psychology; (middle left to right) Andrá Smith and Alyssa Altieri; and Alisha Morson.

The students work with Trammell on her podcast, "Kids These Days...Tools for supporting children's mental health."

"Parents and teachers are so emotionally fatigued, they can't really think about doing anything extra. Podcasts are an easy way to get information out," Trammell said.

Trammell found her students also interested in the podcast, so she began including them in the process. She has now incorporated the podcast into her courses and expects it to continue long after COVID-19 fades away.

"I had both graduate and undergraduate-level students help by selecting an appropriate topic and then researching the literature to create handouts and talking points for the podcast," Trammell said.

Working on the podcast helped increase understanding of how clinical outreach can reach a wider audience. The format was also a great solution during a time when shutdowns prevented in-person parenting classes and activities.

Julia McCullough, who is majoring in psychology with a minor in neuroscience, said she reached out to Trammell about her interest in working with kids. "She asked me if I would be interested in doing some research and then creating a podcast to present my research to parents," McCullough said.

Clearly she was, so she researched anxiety and anxiety disorders in teenagers. "I began the project by gathering as much information from as many various sources as I could." She developed printed material, talking points for the podcast and finally recorded the presentation with Trammell.

"The process I went through with Dr. Trammell gave me a really good idea of how to apply what I have been learning in my studies to real practice," McCullough said. "It is something I wouldn't have experienced if Dr. Trammell had not given me an opportunity to work with her on the project. I gained experience channeling my work and research to families and children, which gave me a better idea of what my future career may be like if I choose to continue focusing on working with children and adolescents."

Madison Reed is a student in the collaborative IU East and IU Kokomo Master of arts in Mental Health Counseling program. She has worked on three podcast episodes so far.

"Through these episodes, I have gotten to explore the topics of anxiety in young children, the importance of movement, and the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on children in early childhood," Reed said.

The podcast work has illustrated to Reed another way to expand the mental health field beyond an office and cemented her plans to continue in the field and eventually have her own therapy practice. "I hope to continue to normalize mental health conversations and reduce the stigma around mental health issues. Everyone deserves the right to get some extra support if they need it."

Andrá Smith, psychology major, said working on the podcast taught him much about the research process and marketing.

"I was involved in marketing the information with newsletters and professional social media posts," Smith said. "I learned the power of marketing and using design to one's advantage to draw attention."

Trammell said the audience continues to grow, ranging from 40 to 140 downloads per episode.

The podcast can be found on Apple or Spotify, as well as makewordsmatter.buzzsprout.com.

Trammell started her parenting outreach in 2012 under the name Purposeful Parenting.

"I believe that we, as parents, need to focus on our words and actions to deepen our relationship with our kids, as well as decrease our frustration with them when they do things that are age-appropriate -- but slightly annoying to us," Trammell said. "As I engaged parents in community-based workshops, I realized the skills I was teaching would apply to teachers and other community members as well. So I expanded the work to include teachers and caregivers."

The name relates to her belief in the power of words "to impact those around us in good and great ways."

The pandemic that sparked the podcast also created a great option for struggling parents who may not be able to admit they need help.

"Coming to parenting workshops can be really hard because it can be hard to admit to needing help," she said. "By offering that same high-quality information via podcasting, parents can access the information anytime, from the comfort of their own space, without anyone else knowing or judging them."

LifeStream Services is Raising Funds to Keep Seniors Safe & Independent

Posted June 7, 2021

LifeStream Services is seeking the community's support to raise funds to help seniors and people with disabilities remain safe and independent. LifeStream's goal is to raise $10,000 for the Client Assistance Fund which allows LifeStream to purchase emergency and essential items for senior citizens and people with disabilities who are in need.

The Client Assistance Fund consists entirely of generous donations from the community. Last year alone, these donations provided over $20,000 worth of purchases including medical equipment not covered by insurance, utility assistance, food and household essentials, home modifications, and more.

Nancy, a Client Assistance Fund beneficiary, was able to regain her freedom and independence because of the donations made to LifeStream Services. After suffering injuries in a car accident, Nancy lost her ability to walk. She received an electric wheelchair through insurance, but hauling it to appointments and shopping was not an easy task. Nancy needed a manual wheelchair, but did not have the funds to purchase one on her own. The donations to the Client Assistance Fund allowed LifeStream to purchase the wheelchair she needed to remain independent and safe at home.

Donations to LifeStream's Client Assistance Fund can be made online at lifestreaminc.org/client-assistance. You can also mail in a check to 1701 Pilgrim Blvd. Yorktown, IN 47396. Please note Client Assistance on the check. Questions regarding donations can be directed to Angie Jenkins, Outreach Coordinator, at 765-759-1121 or ajenkins@lifestreaminc.org.

Senior Adult Ministry June Meeting

Posted June 7, 2021

The next meeting will be held at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, June 28, at Richmond's Veterans Park, Richmond, IN (via West Main or Johnson Street entrance). A pitch-in is planned.

Senior Adult Ministry is an active group of seniors over 50 years old open to all regardless of religious affiliation. The group is guided by Pastor Judi Marshall, Clara Bulmer and Beverly Kirby. These three women actively share their gifts of ministry, hospitality and creativity in planning and organizing the monthly meetings.

For further information, call 765-962-4357.

Wayne County Extension Homemakers Awards Winners in Competitions

Posted June 7, 2021

Wayne County Extension Homemakers hosted its yearly 2021 Cultural Arts competition at the Raper Center on May 27. Jessica Maupin won the quilt competition with a quilt in black and neon colors; she is a member of the Domestic Engineers club. Judy Dils won the apron competition with an outdoor grilling- themed apron with touches of a Kentucky sports team; she is a member of the Boston Club. These two Wayne County winners were in competition on a state wide level during competition held at the 2021 Home and Family Conference June 1 through 3 in Plainfield IN.

This competition is held yearly except for 2020 during the pandemic. Categories are quilts, needlework, crochet/knitting and other miscellaneous crafts; the special category for 2021 was an apron. Next year's special category is an outdoor garden ornament.

In other news, Linda Hubbell, member of the Rodalla club for 46 years, is the New Castle District recipient of the IEHA Enthusiasm Award. She was nominated by members of her club. Only one Award is given in a District.

Those who nominated Linda pointed out her invaluable Extension Homemaker work over the years in helping with 4-H Fair Open Class exhibits, the Wayne County Quilt Show in past years, and the State Line Basket Retreat. Active in her church, Linda has also done outreach work in the community, helping provide hot meals to those in need.

The 2021 Wayne County EH Scholarship winners were recently announced. The winners are seniors Kate Wilson and Ashlyn Spurrier. Kate is the granddaughter of Andi Angi, a member of the Opportunity Extension Homemakers club; Kate's parents are Colleen Angi and Todd Wilson. She will graduate this year from Centerville/Abington Senior High and plans to attend Indiana University East where she will study Zoology.

"I chose this because I find helping and caring for animals to be very fulfilling," said Kate. She has participated in volleyball, color guard, student government, Leo club, and National Honors Society while in high school.

Ashlyn is the granddaughter of Mary Jane Lafuse, a member of the Boston Township Extension Homemakers club; Ashlyn's parents are Tracy and Jeff Spurrier. She will graduate this year from Richmond High and plans to attend Indiana University-Bloomington where she will study nursing leading to a nurse practitioners degree.

"I am interested in nursing because I want a job that includes hands on patient care," said Ashlyn. She has participated in Girls Varsity Golf, dance at Dixon Dance Studio, and Richmond High School Devilettes and Chamber Choir.

Ashlyn is a 10-year member of the Boston Clever Clovers 4-H Club. Her older sister Mackenzie won a scholarship in 2015, received her Bachelor's degree from Indiana University East and now is a newly-wed who works at Reid Hospital.

If you attend the Wayne County 4-H Fair, be sure to look for the Extension Homemakers booth manned by hostesses who can give you more information about the organization. Or call the Wayne County Extension office at 765-973-9281.

Townsend Center Celebrates 100th Anniversary

Posted June 7, 2021

Supplied Flyer: 100th Anniversary of Townsend Community Center

Townsend Community Center, Inc. will celebrate its 100th Annniversary with a special event on Saturday, June 19th from 6:00 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. Featured guest speaker will be Dr. Deon Jefferson with Freedom Lief Center in McDonough, GA. Due to unforseen circumstances, the venue has been changed to the Richmond Columbian Properties, Inc. Banquet Center at 204 North 10th Street, Richmond, Indiana.

Neighborhood Health Center Care Coordination 'Goes the Extra Mile' for Patients

Posted June 7, 2021

Neighborhood Health Center's (NHC) Care Coordination Program continues to grow in popularity and in successes with patients who participate.

Supplied Photo: Lacrisha Whitley, CQIO
Lacrisha Whitley, CQIO

Lacrisha Whitley is the Chief Quality and Information Officer at NHC and oversees the program for the center's locations in Richmond and Liberty. "Care coordination allows us to go the extra mile for our patients. When we see a need, we act on it," said Whitley, RN, CLC. The program aims to ensure patient care is balanced and addresses all areas of need beyond their physical health – recognizing that health can be directly affected by other factors in a patient's life, such as access to care or financial challenges.

Whitley said the program involves everyone who touches a patient, including front desk staff or the billing team along with direct caregivers. If someone observes or hears of a need of a patient in the program, they immediately try to address it.

Robin Hill, RN, is the coordinator for the Richmond location. She has over 100 patients in her oversight, which often goes above and beyond the obvious. One example involved a homeless man who was in to be seen ahead of a cold front where the temperature was to drop to 20 degrees. He had sores on his feet and did not have socks. "We got him some shoes and socks," she said. After learning he would also be sleeping in an abandoned building in the cold, she went around the office collecting funds to put him up in a hotel that night. "You have to be able to eat and sleep and feel good about yourself before you can be well medically."

The Care Coordination program recently added remote patient monitoring as well, which allows monitoring of blood pressure, weight, oxygen levels, temperature, and blood sugar remotely. Whitley said the technology "is a great way for our care coordinators to monitor trends in vital signs, and call and talk to patients when they see a concern in the data." The addition of the remote home monitoring program was made possible through generous funding in part by The United Way of Whitewater Valley.

Supplied Photo: John Rigney and Robin Hill
Jon Rigney and Robin Hill

Carrie Miles, Neighborhood Health Center CEO, said her coordinators -- Hill in Richmond and Jonathon Rigney, LPN, in Liberty – have the unique ability to establish and build relationships of trust with patients who may have more socio-economic barriers to their health than physical needs. She noted how Hill has developed relationships that encourage patients to come in who may not have had regular care in years. "Patients know she truly cares so over time she has been able to encourage them to have primary care at the clinic," Miles said. Regular visits help make catching health issues in their earlier stages and means better outcomes as a result.

Hill shared how another patient did not read or write and was difficult to persuade to see a caregiver or make lifestyle changes. "Our big accomplishment with her is getting her to drink diet drinks and take a dose of metformin a day for her diabetes. That's an accomplishment – that is step in the right direction."

Rigney said he spends time checking in on patients by phone, sometimes at least monthly. One success story he cited was a woman with diabetes who had what is considered a high hemoglobin A1C – a test that indicates what blood sugar levels are doing over time. In diabetics, caregivers typically want that number to be below 7 – hers was almost 13 when she started in Care Coordination with Rigney. "The patient and I worked together with the provider who sees her every month. I checked in at least once a month to see how she was doing. Over six months, she got down to 6.9. Now she is shooting for 6.5."

Care Coordination also deals with other needs, some of the basic such as transportation. Miles said her facilities work to provide transportation for patients who don't have it. "We can provide assistance such as gas cards, bus passes, sometimes taxis, whatever it takes so they can assess care."

A key for patients in the program is the trust they build with providers and coordinators. "It's that one person the patient knows they can call, and they can depend on. Our patients have a strong relationship with these two coordinators. Robin is the emergency contact for a couple of our patients. Jonathon has a patient who calls him nearly every day. The relationship goes beyond their medical needs; it addresses their social, physical and emotional care as well. Robin and Jon are patient advocates, and they represent what makes our organization special."

Coordinators have helped find food, clothing and even furniture in special circumstances. The center has established a supply of canned food, socks, underwear, T-shirts, blankets, and personal hygiene products to meet needs when they arise. They work with other area organizations to get patients to the right resources.

"Care Coordination is a special program staffed by special people who ensure everything that can be done, is being done, to improve the health and quality of life for our patients," Miles said.

Wayne County 4-H Fair Blood Drive on Tuesday, June 22

Posted June 1, 2021

Supplied Flyer: Blood Drive on June 22, 2021

Join the Wayne County 4-H Fair Blood Drive and SAVE LIVES!

The Bloodmobile will be at the Wayne County Fairgrounds on Tuesday, June 22 from 4:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.

Click here to schedule an appointment, which assists with social distancing.

Photo ID is required. Remember to eat and hydrate before donating. Face masks are required.

Singles Interaction, Inc.

Posted May 17, 2021

Supplied Flyer: Singles Interaction May 2021

If you are 21 years of age or better and single, divorced, widow or widower, Singles' Interaction invites you to join them on Friday nights. Come to the Eagles Lodge, 75 South 12th Street, Richmond (membership not required) and meet other single people in the Richmond area.

Wayne County Foundation Awards $240,398 in Spring Grant Cycle

Posted May 25, 2021

The Wayne County Foundation is pleased to announce that thirty-five different local organizations have been awarded a total of $240,398 through its 2021 Spring Grant Cycle. The funding is to support local programs or projects aimed to enhance the spirit of the community and improve the quality of life across Wayne County.

'Wayne County has so many passionate organizations delivering programming and services vital to our community every single day,' said Foundation Executive Director Rebecca Gilliam. 'We are excited to have the opportunity to play a role in their success and see the impact of the projects receiving funding this grant cycle.'

The Wayne County Foundation's grantmaking is made possible by income from unrestricted and endowed field-of-interest funds. Below is the list of the grant awards approved by the Foundation's Board of Directors at their May meeting.

Organization Project Award
Achieva Resources Corp., Inc. To purchase family resource bags to aid early childhood development $5,000
American Red Cross To provide trained volunteers to support families affected by house fires $5,000
Amigos, the Richmond Latino Center To provide English classes both virtually $7,050
Animal Care Alliance To assist with food purchases for adoptable cats in-house and in foster care $6,000
Birth to Five To support the Parents as Teachers program $2,450
Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County To support the organization-wide traveling arts program $15,000
Brighter Path Inc. To provide scholarships that enable local children to benefit from therapeutic riding services $4,000
Circle U Help Center, Inc. To purchase meal containers, items for senior pantries, and moving equipment $3,000
Communities in Schools of Wayne County To support a mentoring program program and aid homelessness assistance $15,000
Cope Environmental Center To revitalize 'The Outpost educational space $7,550
Every Child Can Read To support the Third Grade Academy - for students struggling to read at grade level $15,000
Friends of Morrisson-Reeves Library To offer a local history book – 'Wayne County Women & Whisky: Wild & Wooly Times in Early Hoosier Taverns on the Old National Road' and corresponding educational scavenger hunt $2,000
Gateway Hunger Relief Center To purchase and install an indoor refrigerator unit $8,000
Girls Inc. of Wayne County To expand programming through the creation of a new S.T.E.A.M. lab $5,594
Hand-in-Hand Adult Day Care To purchase new carpeting for their facility $10,000
Hayes Arboretum To support the expansion of their east side parking lot $7,637
HELP the Animals To fund spay and neuter services $5,000
Independent Living Center of Eastern Ind. To purchase assistive devices for local residents $10,000
JACY House To support body safety classes and enhance organization computer technology $13,621
Junior Achievement of Eastern Indiana To provide in-person and expand online classes for local students $6,145
Levi & Catharine Coffin State Historic Site To expand programming aimed for new youth and adult audiences $5,000
Lincoln Middle/High School To purchase virtual reality headsets for individuals with disabilities $7,598
Neighborhood Health Center To expand the hours of coverage for the certified medical interpreter $10,920
Richmond Art Museum To purchase appropriate museum storage cabinets and archival boxes $4,983
Richmond Civic Theatre To support the renovation of the theatre's basement $7,810
Richmond Friends School To purchase new classroom furniture $1,590
Richmond Parks and Recreation To purchase an inflatable movie screen for family and community events $8,449
Richmond Symphony Orchestra To expand the community concert series $8,000
Sunrise, Inc. Therapeutic Riding Center To provide scholarships that enable local children to benefit from therapeutic riding services $5,000
Wayne County Food Council To support an orchard project and materials to engage students at Dennis Middle School $3,901
Wayne County Railroaders Association To provide funding for a handicap accessible ramp and viewing deck $5,000
Wayne County SWCD To support Conservation Days programming for local 3rd and 4th graders $3,000

Established in 1979, The Wayne County Foundation exists to foster and encourage private philanthropic giving, to enhance the spirit of community and to improve the quality of life in the Wayne County, Indiana, area now and for future generations.

Good News Habitat for Humanity - Faith Builds Event

Posted May 26, 2021

Supplied Flyer:  Good News Habitat / Thrivent Meeting Flyer

Join Good News Habitat and Thrivent for one of our June 2021 Kickoff Zoom meetings!

See the miracle of your ministry in action. Learn how you and your local Christian community can put your faith into action by partnering with Habitat for Humanity and Thrivent in a Faith Builds event. Faith Builds provides an opportunity to live out your faith by raising walls, funds and prayers to help families achieve strength, stability and self-reliance through affordable homeownership.

Hosted by:
Alan Stamper, Good News Habitat Executive Director; Courtney Brookins, Thrivent Engagement Leader

Upon registration we will send you a volunteer packet to your home. Email: Courtney.Brookins@Thrivent.com

We hope to see you there!

Please mark your calendar:

Garage Sale at Centerville Christian Church Will Raise Money for Youth Mission Trip to Kansas City

Posted May 25, 2021

Centerville Christian Church will again host a garage sale at the Centerville Christian Church Family Center, 106 East Main Street, Centerville during the National Road Yard Sale, June 2-5, 2021, from 8 am to 5 pm.

Proceeds will benefit the Youth Mission Trip to Kansas City, as well as the needs of church and community members.

All kinds of items will be for sale for all kinds of prices. Restrooms will be available.

IU East Faculty Awards for Teaching and Scholarly Work

Posted May 25, 2021

Indiana University East recognizes outstanding full-time and part-time faculty with awards.

Supplied Photo:  Lee Ann Adams
Lee Ann Adams

The awards honor faculty contributions toward excellence in teaching, innovative teaching, community engagement, student success, and research and creative work.

Full-Time Faculty Awards

Supplied Photo:  Kelly Blewett
Kelly Blewett

Lee Ann Adams, reading specialist for the School of Education and instructor for First-Year Seminar, received the Helen Lees Award for Excellence in Teaching. The award was established in 1991.

Professor Emeritus Lees passed away in 1992, but her spirit continues in this annual award to honor a full-time faculty member who has taught at least 10 semesters at IU East.

Adams received her Master in Education and Bachelor of Science in Education from Ohio University.

Her research and creative interests include helping beginning education majors develop and improve their college level reading and writing skills to promote their successful completion of the Teacher Education Program.

Supplied Photo:  Ange Cooksey
Ange Cooksey

Kelly Blewett, assistant professor of English, received the Horizon Research/Creative Activity Award. This award recognizes excellence in research and/or creative work by an untenured faculty member during some or all of their first four years at IU East.

Blewett received her Ph.D. in English and Comparative Literature from the University of Cincinnati. She received her Master of Arts in English from the University of Louisville and her Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy from Miami University of Ohio.

Supplied Photo: Daron Olson
Daron Olson

Her research interests include composition theory and pedagogy, teacher feedback and reading.

Supplied PHoto:  Macy Bennett
Macy Bennett

Ange Cooksey, director of the Honors Program and senior lecturer in humanities, received the Distinguished Service Award. This award recognizes distinguished and sustained (10 years or more) service - campus, community or professional, by a full-time faculty member above and beyond the standard expectations of any compensation or release time provided for the service.

Cooksey received her Master in Arts in English, her Master of Arts in Philosophy and her Bachelor of Science in Philosophy from Ball State University.

Her research interests include biomedical ethics, death and dying, and the scholarship of teaching and learning.

Daron Olson, associate professor of European and world history, received the Distinguished Research/Creative Activity Award. This award recognizes distinguished research and/or creative work by a full-time faculty member over a sustained period of time (10 years or more).

Supplied Photo: Feler Bose
Feler Bose

Olson received his M.A. in History from the University of North Dakota and graduated with his Ph.D. in Historical Studies from Southern Illinois University Carbondale.

Supplied Photo: Edwina Helton
Edwina Helton

His research interests include Modern Norway and Norwegian emigration to the United States. His theoretical focus includes transnationalism, nationalism, and identity.

The Trustees Award for Teaching Innovation recognizes accomplishment and innovation in teaching by faculty members (lecturer, clinical, tenure-track) at IU East. Up to seven awards are granted each academic year.

This year's recipients of the Trustees Award for Teaching Innovation are Macy Bennett, Feler Bose, Ange Cooksey (see bio above), Edwina Helton, Yu Kay Law and Tim Scales.

Bennett, lecturer in nursing, received her Master of Science in Nursing Education from Ball State University and her Bachelor of Science in Nursing from Wright State University.

Her research interests include evaluating the effect of the flipped classroom on critical thinking and clinical reasoning skills.

Bose, associate professor of finance and economics, received his Ph.D. in Economics and a Master of Science in Economics from George Mason University. He received a Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering from Georgia Institute of Technology and his Bachelor of Science in Chemistry and Engineering Physics from Hope College.

Bose's areas of practice are law and economics, political economy, economics of religion, and applied microeconomics.

Supplied Photo:  Yu Kay Law
Yu Kay Law

Helton, professor of English and director of Women's and Gender Studies program, received her Ph.D. in English from Miami University. She has a Master of Arts in English, a Bachelor of Arts in English, and a Graduate Certificate in Composition and Rhetoric from the University of Akron. She also holds a Bachelor of Science in Psychology from the University of Maryland.

Supplied Photo: Tim Scales
Tim Scales

Helton's research and creative activity interests include historiographical approaches to women's and gender studies, digital humanities and the arts, new literacy studies and language development, online teaching pedagogies and reading and composition theory.

Supplied Photo:  Tina Pugh
Tina Pugh

Law, associate professor of chemistry, received his Doctorate in Biophysics from Ohio State University where he was also a Graduate Fellow. He earned his Master of Arts and Master of Science in Natural Sciences from the University of Cambridge in Cambridge, United Kingdom.

His research interests include computational studies of the interplay between nuclear quantum effects, conformational distribution and the absorption of light of nucleic acids and other light-absorbing compounds, and the role of mathematical preparation on the success of students in general chemistry.

Scales, director of the Center for Entrepreneurship and the Center for Economic Education and senior lecturer, received his Master of Business Administration from Anderson University. He holds a Master of Science in Banking from the University of Wisconsin at Madison and a Bachelor of Science in Business from IU East.

His scholarly activities involve Business Opportunities for Self Starters (BOSS), BOSS International, marketing success, and technologies including 3D printing, Oculus, AIG smart research and HoloLens.

Part-Time Faculty Award

Tina Pugh is an adjunct instructor with the School of Nursing and Health Sciences. She received the Part-Time Instructor Excellence in Teaching Award. This award recognizes excellence in teaching by part-time faculty members.

Pugh received her Master of Science in Nursing from IU East. She also holds a Bachelor of Science in Psychology and an Associate of Science in Nursing degrees from IU East.

She teaches didactic, lab and clinicals for nursing students. Pugh is also the learning lab and simulation assistant.

Pro-Bono Commission is Ready to Tee-Off for Justice with Annual Golf Outing June 10th

Posted June 1, 2021

The Whitewater Valley Pro Bono Commission is a staple in the community helping families with non-criminal legal matters for those that qualify. Helping individuals & families through difficult situations does have a positive "ripple effect" of benefits throughout the Whitewater Valley. Our entire budget relies on grants and donations through different fundraising events such as our Annual Tee-Off for Justice Golf Outing happening June 10th.

Our golf outing is taking place at Forest Hills Country Club in Richmond, Indiana on Thursday June 10, 2021. The shot-gun start takes place at 1:00pm with lunch being provided for players. A single player is $75 and that includes lunch, cart, and greens fees. Sponsorships range from $500 to $50.

Please contact our Executive Director, Shane Edington, at shane1@whitewatervalleyprobono.org for more information or telephone at (765)983-7353. We hope to see you there!

Return of Medical Monday Will Focus On Walk-in Urgent Services for Orthopedic Patients

Posted June 1, 2021

Supplied Photos:  Dorothy Lollathin and Matthew RevennaughAfter a year off because of the COVID-19 pandemic, Reid Health's Medical Monday event will return this month.

Dorothy Lollathin, PA-C, and Matthew Revennaugh, PA-C, of Reid Health Orthopedics & Spine will present "Expanding Orthopedic Services with New Walk-in Availability."

Medical Monday will begin at 1 p.m. Monday, June 14, at Central United Methodist Church, 1425 E. Main St. in Richmond. To register, call Sharrie Harlin Davis at (765) 983-3000, ext. 4676.

Masks are required to attend.

Medical Monday is supported by Reid Health Community Benefit. Harlin-Davis started the event when she was working for the Minority Health Coalition and maintained it after joining Reid Health. The event has built a loyal following, averaging 40 to 50 guests each month to learn about various health issues and community programs.

Reid Health Breaks Ground on New Facility in Winchester

Posted May 24, 2021

Supplied Photo:  Ground was broken Monday on what will become the Reid Health Primary & Specialty Care - Winchester facility on Symmes Center Drive.
Ground was broken Monday on what will become the Reid Health Primary & Specialty Care - Winchester facility on Symmes Center Drive.

Reid Health is expanding its presence in Winchester, breaking ground Monday on what will be a 17,521-square-foot facility that will house a variety of services once it's finished.

The new Reid Health Primary & Specialty Care - Winchester location at 386 Symmes Center Drive on the southeast side of the city represents a $7.7 million investment by the health system.

Inside will be the primary care practice of Daniel Wegg, M.D., as well as space dedicated to specialties such as Orthopedics; Ear, Nose, and Throat; Audiology; Cardiology; OB/GYN; and more. X-ray and laboratory services also will be available on-site.

"Having those kinds of resources within our grasp within our own building will be just amazing for our patients," Dr. Wegg said. "Our other facilities in Randolph County are dated, so they don't necessarily satisfy all the modern medical needs that we have."

The project is expected to take about a year to complete. The 4-acre site will have 99 parking spaces and an additional 12 handicap spaces.

"Having those kinds of resources within our grasp within our own building will be just amazing for our patients." -- Daniel Wegg, M.D.

Among the specialties that will utilize space in the new building will be Reid's musculoskeletal urgent and rehab services.

"What's great about this new facility for the people of Winchester and surrounding areas is to have specialty care that is as good as the care they receive at our main Richmond office," said Joel McClurg, M.D., of Reid Health Orthopedics & Spine.

"We will have everything we need to take care of the entire spectrum of orthopedic care right in Winchester. We are excited to be there."

There are no current plans for the future use of the Randolph Medical Center building at 400 S. Oak St. once the new facility is up and running.

Supplied Photo: Reid Health President/CEO Craig Kinyon (right) speaks
Reid Health President/CEO Craig Kinyon (right) speaks with guests ahead of Monday's groundbreaking ceremony in Winchester.

Dr. Wegg has seen patients there since joining Reid about seven years ago, giving the health system its first physician in the community. Until then, Reid's primary care presence in Winchester had been limited to nurse practitioners.

Joining Dr. Wegg in the primary care practice are Jeff Baron, NP, and Cierra Fisher, NP.

"This new facility will provide Reid Health and Winchester, Randolph County, and its residents many opportunities," said Rohit Bawa, M.D., Chair of the Reid Health Physician Associates' Network Operations Council. "For patients who live in that area, having a local facility to have both primary care access and specialist access is important in that they won't have to travel to see those specialists.

"For Reid, it gives us opportunity to service an important secondary market and expand our presence in East Central Indiana."

"Having a high-quality, multi-service clinic such as this will dramatically help Reid Health fulfill its mission statement in the Winchester area -- to lead our communities to well-being, one person at a time." -- Tom Hilkert, Chairman of the Reid Health Governing Board

The expansion of services to Winchester and the greater Randolph County area is a reflection of Reid's recently adopted new mission, vision, and values statements.

"Having a high-quality, multi-service clinic such as this will dramatically help Reid Health fulfill its mission statement in the Winchester area -- to lead our communities to well-being, one person at a time," said Tom Hilkert, Chairman of the Reid Health Governing Board.

"We're thrilled to be adding to our service capabilities in the Winchester and Randolph County area," said Craig Kinyon, Reid Health President/CEO. "This new facility embodies our vision of healthier people, thriving communities, and being a trusted partner to those we serve."

IU East Student Excels in Sport of Bass Fishing

Posted May 24, 2021

Supplied Photo: IU East student Nate Pardo will compete at the Collegiate Championship on Lake Murray in South Carolina, May 26-27.
Nate Pardo of Richmond is part of the IU Bass Fishing Club. Pardo is a freshman at IU East and plans to major in nursing.

The allure of bass fishing is so strong for Indiana University East student Nate Pardo that he heads to a lake most days to practice or take part in competitions.

It's so strong that he has been known to park his truck, trailer and boat on campus so that he can make a faster getaway to places where his casts could help land him big fish and possibly a big-paying career.

"It would be nice to make a name for myself and go pro," admits the freshman who hopes to enter the nursing program at IU East. "I am going to have fun with it and go do it."

You will find him going and doing it every day that he doesn't attend classes -- and the lakes aren't frozen over. "I am always learning new things on the water," he said.

He practices about four times a week, as well as taking part in tournaments and attending Zoom meetings with teammates in the IU Bass Fishing Club.

One object of his constant practice is to earn the attention of sponsors in the multibillion dollar sports-fishing business -- and the graduate of Northeastern High School certainly has done that.

Pardo finished fourth out of 160 competing boats in the Bass Pro Shops Big Bass Bash Tournament that was held March 13-15 on Kentucky Lake. The event was part of the Collegiate Bass Fishing Series.

His top catch, weighing in at a personal-best 5.25 pounds for a largemouth bass, led the tournament for three sessions. Most importantly, the high finish qualified him for the collegiate championship event that is coming up in May.

Pardo started bass fishing when he was about age 3. "My grandma (Jeanie Lewis of Richmond) used to take me when she'd baby-sit in the summer."

He quickly grew to love the sport, which is far from the image of Andy Griffith and Opie leisurely fishing from a small rowboat.

Today, it's a fast-paced industry promoted by the likes of Bass Pro Shops, Berkley tackles, Engel Coolers and Garmin and Hydro-Wave electronics.

Supplied Photo:  Nate Pardo of Richmond is part of the IU Bass Fishing Club. Pardo is a freshman at IU East and plans to major in nursing.
Nate Pardo of Richmond is part of the IU Bass Fishing Club. Pardo is a freshman at IU East and plans to major in nursing.

Pardo's boat has a Triton 150-horsepower motor that can get him quickly around large lakes and into small coves. "That's a small motor," he notes with a laugh. "It's nothing to go 80 mph on the water now."

He will choose a fellow club member for a two-person boat that will compete at the Collegiate Championship that is scheduled May 26-27 on Lake Murray in South Carolina.

The IU Bass Fishing Club is made up of 40 students who represent multiple campuses.

They are serious about fishing -- and also serious about making sure the activity will be around forever. The club is "dedicated to the preservation and conservation of our land and water resources," reports information found on its website. "The IU Bass Fishing Club was the first college fishing team, established in 1987, and has since grown to be nationally recognized (by major organizations)."

Pardo said club members usually practice on their own and pair up for club tournaments.

They participate in "about three Zoom meetings a month," he said. "We usually hold club tournaments twice a month to fish together."

As if classes, homework and bass fishing weren't enough, Pardo is also working to open a food truck this summer that specializes in ribbon french fries (flat chips that are connected in spirals).

His parents, Don and Amy Pardo, are in the barbecue business.

Amy Pardo isn't into fishing, but the activity has a special meaning to Don and Nate.

"We always make a trip on Father's Day," Pardo said. "That's something we started a few years back ... whatever lake he wants to go to, let's go."

As long as the lakes haven't frozen over, Pardo will head out three to four times a week, often with high school buddies Austin Rhodus and Hunter Dixon.

"It's easy to blend it together," Pardo explains about school and fishing. "I am only at school Mondays and Wednesdays. I can fish every other day if my grades stay up."

So far, so good, in that regard.

He thoroughly enjoys attending IU East: "I love it. It's a great atmosphere."

Pardo plans to earn his Bachelor of Science in Nursing from the School of Nursing and Health Sciences and then keep furthering his graduate studies. "I kind of like the action in it and helping people in a time of need," he said about his aspirations in nursing.

Eventually, he wants to become a nurse practitioner who specializes in acute care (emergency) or family medicine.

Of course, he's willing to slow everything down to take bass fishing a step further.

His main emphasis this year is drawing the interest of sponsors. They are critical for professionals and collegiate clubs, too, because the universities don't cover any costs.

The IU Bass Fishing Club's sponsors include Trickstep, Seaguar, Mystery Tackle Box, Bass Boat Saver, GC Products, Blue Rock Custom Tackle, AFTCO, Secret Lures and United Real Estate.

It's estimated that 40 million people fish in the United States, more than play tennis and golf combined. The favorite fishing target is the largemouth bass.

Pardo's favorite is the smallmouth bass. He caught one weighing a personal-best 6 pounds in St. Clair, Michigan.

Ironically, nearby waterways don't harbor too many lunkers. "We don't have many big bass in Indiana," Pardo said. "Brookville Lake is the closest. It has its moments."

He said the Geist Reservoir in Fishers is a good place to catch bass.

The recent tournament catch was his largest for a largemouth bass.

Catch and release is mandatory in bass-fishing contests. That's okay with Pardo: "I have personally never eaten a bass."

He will catch and keep some crappie in the spring. He also likes to eat salmon and fish and chips. "That's as far as I go with eating fish."

LifeStream Services Seeks "Friendly Callers"

Posted May 17, 2021

LifeStream Services is seeking volunteers to make friendly calls to older adults who are experiencing feelings of loneliness and social isolation. The Friendly Caller program matches a volunteer with an older adult based on similar interest so the two may enjoy simple conversation over the phone.

Loneliness and social isolation in older adults is linked to a number of serious health conditions and an increased risk of developing dementia. These issues may be exacerbated during the pandemic. A simple conversation on the phone, can go a long way in improving the quality of life for older adults who are feeling lonely or simply need someone to talk to.

Friendly Caller volunteers must be at least 18 years of age or older and enjoy talking on the phone and having conversation. Those interested in volunteering as a Friendly Caller can sign up by filling out the volunteer application online at lifestreaminc.org/support/volunteer, or contact Laura Bray, Volunteer Services Administrator, at 765-759-3372 or lbray@lifestreaminc.org.

Reacting to Lower Demand, Reid Health Revises Hours at Kuhlman Vaccine Clinic

Posted May 17, 2021

Reid Health is adjusting the operating hours for its COVID-19 mass vaccination clinic as the health system reacts to a drop-off in scheduled appointments over the past several weeks.

From the beginning of the vaccine rollout in mid-December, Reid officials have worked to commit the level of resources needed to keep up with demand and get as many shots into arms as quickly as possible.

That demand peaked weeks ago and has seen a steady decline since, so Reid is shifting its plans for the Kuhlman Center Vaccine Clinic at the Wayne County Fairgrounds while remaining prepared should the need arise again for mass vaccinations.

"We want to rightsize our resource commitment to the current demand," said Thomas Huth, M.D., Vice President of Medical Affairs for Reid Health, "but we will be ready to increase our capacity again at a moment's notice."

Starting May 27, the Kuhlman Center location will be open Thursday mornings, Friday afternoons, and Saturday mornings instead of the current Monday-Saturday schedule for that location.

Reid will continue to distribute the vaccine at its Urgent Care facilities in Richmond and Connersville as well as at Reid Ready Care Clinic in the Richmond Meijer store.

"As much as we'd like for everyone to be vaccinated, we know that's not going to be a reality. But for those who remain on the fence about the shot, we're still here and we'd love to help you and your loved ones stay safe," said Craig Kinyon, Reid Health President/CEO.

Supplied Photo: Dr. David Jetmore (from left), Dr. Jennifer Bales, Dr. Annuradha Bhandari, and Dr. Thomas Huth were the first to receive the vaccine at Reid Health.
Dr. David Jetmore (from left), Dr. Jennifer Bales, Dr. Annuradha Bhandari, and Dr. Thomas Huth were the first to receive the vaccine at Reid Health.

Five months ago, Reid officials began administering the COVID-19 vaccine as part of a statewide program overseen by the Indiana Department of Health. On that Thursday night, four Reid doctors became the first people in Wayne County to receive the shot.

In the time that followed, vaccine demand increased as the IDOH gradually expanded eligibility guidelines, and Reid Health reacted accordingly.

Clinics at the Medical Office Building on the main hospital campus and at Reid practices in Lynn and Connersville were consolidated into a single larger location at the Kuhlman Center as the vaccine was offered to the general public for the first time in mid-January.

It took five weeks to reach the first 5,000 doses administered as state guidelines limited eligibility to frontline healthcare workers and first responders.

But the pace at which milestones were met accelerated once access was opened to the public. It took only 15 days to go from 5,000 to 10,000 doses given out and another 12 days to reach 15,000 as the age of eligibility steadily dropped to 65 and older.

As younger groups became eligible, a new trend took shape. With each announcement of another drop in the age requirement, the size of the surge in new appointments declined.

Supplied Photo:  Catherine Cates (left) receives the COVID-19 vaccine at Reid Health's clinic in Brookville, Ind.
Catherine Cates (left) receives the COVID-19 vaccine at Reid Health's clinic in Brookville, Ind.

As first-shot appointments at the Kuhlman Center have decreased, Reid officials have tried other ways to make the vaccine more accessible. They opened a vaccine clinic in Franklin County and special clinics were stood up for staff and students at Indiana University East, Ivy Tech Community College Richmond, Earlham College, and Bethany Theological Seminary as well as for staff and patients at Richmond State Hospital.

Last month -- with the blessing of the IDOH -- Reid expanded to giving out vaccinations at the Richmond and Connersville Urgent Cares and the Ready Care clinic at Meijer and began welcoming walk-ins at all locations. The health system's leaders continue to look at options for branching out to other practices as well.

"We want to make it as easy as possible for everyone to get vaccinated," Huth said, "but storage requirements for the vaccine create challenges that we're actively working through."

Free vaccinations at the Richmond (1501 Chester Blvd.) and Connersville (1475 E. State Road 44) Urgent Cares are available from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday-Sunday. The Ready Care Clinic at Meijer is open for shots 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday-Friday and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

The Kuhlman Center site will temporarily shut down starting Saturday, June 12 to make way for the Wayne County 4-H Fair. Operations at the site will resume after the Fourth of July holiday on Thursday, July 8. During this time, scheduled and walk-in vaccinations still will be available at Reid's other sites.

There is no office fee or copay for vaccination-only visits at any Reid locations.

"As much as we'd like for everyone to be vaccinated, we know that's not going to be a reality. But for those who remain on the fence about the shot, we're still here and we'd love to help you and your loved ones stay safe." -- Craig Kinyon, Reid Health President/CEO

Appointments can be scheduled through the state website, ourshot.in.gov, using either the Firefox or Chrome web browser. To make it easier for Hoosiers to get vaccinated, the IDOH recently began to have all sites accept walk-ins as well.

After an appointment has been made, a link will be sent to complete the registration. That information doesn't have to be filled out before arriving for the scheduled vaccination but doing so ahead of time will speed up the process.

The IDOH has designated 211 as a call line for assistance.

Everyone 12 and older is eligible to be vaccinated in Indiana, but only the Pfizer vaccine has been approved by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration for those younger than 18. Reid's sites use the Pfizer product.

Parents or legal guardians of minor children who will be vaccinated need to be present at the child's appointment.

Reid Health Vaccination Timeline

  • Dec. 17: Wayne County's first vaccinations are given to four doctors at the Medical Office Building on the main Reid campus. The following week, Reid opens two other clinics, one in Lynn and one in Connersville.
  • Jan. 19: Richmond operations move to the Kuhlman Center shortly after the first members of the general public (those 80 and older) become eligible for the vaccine. Operations in Lynn and Connersville begin to wind down with only second-shot appointments available. The 5,000th vaccine dose is given.
Supplied Photo:  Bob Anthony (right) was the first person to get a COVID-19 vaccination at Reid Health's Greenville, Ohio, facility in a partnership with other local health organizations.
Bob Anthony (right) was the first person to get a COVID-19 vaccination at Reid Health's Greenville, Ohio, facility in a partnership with other local health organizations.
  • Jan. 21: Clinic opens at Reid's Greenville, Ohio, facility as part of a partnership with the Darke County General Health District, Family Health, and Wayne HealthCare.
  • Feb. 3: The 10,000th dose is given.
  • Feb. 15: Vaccine operations are fully consolidated at the Kuhlman Center as the Lynn and Connersville clinics close. The 15,000th dose is given.
  • March 2: The 20,000th dose is given.
  • March 18: The 25,000th dose is given.
  • March 30: Clinic at the American Legion facility in Brookville, Ind., opens for a six-week run with first shots given over the initial three weeks and second shots scheduled for the last three weeks.
  • March 31: The 30,000th dose is given.
  • April 8: Another expansion comes with special clinics stood up for IU East, Ivy Tech, Earlham, Bethany, and Richmond State Hospital.
  • April 16: The 35,000th dose is given.
  • April 19: Richmond and Connersville Urgent Cares begin administering shots.
  • April 30: Walk-ins welcomed at the Kuhlman Center.
  • May 3: Reid Ready Care in Meijer starts giving the vaccine.
  • May 12: Reid partners with White's Farm Flea Market and Auctioneers for a special one-time clinic at the popular Brookville flea market. The 40,000th dose is given.
  • May 27: Kuhlman Center Vaccine Clinic will move from a six-day-a-week schedule to being open three days, including Thursday mornings, Friday afternoons, and Saturday mornings.
  • June 12-July 7: Operations at the Kuhlman Center will pause to make way for the Wayne County 4-H Fair.
  • July 8: Vaccinations will resume at the Kuhlman Center.

Reid Gives Out 40,000th COVID-19 Vaccine Dose as Eligibility Opens to Ages 12-15

Posted May 11, 2021

Two COVID-19 vaccine milestones were reached this week as Reid Health gave out its 40,000th dose and the Indiana Department of Health opened eligibility to children ages 12-15.

Everyone 12 and older now can be vaccinated in Indiana, but only the Pfizer vaccine has been approved by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration for those younger than 18. Reid's sites use the Pfizer product.

"This is another important step on the path back to normalcy," said Thomas Huth, M.D., Vice President of Medical Affairs for Reid Health. "We hope everyone who is eligible to get the vaccine will take advantage of the opportunity, not only for their own sake but for the health of all those around them."

Reid administered its 40,000th dose Wednesday, reaching the milestone five months after vaccinations began in mid-December. The health system has been working recently to expand the number of locations where shots are available.

The Kuhlman Center Vaccine Clinic at the Wayne County Fairgrounds is open 7 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday.

Free vaccinations also can be had at Reid's Richmond (1501 Chester Blvd.) and Connersville (1475 E. State Road 44) Urgent Cares. Hours at those locations are 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday-Sunday.

The Reid Ready Care Clinic at Meijer is open for shots 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday-Friday and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

There is no office fee or copay for vaccination-only visits at any Reid locations.

"This is another important step on the path back to normalcy. We hope everyone who is eligible to get the vaccine will take advantage of the opportunity, not only for their own sake but for the health of all those around them." -- Thomas Huth, M.D., Vice President of Medical Affairs

Appointments can be scheduled through the state website, ourshot.in.gov, using either the Firefox or Chrome web browser. To make it easier for Hoosiers to get vaccinated, the Indiana Department of Health recently began to have all sites accept walk-ins as well.

Parents or legal guardians of minor children who will be vaccinated need to be present at the child's appointment.

After a visit has been scheduled, a link will be sent to complete the registration. That information doesn't have to be filled out before arriving for the appointment but doing so ahead of time will speed up the process.

The IDOH has designated 211 as a call line for assistance.

Reid has been made a host site by the state with responsibility for helping to vaccinate Wayne, Randolph, Union, and Fayette counties.

County health departments in those areas also are offering vaccinations through their own clinics. In Wayne County, the health department is using the former Elder-Beerman building in downtown Richmond, 601 E. Main St. Hours there are 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday.

State Parks to Celebrate Kids to Parks Day on May 15

Posted May 11, 2021

Indiana State Park properties are hosting special events on May 15 for Kids to Parks Day (KTP Day), a national day of outdoor play designed to connect kids and families with local, state, and national parks.

Gov. Eric Holcomb also declared May 15 as Kids to Parks Day in Indiana and signed an official proclamation that acknowledges the important initiative to "encourage kids and empower families to get outdoors and visit America's parks".

The day is a chance for children to learn about park stewardship, outdoor recreation, and natural and cultural history. It also helps foster appreciation for public lands in the next generation.

There are many opportunities to engage children in KTP Day:

  • Find planned events and special activities related to KTP Day at IN.gov/state-parks/programs/program-schedules.
  • Check out the Children's Outdoor Bill of Rights with 11 suggested outdoor activities every kid should do. Complete all 11 to become a Hoosier Outdoor Child. See dnr.IN.gov.
  • Get started on Hoosier Quest to earn patches and pins at IN.gov/hoosierquest.
  • Check out IN.gov/kids for more ideas.
  • Share your photos on social media with the hashtag #KidstoParks. You can post them directly to the Indiana State Parks Facebook page at Facebook.com/INdnrstateparksandreservoirs.

KTP Day is sponsored by the National Park Trust and supported by America's State Parks and the National Association of State Park Directors.

For more information on the national day, see parktrust.org/kids-to-parks-day.

To view more DNR news releases, please see dnr.IN.gov.

Stay Informed

Motorists in East Central Indiana can monitor road closures, road conditions, and traffic alerts any time via:

Enjoy Indiana Waters on Free Fishing Weekend, June 5-6

Posted June 1, 2021

Supplied Photo:  FishingIndiana residents can fish the state's public waters without a fishing license or a trout/salmon stamp on Saturday, June 5 and Sunday, June 6.

The two Free Fishing Days kick off National Fishing and Boating Week, June 5-13, a national celebration that highlights the importance of recreational fishing and boating. Those activities are excellent opportunities to get outside and connect with family and friends, and spending time outdoors is also good for your health.

June is an especially good time to fish for largemouth bass, sunfish, catfish, and Skamania steelhead. Fishing tips and videos can be found at on IN.gov/learn2fish.

Some urban parks will be stocked this week with catchable-size channel catfish; see wildlife.IN.gov/fishing/urban-fishing for locations. For public fishing areas and access sites statewide, explore the Where to Fish map at on.IN.gov/where2fish. Indiana is also home to several water trails across the state that provide opportunities to fish while you paddle; see on.IN.gov/watertrails for more information.

To learn more about Free Fishing Weekend events, visit on.IN.gov/fishfree. This year's last Free Fishing Day will be Sept. 25.

To view more DNR news releases, please see dnr.IN.gov.

Class of 2021 by the Numbers

Posted May 10, 2021

Supplied Graphic: 2021 Graduates Infographic

The Class of 2021 will receive 811 diplomas during Indiana University East's Commencement Ceremony on Friday, May 14. This year's on-campus ceremony is at 10 a.m. and will be held in front of Whitewater Hall.

Of the degrees being conferred, 773 are bachelor's degrees and 38 are master's degrees.

Commencement attendance will be limited to graduates only. Family and friends may join the celebration via live stream available on the IU East Commencement website.

Graduates and their families are invited to share their their cap and gown photos and unique celebrations with IU East on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram using the hashtags #IUEgrad, #iueast and #PackStrong.

Members of the Class of 2021 can get details on how to participate in the Graduation Celebration at iue.edu/commencement.

The Class of 2021 has several characteristics.

Of the total number of graduates, there are 64 Indiana counties represented, 35 states and 20 countries.

A brief glance at the statistics and figures provides a look at the graduates joining more than 10,000 IU East alumni.

  • Indiana Resident: 564
  • Non-Resident: 235
  • Reciprocity residents: 73
  • Male: 260
  • Female: 539
  • Minorities represented: 12.6 percent
  • The oldest student graduating is 65, the youngest is 19.
  • The most numerous degree to be granted is the B.S. in Business Administration (205).
  • The second most frequent degree to be granted is the B.S. in Psychology (122).
  • First generation students: 35.3 percent.

If sorting graduates by age, those who are 23 and younger compose 25.5 percent of the Class of 2021.Graduates ages 23-29 represent 35.7 percent of the class while those 30 and over compose 38.8 percent. Within the Class of 2021, 46 undergraduate students earned a 4.0 GPA.

For more information, visit iue.edu/commencement.

4-H Queen Contest - May 16th Last Day to Apply

Posted May 10, 2021

Supplied Logo: 4-H Queen CloverSunday, May 16th is the last day to submit an application to participate in the 2021 Wayne County 4-H Queen Contest.

Applications are available here:
http://waynecounty4hfairqueen.com/application-queen-4

Reid Health Partners With Loveyourbrain Foundation on Yoga Program for Traumatic Brain Injuries

Posted May 10, 2021

A new yoga program for those healing from traumatic brain injuries (TBI) is coming to Reid Health thanks to a partnership with the LoveYourBrain Foundation.

Reid recently became the second health system in Indiana to join the foundation's network of clinical affiliates. This month, Reid will launch the first class for the six-week program.

"Yoga has been shown to improve rehab outcomes in stroke populations, and more recent studies have shown similar benefits in TBI populations, specifically improvements in strength, balance, flexibility, and attention control," said Jordan Raynor, M.D., Reid neurologist and Stroke Medical Director.

"TBI patients also have reported a greater sense of belonging and ability to move forward with their lives after participating in a structured yoga program. Patients often find yoga helpful in reframing their TBI experience, which allows them to focus on what is possible for them moving forward instead of constantly reflecting on what they have lost."

LoveYourBrain believes in the holistic and dynamic nature of yoga to meet the individual needs of those with brain injuries, from wanting to rebuild strength and balance to managing stress and finding comfort in a community of people with shared experiences.

Upon completion of the free six-week program, participants can sign up for a follow-up TBI-friendly yoga class, which will cost $8 per session. That class will begin this summer.

"This is a great program," said Matthew Wright, Medical Fitness Manager and Balance and Fall Prevention Specialist for Reid Health. "There really aren't many like it available that are focused toward the TBI population."

"Yoga has been shown to improve rehab outcomes in stroke populations, and more recent studies have shown similar benefits in TBI populations, specifically improvements in strength, balance, flexibility, and attention control." -- Jordan Raynor, M.D., Reid neurologist and Stroke Medical Director

Patients with brain injuries typically require a multidisciplinary approach to rehab, according to Dr. Raynor. Support often is needed from different specialties including neurology, neurosurgery, neuropsychology, psychiatry, physical medication rehabilitation, endocrinology, ophthalmology, occupational therapy, physical therapy, speech therapy, and vocational therapy.

"Alternative treatment options such as yoga are an expansion of the traditional multidisciplinary approach to TBI management," he said. "Yoga helps improve balance, conditioning, and core strength in ways where traditional rehab therapies are limited."

Those with questions about the LoveYourBrain program or who would like to sign up for a class can contact Wright at (765) 983-3092. Participants also can be referred by their neurologist.

The LoveYourBrain Foundation is a non-profit organization that improves the quality of life of people affected by traumatic brain injury and raises awareness about the importance of brain health. The organization has partnered with more than 60 hospitals and community yoga studios across the U.S. and Canada.

IU East to Present Honorary Degree to Jack Everly

Posted May 7, 2021

Indiana University East will present an Indiana University Honorary Doctor of Music to Richmond native Jack Everly during its Commencement Ceremony on Friday, May 14.

Supplied Photo: Jack Everly
Jack Everly will receive an IU Honorary Doctor of Music during IU East's Commencement Ceremony on May 14. Everly is a native of Richmond, Indiana, and currently resides in Indianapolis.

Indiana University President Michael A. McRobbie will confer the honorary degree during commencement, available to watch live stream. The honorary Doctor of Music recognizes individuals for outstanding achievement to the arts and humanities.

The honorary degree, the highest academic recognition Indiana University can bestow, is awarded to individuals who demonstrate the highest standards of personal integrity and sincere concern for the public good. In addition, candidates for the honorary degree generally have significant ties to the state of Indiana or to Indiana University. Through this high honor, IU seeks to recognize individuals who may serve as role models for students, faculty, alumni and the people of the state of Indiana.

"It is an honor to recognize Maestro Everly's lifelong passion for the arts and to present him with an honorary degree," said IU East Chancellor Kathy Girten. "Jack's contributions to music extend beyond Broadway, movies and television performances.Through his innovative work he has introduced millions of people to new genres of music and live orchestra performances. His outstanding reputation attracts people to performances - held in Indiana as well as nationally - making him a key contributor to our state's quality of life and economic vitality."

Everly currently lives in Indianapolis.

He is the Principal Pops Conductor of the Indianapolis and Baltimore Symphony Orchestras, Naples Philharmonic Orchestra (Florida) and the National Arts Centre Orchestra (Ottawa). He has conducted the Los Angeles Philharmonic at the Hollywood Bowl, The New York Pops at Carnegie Hall, the San Francisco Symphony and numerous appearances with The Cleveland Orchestra at Blossom Music Center. Maestro Everly annually conducts more than 90 performances in cities across North America.

Celebrating his 11th anniversary as Music Director of the National Memorial Day Concert and A Capitol Fourth on PBS, Maestro Everly proudly leads the National Symphony Orchestra in these patriotic celebrations on the West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol. These concerts attract hundreds of thousands attendees on the lawn and the broadcasts reach millions of viewers and are some of the very highest rated programming on PBS television.

Everly is the also Music Director of the IPL Yuletide Celebration, which will celebrate its 35th Anniversary this coming holiday season. He led the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra in its first Pops recording, Yuletide Celebration, Volume One, that included three of his own orchestrations. Some of his other recordings include In The Presence featuring the Czech Philharmonic and Daniel Rodriguez, Sandi Patty's Broadway Stories, the soundtrack to Disney's The Hunchback of Notre Dame, and Everything's Coming Up Roses: The Complete Overtures Of Jule Styne.

Originally appointed by Mikhail Baryshnikov, Everly was conductor of the American Ballet Theatre for 14 years, where he served as music director. In addition to his ABT tenure, he teamed with Marvin Hamlisch on Broadway shows that Hamlisch scored. He conducted Carol Channing hundreds of times in Hello, Dolly! in two separate Broadway productions.

Maestro Everly is a 1970 graduate of Richmond High School and is recognized as a RHS Distinguished Alumni. Everly attended Indiana University where he graduated from the Jacobs School of Music in 1974. Since then, he has devoted his life to the performing arts and has worked as a conductor, arranger, composer, music director and broadcast recording artist.

For more information on the IU East Commencement Ceremony, visit iue.edu/commencement.

Local Organizations Host Monthly Memory Cafés

Posted May 7, 2021

Paint the Towne and the YMCA of Richmond, in partnership with Dementia Friends Indiana and LifeStream Services, host monthly Memory Cafés in Richmond. Memory Cafés are a welcoming and safe place for people living with dementia and their caregivers to enjoy activities at little to no cost and break from their normal routine.

Paint the Towne offers a fun and relaxing space to create works of art on the first Wednesday of every month from 11:00am to noon at their location at 411 N. 8th St. Richmond, IN 47374. Some activities may require a donation to cover the cost of supplies.

The YMCA of Richmond offers health and wellness education and a place to enjoy light exercise and activities on the second Friday of the month at their location at 1215 S. J St. Richmond, IN 47374. Membership is not required.

There are more than 700 Memory Cafes in the United States. Paint the Towne and YMCA of Richmond are the first two locations offered in the Richmond area. Beyond creating a safe place for people with dementia and their caregivers, Memory Cafés provide an opportunity to socialize and connect with people in a similar situation.

LifeStream is East Central Indiana's Dementia Friends Administrator. Those who are interested in learning more or becoming a Dementia Friend can attend the Dementia Friends Information Session held on the second Tuesday of the month from 1:00pm to 2:00pm via Zoom. Join the session by visiting bit.ly/LifeStreamDF21 (Meeting ID: 840 4568 1832, Passcode: 717309).

Learn more or become a Dementia Friend online by visiting lifestreaminc.org/dementiafriends or contact Beth Evans, Director of Community Services, at bevans@lifestreaminc.org or 765-405-3001.

Dementia Friends Indiana initiative is an outreach of Dementia Friendly America. The initiative seeks to educate communities about dementia, break down the stigma surrounding dementia, and implement practical changes that make life easier to navigate for those with dementia and for their loved ones.

Reid taking COVID-19 Vaccines to White's Farm Flea Market in Brookville

Posted May 6, 2021

Reid Health is partnering with the Franklin County Health Department and White's Farm Flea Market and Auctioneers to offer a special COVID-19 vaccination clinic.

Up to 300 vaccines will be available at the popular flea market at White's Farm, 6028 Holland Road in Brookville, Ind., during the market's hours of 7-11 a.m. on Wednesday, May 12. Second doses then will be given during the Wednesday, June 2 market.

"I think it's vital for local businesses to play a role in the vaccination effort," said Jonathan White, Vice President of White's Farm and staff pharmacist at George's Pharmacy in Brookville. "I think we all have very short memories regarding what life was like this time last year.

"I don't want to have to close my business again because of safety concerns, and I certainly never want to have to open the newspaper and read about people I care about passing away from a virus whose spread we now have the ability to stop." -- Jonathan White, Vice President of White's Farm

"I don't want to have to close my business again because of safety concerns, and I certainly never want to have to open the newspaper and read about people I care about passing away from a virus whose spread we now have the ability to stop."

Appointments can be scheduled through the state website, ourshot.in.gov, using either the Firefox or Chrome web browser, but walk-ins will be welcome as well.

"To bring an end to the pandemic, we need to get as many shots in arms as we can," said Thomas Huth, M.D., Vice President of Medical Affairs for Reid Health. "This unique event allows us to bring the vaccine directly to members of the community rather than them having to make a special trip to come to us."

Everyone 16 and older is eligible to be vaccinated, but only the Pfizer vaccine has been approved by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration for those ages 16-17. Reid will be using the Pfizer product during this special event.

Parents or legal guardians of minor children who will be vaccinated need to be present at the child's appointment.

State's Message to Hoosiers: File Your FAFSA by May 15

Posted May 6, 2021

Hoosiers who haven't yet filed the most important form for receiving student financial aid have just a few days left to file before Indiana's new deadline of May 15.

The Indiana Commission for Higher Education extended the filing deadline for the 2021-2022 Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) beyond the state's original April 15 deadline to help as many students as possible file the FAFSA. Students who have not yet filed should submit the form at FAFSA.gov as soon as possible.

While the state's overall FAFSA filing numbers are down slightly from this time last year, students in the class of 2021 and low-income students in that class are farther behind. The rate of FAFSA filings for the class of 2021 is down 5.6 percent compared to this point last year.

Filing the FAFSA is one of the most important steps in the college-going process and can help students and families better afford college and other higher education opportunities. Both first-time and returning students must have a current FAFSA on file to qualify for state and federal financial aid and many merit-based scholarships also require a completed FAFSA.

"Even if you aren't sure of your plans after high school, having a current FAFSA on file can provide access to financial aid opportunities you may not realize you qualify for," said Indiana Commissioner for Higher Education Teresa Lubbers. "Indiana is committed to making higher education as affordable for students as possible by providing over $350 million in need-based aid annually. Hoosiers must take that first step of filing the FAFSA to qualify."

Students who file before the new May 15 deadline can be eligible for the state's financial aid programs, including the 21st Century Scholarship and the Frank O'Bannon Grant. (There is no FAFSA deadline for Hoosiers applying for the Next Level Jobs Workforce Ready Grant.)

File the FAFSA at FAFSA.gov. Learn how to create a Federal Student Aid ID here and visit LearnMoreIndiana.org for more resources, including the information needed to file. Students and families can always get FAFSA help by calling INvestEd at 317-715-9007.

Armed Forces Day Parade

Posted May 5, 2021

Saturday, May 15, 2021, 6:00 to 7:00 pm, Crown Creek Boulevard in Centerville, Indiana

Centerville's annual parade to recognize veterans will be held on Armed Forces Day this year, Saturday, May 15. This year's parade will be in reverse. For those not familiar with this Covid concept, the veterans will be stationary, positioned six feet apart along the side of the road. Some will be seated in military vehicles. The parade audience will drive or walk by. The veterans will be in position by 5:45 PM and the audience may pass by from 6 to 7 PM. All veterans and attendees will receive free Ullery's ice cream.

Logo: Centerville Loves Our VeteransThe parade route is Crown Creek Boulevard, the road adjoining Maplewood Park in Centerville. Veterans are asked to enter the parade route from the west end, at Morton Street. The audience is asked to enter from the east end, at Eliason Road.

The parade grand marshall will be Frank Crowe, age 98, Centerville resident, and veteran of the Pacific Theater in WWII. He will be escorted in a WWII jeep owned by Ron Hill.

All area veterans are invited, whether their service was in peace time or conflict. Vietnam-era veterans will be especially recognized as a representative of the Welcome Home Vietnam Veterans organization in Indianapolis will be on hand to give each of them a gift.

To make the event even more special for veterans, the audience is invited to festoon their car, their bike, or themselves with patriotic decorations.

The Centerville veterans parade was first held in 2017, the brainchild of a small committee including Marine Kris Turner and Air Force veteran Dan Wandersee. Adopting the name C-LOV (Centerville Loves Our Veterans), the committee now works under the auspices of Main Street Centerville, Inc. All C-LOV events are for any area veterans, not just Centerville residents.

Sponsors of this year's parade are A&Z Engineering, Indiana Municipal Power Agency, Kenna Consulting, Lochmueller Group, and Warm Glow Candle Company

Cardboard Recycling Program Coming to City of Richmond in Fall 2021

Posted May 3, 2021

The City of Richmond Sanitary District (RSD) has been awarded monies to pilot a curbside cardboard recycling program for residents of the City of Richmond.

Curbside cardboard recycling requires:

  • Distribution of separate specialized (96 gal) recycling container
  • Automated trash truck purchase
  • The development of route(s) to collect cardboard for recycling
  • 2,000 containers available for 2021

Participating residents MUST break down brown corrugated cardboard boxes to no larger than 22" X 22" X 36" to easily slide in/out of containers Please remove all packing materials; Styrofoam to green Rosie Roller; Plastic film/bags to stores that recycle plastic grocery bags (Needlers, Meijer, Kroger, Walmart)

Please complete a few questions so RSD can determine your level of interest of curbside cardboard collection and needs as we plan pick up routes.

The survey is located at: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/NBG72K2

No access to Internet??

Please call Deborah Tevis at 765 983-7456 to sign up!

Supplied Flyer:  Cardboard Recycling - Fall 2021

LifeStream Celebrates Older Americans Month with "Do Something Nice Today" Campaign

Posted May 3, 2021

LifeStream Services invites the community to "Do Something Nice Today" in celebration of Older Americans Month (OAM) during the month of May. The Administration for Community Living set this year's OAM theme as "Communities of Strength" to recognize the important role older adults play in fostering the connection and engagement that build strong, resilient communities.

This last year has been difficult for most Americans, but older Americans have often felt the loneliest as they have spent the year away from friends and family. To foster cheer and a sense of community, LifeStream Services will celebrate OAM by encouraging community members to do something nice for these elder pillars of the community and then share their experiences on LifeStream Services' Facebook and Instagram social media pages. Strength in a community is built and shown not only by bold acts, but also small ones of day-to-day life — sharing a conversation, working in the garden, delivering a meal, or giving a potted plant. And when the community shares these activities with others—even virtually or by telling about the experience later—not only is community strengthened, but it helps seniors build resilience too.

To coincide with Older Americans Month, spring coloring cards will be available for children or adults to color for later delivery to seniors who receive home delivered meals. Cards will be available for pick up during two drive-through events at LifeStream Services' office at 1701 Pilgrim Blvd., Yorktown, IN 47396 on Monday, May 10 from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. and Thursday, May 13 from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. Cards are also available to print on the LifeStream website. Finished cards can be returned by mail or placed in the drop box outside of the office. Deadline for their return is May 20. Learn more about Older Americans Month and what we are doing to celebrate at lifestreaminc.org/older-americans-month.

LifeStream Services also offers several additional community volunteer opportunities to give back to seniors, including the Friendly Caller Program or creating handmade holiday crafts for homebound seniors. The Friendly Caller Program uses contactless communication by telephone to bring together volunteers and isolated older adults to enjoy conversation and ease feelings of loneliness. Contact Laura Bray, Volunteer Services Administrator, at 765-759-3372 or lbray@lifestreaminc.org for more information or to get involved.

Walk-ins Now Welcome at Kuhlman Center Vaccine Clinic

Posted May 3, 2021

Reid Health is now taking walk-ins at the health system's community COVID-19 vaccination clinic at the Wayne County Fairgrounds.

The Kuhlman Center Vaccine Clinic is open 7 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday.

If you would like to schedule an appointment, that still can be done through the state website, ourshot.in.gov, using either the Firefox or Chrome web browser. If you need help getting an appointment, you can register directly with the Kuhlman Center clinic by calling (765) 935-8484 during regular operating hours.

"The Indiana Department of Health has urged health systems giving vaccinations to open up to walk-ins, and we're happy to do so," said Thomas Huth, M.D., Vice President of Medical Affairs for Reid Health. "We want to make it as easy as possible for everyone to get vaccinated."

Free vaccinations also currently are available through appointments at Reid's Urgent Care sites in Richmond (1501 Chester Blvd.) and Connersville (1475 E. State Road 44). The Reid Ready Care Clinic inside the Richmond Meijer store will begin giving shots Monday.

Vaccinations at the Urgent Cares are available from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday-Sunday. The Ready Care Clinic will be open for shots 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday-Friday and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

There is no office fee or copay for vaccination-only visits at any of Reid's locations.

"The Indiana Department of Health has urged health systems giving vaccinations to open up to walk-ins, and we're happy to do so. We want to make it as easy as possible for everyone to get vaccinated." -- Thomas Huth, M.D., Vice President of Medical Affairs

After an appointment has been made, a link will be sent to complete the registration. That information doesn't have to be filled out before arriving for a scheduled vaccination but doing so ahead of time will speed up the process.

Registration is preferred at the Urgent Care and Ready Care sites, but walk-ins are accepted.

Everyone 16 and older is eligible to be vaccinated in Indiana, but only the Pfizer vaccine has been approved by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration for those ages 16-17. Reid's sites use the Pfizer product.

Parents or legal guardians of minor children who will be vaccinated need to be present at the child's appointment.

IU President-elect Pamela Whitten visits IU East

Posted May 3, 2021

IU President-elect Pamela Whitten toured IU East with Chancellor Kathy Girten, student Zachery Honeycutt, and administrators on April 27.
IU President-elect Pamela Whitten toured IU East with Chancellor Kathy Girten, student Zachery Honeycutt, and administrators on April 27.
Supplied Photo:  IU President-elect Pamela Whitten listens as IU East student Zachery Honeycutt shares about the academic programs and resources available in Hayes Hall. Honeycutt is an Admissions Ambassador for the Office of Admissions.
IU President-elect Pamela Whitten listens as IU East student Zachery Honeycutt shares about the academic programs and resources available in Hayes Hall. Honeycutt is an Admissions Ambassador for the Office of Admissions.
Supplied Photo:  IU President-elect Pamela Whitten met with IU East Student Government Association members while she visited campus on Tuesday.
IU President-elect Pamela Whitten met with IU East Student Government Association members while she visited campus on Tuesday.

Indiana University President-elect Pamela Whitten toured the IU East campus on Tuesday, meeting with faculty, staff, local media and community members.

Whitten was named the 19th IU President on April 16 by the IU Board of Trustees. The visit to Richmond is one of five stops at IU Regional campuses this week. Whitten will take the helm on July 1, 2021.

IU East Chancellor Kathy Girten welcomed Whitten to the Richmond campus.

"We are honored to welcome President-elect Whitten to IU East and the community," Girten said. "She is very interested in the campus and all that we have to offer our students and the community. We look forward to working with President-elect Whitten as IU East continues to move toward fall 2021 and beyond."

While at IU East, Whitten was given a tour of the facilities and grounds by Admissions Ambassador Zachery Honeycutt, a senior biochemistry major. Honeycutt - who plans to one day be a dentist - shared his IU East experience with President-elect Whitten and his future plans to attend the IU School of Dentistry.

"IU East really is like a family," he said. "I've really enjoyed my time here."

President-elect Whitten had an opportunity to meet with other students as well, including the Student Government Association.

Andrea Hernández, SGA president, will graduate this May with a degree in human life science and minors in psychology, neuroscience and chemistry. She plans to attend medical school. "I am extremely excited for the impact President-elect Whitten will have on IU as a whole," Hernández said.

Hernández said she appreciated the opportunity to talk with Whitten.

"Talking to her today I noticed she cares a lot about our IU community and has the students' best interests at heart. Since we are a regional campus, I look forward to seeing her involvement with us, keeping us all connected as we are all one IU family regardless of what campus we come from," Hernández said. "I know President-elect Whitten will have a very positive impact on the regional campuses and the IU community. I was honored to have the privilege to meet her today and I cannot wait to see all that is accomplished during her presidential term."

Alex Hakes, SGA vice president, is a junior double-major in political science and Spanish.

"I was so honored to meet President-elect Whitten today. I have a feeling that her expertise and strategy for the IU community will benefit us greatly," Hakes said. "Under Chancellor Girten and President-elect Whitten, the opportunities for growth as a campus will be limitless."

Whitten, a visionary scholar and accomplished educator and researcher, will be the first female president for IU. She will oversee one of the nation's leading research universities at a time of record-level research funding and philanthropic support.She is currently the president of Kennesaw State University.

Whitten holds a Ph.D. in communication studies from the University of Kansas, a Master of Arts in communication from the University of Kentucky and a Bachelor of Science in management from Tulane University. She is an internationally recognized expert in the field of telemedicine. As part of her work in higher education, she additionally held leadership roles at University of Georgia and the University of Kansas Medical Center.

For more information on President-elect Whitten, visit iu.edu/about/leadership/incoming-president/index.html.

Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County Name Deserae Rivas as 2021 Jack Reed Memorial Scholarship Winner

Posted May 3, 2021

Supplied Photo: Deserae Rivas and BGCWC Board Member, Cherie Dolehanty
Deserae Rivas and BGCWC Board Member, Cherie Dolehanty

The Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County named Deserae Rivas as their 2021 Jack Reed Memorial Scholarship winner. Rivas will receive $2,000 to continue her education post high school. Rivas is a senior at Richmond High School and intends to study biomedical engineering in order to pursue a career as a plastic surgeon for cancer patients.

"Once (tumors) are removed they leave tissues and scars, causing a daily reminder of the pain you're enduring," Rivas explained about her desire to become a plastic surgeon. "If I can comprehend and embrace the pain these patients are feeling, I can help make it easier with my techniques in my line of work."

Rivas was selected from a group of three finalists by a panel of judges based on her academic merits and involment with the Club. Rivas has been a Club member for 7 years and has participated in Club programs like Biz Kid$, a financial literacy initative that teaches kids about money and business.

"She has an intrinsic drive to succeed that is rarely see among even the brightest of students," Richmond Community Schools STEM Department Head Brandon Hilbert noted of Rivas in a letter of recommendation. "Her determination, intrinsic motivation, and experiences while a student at Richmond Hight School set her apart from others."

Jack Reed was a Board Member of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County and advocate for youth development. After relocating to northern Indiana, Reed was instrumental in helping to open a new Boys & Girls Club in the Fort Wayne area. His dedication to youth and service to his community was remembered by his family when they created the Jack Reed Memorial Scholarship in his honor.

The mission of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County is "to enable all young people, especially those who need us most, to reach their full potential as productive, caring, and responsible citizens." Members of the Club, ages 6-18, have access to dedicated, trained professionals who provide guidance in adopting healthy lifestyles and pursuing educational objectives. Currently, the Club serves over 3,000 youth at five locations: the Jeffers, McDaniel, Central, First Bank, and Hagerstown units and during the summer at their 168-acre Camp Guy located on the Whitewater River. Since 1957, the Club has been striving to equip young people with the skills they need to succeed in life. For more information, visit www.bgcrichmond.org.

New Federal Relief Grants Available Through Restaurant Revitalization Fund

Posted May 3, 2021

Indiana SBDC and gener8tor to help Hoosier businesses apply for grants

INDIANAPOLIS (April 30, 2021) – The U.S. Small Business Administration is launching the Restaurant Revitalization Fund to provide relief for the restaurant and food service industry, which has been disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. Demand for this funding is high, so the Indiana Economic Development Corporation (IEDC) and the Indiana Small Business Development Center (Indiana SBDC) are encouraging Hoosier businesses to register and apply for funding through this program as soon as possible.

Through the Restaurant Revitalization Fund, eligible businesses may receive awards between $1,000 and $5 million per location to offset expenses, such as payroll, supplies, and operating expenses, incurred between Feb. 15, 2020, and March 11, 2023. Interested businesses may register starting today, Friday, April 30, at 9 a.m. EDT, and the portal to submit applications will open on Monday, May 3, at 12:00 p.m. EDT.

To help Hoosier restaurant and food service owners apply for and access available funds, the Indiana SBDC is partnering with gener8tor to offer no-cost webinars, including two in Spanish. The first webinar is scheduled for today at 3 p.m. EDT. Consultations and application assistance will also be offered through designated virtual office hours beginning next week. In addition, Spanish interpretation services will be offered through the regional Indiana SBDC offices. Specific dates, times and more details are available on the Indiana SBDC website.

"Indiana restaurants and food service owners were quick to respond and pivot during the height of the pandemic," said David Watkins, state director for the Indiana SBDC. "We're grateful for their perseverance and want them to know more federal funding will be available through this new relief program. It is vital for eligible Indiana businesses to apply as soon as possible, as we anticipate these federal funds will be distributed quickly across the nation."

RESTAURANT REVITALIZATION FUND

Grant Details:

  • The SBA may provide funding up to $5 million per location, not to exceed $10 million total for the applicant and any affiliated businesses.
  • The minimum award is $1,000.
  • Eligible expenses include business expenses such as payroll, supplies, and operating expenses, construction of outdoor seating and some business debt.
  • Funds must be spent on expenses that were/are incurred between February 15, 2020 and March 11, 2023.

Eligibility

Eligible entities are businesses that are not permanently closed and include businesses where the public or patrons assemble for the primary purpose of being served food or drink.

This includes:

  • Restaurants
  • Food stands, food trucks, food carts
  • Caterers
  • Bars, saloons, lounges, taverns
  • Snack and nonalcoholic beverage bars (e.g., coffee shops, ice cream shops)
  • Bakeries (onsite sales to the public comprise at least 33% of gross receipts)
  • Brewpubs, tasting rooms, taprooms* (onsite sales to the public comprise at least 33% of gross receipts)
  • Breweries and/or microbreweries* (onsite sales to the public comprise at least 33% of gross receipts)
  • Wineries and distilleries* (onsite sales to the public comprise at least 33% of gross receipts)
  • Inns* (onsite sales of food and beverage to the public comprise at least 33% of gross receipts)
  • Licensed facilities or premises of a beverage alcohol producer where the public may taste, sample, or purchase products
  • Other similar places of business in which the public or patrons assemble for the primary purpose of being served food or drink

Register & Apply

Registration, more details and the application are available at sba.gov/restaurants. Account registration opens today, Friday, April 30, at 9:00 a.m. EDT, and the portal to submit applications will open Monday, May 3, at 12:00 p.m. EDT.

For more information on available recovery and relief resources, programs and grants available to small businesses, including the Indiana Small Business Restart Grant and Indiana Hospitality and Entertainment Grant, please visit isbdc.org/covid-resources.

About Indiana SBDC

The Indiana Small Business Development Center (Indiana SBDC) is a program of the Indiana Economic Development Corporation, which leads the state of Indiana's economic development efforts. The Indiana SBDC helps entrepreneurs launch, grow and locate businesses in the state, providing entrepreneurs with expert guidance and resources on how to start and grow a business. With a network of 10 regional offices through the state, the Indiana SBDC creates a positive and measurable impact on the formation, growth and sustainability of Indiana's small businesses.

The Indiana SBDC is funded, in part, through a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Small Business Administration. All opinions, conclusions, and/or recommendations expressed herein are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the SBA. For more information about the Indiana SBDC, visit www.isbdc.org.

Reid Health's Focus on Perinatal and Infant Loss Support Inspires Donation

Posted May 3, 2021

Supplied Photo: Stephanie Nicholson (left), Reid Health'sIt's been eight months since Claire Olson and her husband, Jared, lost their daughter Piper halfway through Claire's pregnancy.

In the time since, the couple have launched an effort in Piper's name that aims to support other families grieving the loss of a life that had only just begun.

Piper's Purpose, a group made up of Claire and a few volunteers, have been making donations of handmade blankets, candles, and more to hospitals and OB/GYN offices. On Friday, she and Jared dropped off their latest gift at Reid Health.

The donation was a special one for the couple. It was the first time Jared had been able to be there with Claire when the items were presented.

"He's always had to work in the past," Claire said, "but we are trying to represent both the support of the mom and the dad."

The donations, dubbed Piper's Packages, typically consist of a small handmade blanket, candles, pregnancy and infant loss stickers, and information about Return to Zero: H.O.P.E., a non-profit organization focused on raising awareness of pregnancy and infant loss issues.

"I wouldn't be able to connect with the loss community and expand our mission if it weren't for family, friends, and volunteer support," Claire said.

For Reid, the gift was a bit different, consisting of items for siblings such as children's books about death and dying.

"Especially for Reid, we branched out to find ways to support the living siblings," Claire said.

"I really do think Reid has one of the most comprehensive bereavement programs I've come across. I would definitely encourage others to use Reid because they'll be well taken care of from a bereavement standpoint." -- Claire Olson of Piper's Purpose

There's also something for providers, including cards and little items that can be given to the nurses who work with families who have suffered a loss.

"These nurses experience the grief, too," Claire said. "These are little things if they need a pick-me-up."

When Piper's Purpose was just beginning, the first contact Claire made with any hospital was to Stephanie Nicholson, Reid's Resolve Through Sharing Bereavement Coordinator.

"She took my call, which is a big deal, and then we talked forever. She was very supportive of our mission and was very receptive to the idea that the things we were offering could be used and could be a benefit at Reid," Claire said.

"From our first conversation, I was really drawn to what Reid is doing. She just kind of affirmed everything that I had seen on their website that was being implemented."

Claire had been drawn to the section of the Reid Health website that deals with perinatal and infant loss. What she found there suggested Reid was serious about helping families grieve, a trait that was rare in her early experience with Piper's Purpose.

As time passed and Claire worked with other health systems, her belief that Reid's program was special strengthened.

"I really do think Reid has one of the most comprehensive bereavement programs I've come across. I would definitely encourage others to use Reid because they'll be well taken care of from a bereavement standpoint," Claire said.

"It appears there is leadership and overall hospital network support for providing comprehensive bereavement resources to families, which is something I don't always see."

"To have the Reid leadership support and then someone like Stephanie running the program, I think that's a special combination." -- Claire Olson

Claire credits Nicholson for building a program to support families at a time when it's needed most.

"She just has a special personality and ability to relate and be compassionate, and I think that translates into the program," Claire said. "It's her leadership, commitment, and understanding of this type of loss and how to give full support from the beginning to the end. She seems very passionate about continuing to develop the bereavement resources.

"To have the Reid leadership support and then someone like Stephanie running the program, I think that's a special combination."

Although bereavement support has been present at Reid's Family Birthing Center for more than two decades, since 2018, many of the staff there, at the Reid OB/GYN office, and in outpatient surgery have taken courses in being a bereavement support person.

"That's something that's definitely not in every facility," Nicholson said.

Claire agreed.

"To have people actually trained in managing those moments in the hospital with the family is so important. The situation is already very traumatic for the family. That's huge to be able to have training support that's valued," she said.

If you have questions about Reid's Perinatal & Infant Loss Program, please contact Stephanie Nicholson by calling the Family Birthing Center at (765) 983-3020.

For more information about Piper's Purpose, visit their website at piperspurpose.org or their Facebook page.

Pack Expansion: IU East Adds Varsity Esports

Posted May 3, 2021

Supplied Photo:  IU East is adding varsity esports at the start of the 2021 academic year.
IU East is adding varsity esports at the start of the 2021 academic year.

Red Wolf Nation welcomes esports to the Pack.

Indiana University East will add a varsity esports program starting with the 2021-22 school year.

Esports is a video game-based form of competition that has rocketed in popularity in recent years.

"We're excited to be the first IU regional campus to offer varsity esports," said IU East Director of Athletics Joe Griffin. "We know esports is an up-and-coming activity, and we see that it is something our students really want here at IU East."

IU East plans to launch teams competing in five to seven games. League of Legends and Rocket League teams in particular appear to be natural fits for the IU East Varsity Esports Team. The Esports Club at IU East already competes in both games. Other teams will be considered based on student interest and the development of the varsity program.

Work on an IU East esports arena, powered by Alienware, is already underway.

IU East first entered into the esports world when a group of students formed the Esports Club at IU East in 2019. The student club will continue, in the hopes the varsity and club squads will benefit each other in their growth and development. The club will switch gears and rebrand to more of a social/non-competitive environment to provide gaming based gatherings and events on campus.

Andy Britt and Kaly Irvine will serve as coaches for the esports teams. IU East students or prospective students can contact the coaches with an email to RWEsport@iue.edu, or fill out a recruiting form at iueredwolves.com/recruiting.php (click the 'esports' tab).

For more information and updates on Esports at IU East, visit Red Wolves Athletics at iueredwolves.com.

INDOT to Resurface Portions of US 40 in Henry and Wayne Counties

Posted May 3, 2021

The Indiana Department of Transportation will intermittently close lanes on US 40 for a paving job in Eastern Henry and Wayne Counties.

Crews will be working to repave sections of US 40 EB and WB from Dunreith to East Germantown.

One lane in each direction will be open during construction. In town, crews will potentially use flaggers during construction.

Crews will begin working on US 40 starting end of April. Construction is scheduled to be complete by the end of October 2021.

During construction, the public is asked to slow down and be mindful of crews in the area. All work is weather dependent. For the latest information, follow @INDOTEast on Twitter and INDOT East Central on Facebook.

COVID-19 Vaccinations Now Available at Reid Urgent Cares in Richmond, Connersville

Posted April 29, 2021

Those looking to be vaccinated for COVID-19 have two new options for scheduling their appointments now that Reid Health's Urgent Care facilities in Richmond and Connersville have begun administering shots.

Free vaccinations at the Richmond (1501 Chester Blvd.) and Connersville (1475 E. State Road 44) sites are available from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday-Sunday. There is no office fee or copay for vaccination-only visits.

"We're pleased to be able to offer vaccinations at these new locations," said Thomas Huth, M.D., Vice President of Medical Affairs at Reid Health. "Our goal is to get as many people as possible vaccinated as quickly as possible."

A separate treatment space has been established in the Urgent Cares to administer the vaccine. Patients will wait out the required 15-minute, post-inoculation observation period in the lobby area, which is socially distanced with each chair cleaned after it's vacated.

Appointments should be scheduled through the state website, ourshot.in.gov, using either the Firefox or Chrome web browser. Look for Reid Health UC Richmond or Reid Health UC Connersville among the list of options.

After an appointment has been made, a link will be sent to complete the registration. That information doesn't have to be filled out before arriving for the scheduled vaccination but doing so ahead of time will speed up the process.

"The longer it takes to get people vaccinated, the higher the likelihood that one of these variants could catch hold or even a new one might pop up that the vaccines are less effective against. We need everyone to do their part and register to be vaccinated. That's how we'll eventually be able to end this pandemic." -- Thomas Huth, M.D., Vice President of Medical Affairs

The Indiana Department of Health has designated 211 as a call line for assistance, but Reid has been made aware at least some local sites aren't showing for 211 staff as having available appointments. Patients should specifically ask for the Richmond or Connersville Urgent Care if 211 staff don't initially offer it as an option.

Everyone 16 and older is eligible to be vaccinated in Indiana, but only the Pfizer vaccine has been approved by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration for those ages 16-17. Reid's Urgent Care sites use the Pfizer product.

Parents or legal guardians of minor children who will be vaccinated need to be present at the child's appointment.

Although the spread of COVID has diminished recently in Reid's service area, variants of the virus circulating around the country, including in Indiana, have health officials worried a new wave of cases could be in our future if vaccination numbers don't rise more quickly.

"The longer it takes to get people vaccinated, the higher the likelihood that one of these variants could catch hold or even a new one might pop up that the vaccines are less effective against," Dr. Huth said.

"We need everyone to do their part and register to be vaccinated. That's how we'll eventually be able to end this pandemic."

Mission, Vision, Values: Reid Health Sets Expectations for 'Kind of Organization We Strive To Be'

Posted April 29, 2021

Nearly 30 years ago, the leaders of Reid Memorial Hospital changed the name of their organization and created a new mission statement, both with the intent to better reflect shifts in healthcare at the time.

During the following three decades, the name would change again but the mission statement remained.

Until now.

Reid Health has set new guides for its future, adopting statements that spell out the mission, vision, and values for the institution that will help govern decision-making over the coming years.

"Our mission and vision statements along with our organizational values are meant to inspire our team members and the communities we serve while also helping guide us in the short and long terms," said Craig Kinyon, Reid Health President/CEO. "These will influence our priorities, activities, and responsibilities for the years ahead.

"We want to clearly state for our team members, our patients, their families, and our communities where our priorities lie, the kind of organization we strive to be, and give a clear roadmap on what is required to improve the health of individuals in our service area."

Since 1992, Reid's mission statement has read:

"Wholeness -- in body, mind, and spirit -- is basic to fulfillment of human potential. Reid Hospital & Health Care Services and its people work with others to enhance wholeness for all those we serve. Our convictions include commitment to compassion, service, excellence, value. These convictions are expressed daily through C.A.R.E. principles, the active demonstration of courtesy, attitude, respect, enthusiasm. These principles are directed toward those people we are privileged to serve and among all of us who serve."

As was the case when that guiding statement was adopted, Reid Health officials now wanted to create something that better reflected the current state of healthcare.

"We want to clearly state for our team members, our patients, their families, and our communities where our priorities lie, the kind of organization we strive to be, and give a clear roadmap on what is required to improve the health of individuals in our service area." -- Craig Kinyon, Reid Health President/CEO

"Reid Health has grown and changed exponentially since the last revision of our mission statement in 1992," said Tom Hilkert, Chairman of the Governing Board. "Because we have evolved from a single hospital into a multi-county, full-service regional healthcare system, our focus has expanded to include an even greater emphasis on the wellness and well-being of each individual we serve."

"While it has stood the test of time, most organizations update their mission statements at least every five years," said Jennifer Ehlers, Reid Health Vice President/Chief Quality Officer. "Healthcare has changed dramatically from focusing only on healing the sick to today's world of preventing illness in the first place."

"We wanted to revisit these core tenants to ensure they properly reflect the organization we are today as well as the one we will continue to aspire to be in the future," Kinyon said.

The new statements are much shorter and focused, reflecting a trend in the healthcare industry.

Our Mission:

To lead our communities to well-being, one person at a time

Our Vision:

Healthier people, thriving communities, trusted partner

Our Values:

Excellence, empathy, integrity, accountability

"These set the standards our team members are accountable to fulfill. They represent the culture we must maintain and give team members a clear understanding of what is important to us as an organization to serve the needs of our patients and our community," Kinyon said.

"For our patients and their families, these represent the level of care they should expect to receive from Reid Health."

The process to create the new statements began more than a year ago in January 2020. Reid's executive team and governing board came together to consider the elements of strong mission and vision statements.

They reviewed the current mission statement and explored industry best practices, eventually developing three drafts that then were whittled down to one mission and vision statement. Those were shared with the entire board, leadership, workforce, medical staff, and key community partners, including Reid's volunteer group, patient advisory groups and external organizations.

"While it has stood the test of time, most organizations update their mission statements at least every five years. Healthcare has changed dramatically from focusing only on healing the sick to today's world of preventing illness in the first place." -- Jennifer Ehlers, Reid Health Vice President/Chief Quality Officer

From there, the focus shifted to identifying Reid's core values. A diverse group of employees was assembled to serve as a focus group to develop a new list.

"Their work later was shared with the executive team, board, and other stakeholders with minor adjustments made to the excellent work completed by the focus group," Ehlers said.

Governing board member Denise Retz was a member of the team that took on the task of establishing the new core values. Part of that effort involved talking through the C.A.R.E. principles from the previous mission statement.

"What has defined Reid Health through the years has been those C.A.R.E. principles. That's ingrained into the Reid Health team and the culture," Retz said. "It was neat to see how different departments look at the values depending on what area of healthcare they work in.

"It all came back to why they're really there, and that was the service they want to provide. It also came down to, 'How do we define what Reid wants in our values going forward?'."

Then-governing board member Aleasia Stewart also was part of the group working on the core values.

"During the process, we heard firsthand from Reid team members what they believe about the organization. There is compassion and a genuine sense of caring for patients and their families by the Reid team," she said.

"During the work sessions, great care was taken to hear participants and focus on common ground. I believe the final product reflects inclusivity and the collective thinking of the group."

"It all came back to why they're really there, and that was the service they want to provide. It also came down to, 'How do we define what Reid wants in our values going forward?'." -- Denise Retz, Reid governing board member

Retz hopes the communities that Reid serves will take notice of the new mission and vision statements and core values. To her, they reflect the kind of organization that Reid wants to be and set standards that meet and exceed patient, family, and visitor expectations.

"I'd like to know what Reid's values are before I walk in the door for care," she said. "To me, aside from being a board member, I would like to know what their mission, vision, and values are before I even think about giving them my business, and as a board member, I want to know those things before I consider sitting on their board. As an employee, you want to know they have the same morals and values as you do before you think of joining the team.

"This is why this process is so valuable. The mission, vision, and values truly come from each person that walks through the door and should reflect in how we make them feel."

Watch a new video about the culture at Reid Health, Within Our Walls.

IU East Celebrates Outstanding Students During Virtual Honors Convocation

Posted April 29, 2021

Indiana University East is celebrating the accomplishments of its students with a virtual Honors Convocation on April 22. The Honors Convocation is an annual event to announce the recipients of Chancellor's Scholar Awards, Outstanding Student Awards, and Honors Program graduates.

The Honors Convocation is available to watch on IU East Facebook Live Premiere at https://www.facebook.com/iueast/videos/2927443414166210.

Additionally, IU East has announced this year's Naomi Osborne Scholar, Hannah Buehner of Connersville, Indiana. The Naomi Osborne Award is an honor given to the graduate with the highest grade point average. Buehner will receive a Bachelor of Arts in Communication Studies and a Bachelor of Arts in Spanish.

Chancellor's Scholar Awards are campus-wide awards, presented to the highest achieving seniors, by academic school.

School of Business and Economics

  • Falen Pope, Indianapolis, Indiana

School of Education

  • Erika Gallaher, New Paris, Ohio

School of Humanities and Social Sciences

  • Michael Richmond, Connersville, Indiana

School of Natural Science and Mathematics

  • Calev Isaacson, Phoenix, Arizona

School of Nursing and Health Sciences

  • Anna Butler, Noblesville, Indiana

School of Social Work

  • Elena Jennings, Liberty, Indiana

Outstanding Student Awards were given to individuals in their degree programs who displayed outstanding academic achievement at IU East. Students receiving awards are the following:

School of Business and Economics

  • Emily Merrell, Brookville, Indiana, Outstanding Student in Accounting
  • Kelly Byrd, Outstanding Student in Business Administration
  • Adrian Calderon, Richmond, Indiana, Outstanding Student in Entrepreneurship
  • Tyler Hochwalt, Scotsdale, Arizona, Outstanding Student in Finance
  • Curtis Robbins, Knightstown, Indiana, Outstanding Student in Information Systems or Informatics
  • Magda Linette, Poznan, Wielkopolskie, Poland, Outstanding Student in Marketing

School of Education

  • Mary Beth McMurry, Connersville, Indiana, Outstanding Student in Elementary Education
  • Tori Harker, Lebanon, Indiana, Outstanding Elementary Education Student Teacher
  • Madison Lakes, Eaton, Ohio, Outstanding Student in Secondary Education
  • Michelle Monnin, Greenville, Ohio, Outstanding Secondary Education Student Teacher
  • Kate Bennett, Indianapolis, Indiana, Outstanding Graduate Student

School of Humanities and Social Sciences

  • Tiani Christian, Richmond, Indiana, Outstanding Student in Communications Studies
  • Risa Griffin, Richmond, Indiana, Outstanding Student in Criminal Justice
  • Kari Mynhier, Wawaka, Indiana, Outstanding Student in English
  • Calen Crumpton, Connersville, Indiana, Outstanding Student in History
  • Austin Haus, Hagerstown, Indiana, Outstanding Student in Humanities
  • Audra deFalco, Flushing, New York, Outstanding Student in Political Science
  • Rachel Washington, Indianapolis, Indiana, Outstanding Student in Psychology
  • Katie Hassan, Bloomington, Indiana, Outstanding Student in Sociology
  • Angely Luna Martinez, San Juan, Puerto Rico, Outstanding Student in Spanish
  • Lauren Murray, Richmond, Indiana, Outstanding Graduate Student in English

School of Natural Science and Mathematics

  • Zachery Honeycutt, Richmond, Indiana, Outstanding Student in Biochemistry
  • Kelsey Clark, Albion, Indiana, Outstanding Student in Biology
  • Kelsea Joseph, Middletown, Ohio, Outstanding Student in General Studies
  • Emma Lewis, Springport, Indiana, Outstanding Student in Human Life Science
  • Elizabeth Barnett, Valley Village, California, Outstanding Student in Mathematics
  • Alyssa Couch, Roanoke, Indiana, Outstanding Student in Natural Science and Mathematics, Bachelors of Arts
  • Nicole Weber, Manteno, Illinois, Outstanding Graduate Student in Biology
  • Zachary Keller, Portland, Indiana, Outstanding Graduate Student in Mathematics

School of Nursing and Health Sciences

  • Madeline Roggy, Bloomington, Indiana, Outstanding Student in Applied Health Sciences
  • Stephanie Fortman, Cambridge City, Indiana, Outstanding Student in Bachelor of Science in Nursing
  • Abby Weitzel, Celina, Ohio, Outstanding Student in RN to B.S.N.
  • Tonya Miller, Richmond, Indiana, Outstanding Student in M.S.N.

School of Social Work

  • Courtney Pillow, Greenfield, Indiana, Outstanding Bachelor of Social Work

IU East Honors Program Graduates

  • Brooke Conway, Richmond, Indiana
  • Shannon Dice, Connersville, Indiana
  • Calev Isaacson, Phoenix, Arizona
  • Julie Kramer, Ansonia, Ohio
  • Julia McCullough, Gordon, Ohio
  • Emily Merrell, Brookville, Indiana
  • Julie Miller, Nashville, Tennessee
  • Brooke Perreira, Greenville, Ohio
  • Falen Pope, Indianapolis, Indiana
  • Ruan Roelofse, Cape Town, South Africa
  • Nicole Visse, Batavia, Ohio
  • Tatyana Whited, Brownsburg, Indiana

Singles Interaction, Inc.

Posted April 26, 2021

Supplied Flyer: Singles Interaction May 2021

If you are 21 years of age or better and single, divorced, widow or widower, Singles' Interaction invites you to join them on Friday nights. Come to the Eagles Lodge, 75 South 12th Street, Richmond (membership not required) and meet other single people in the Richmond area.

Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County to Open New Location in Townsend Memorial Building

Posted April 21, 2021

Supplied Flyer: Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County Open House

The Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County are celebrating the opening of the new First Bank Boys & Girls Club at the Rev. James M. Townsend Memorial Building with a ribbon cutting ceremony by the Wayne County Area Chamber of Commerce and an open house on Thursday, May 27th from 4-6pm. Community members are invited to tour the new facility and sign-up information will be available for families interested in joining the Boys & Girls Clubs.

Garry Kleer, First Bank President and CEO and Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County Board Member, is excited about this opportunity to collaborate with the Clubs, stating, "First Bank is proud of the long-standing partnership that we have had with the Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County. We have been involved in many aspects over the years including support of the Clubs' operations through our legacy sponsorship and our employees volunteering at their seasonal Christmas shop."

The First Bank Boys & Girls Club represents a community-wide effort to bring the Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County and their afterschool programming to a previously unserved area of Richmond. First Bank Richmond, Reid Healthcare, Paul and Pat Lingle Charitable Fund, Urban Enterprise Association, Stamm Koechlein Family Foundation, Economic Growth Group, and the Wayne County Foundation pledged multi-year donations to ensure the Club's success. State-of-the-art technology and high-speed internet access for Club Members were made possible through partnerships with Belden Wire and Cable and Parallax Systems. The Housing Authority of Richmond financed renovations to the Rev. James M. Townsend Memorial Building customized to Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County's unique needs including a new roof, HVAC and electric system updates, program spaces, and a restored gymnasium.

"The Housing Authority of the City of Richmond and the Boys and Girls Clubs of Wayne County have a long-standing working relationship in serving our community," remarked Housing Authority Executive Director and Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County Board Member Derek White. "This latest venture at the Rev. James M. Townsend Memorial Building is the fruit of that partnership, and for that, we are grateful."

"The First Bank Boys & Girls Club at the Rev. James M. Townsend Memorial Building will help further the Clubs' mission of promoting academic success, healthy lifestyles, and good character and citizenship to its members," Kleer reflected. "First Bank's gift fosters our philosophy of 'Doing Great Things Together' within our community."

The mission of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County is "to enable all young people, especially those who need us most, to reach their full potential as productive, caring, and responsible citizens." Members of the Club, ages 6-18, have access to dedicated, trained professionals who provide guidance in adopting healthy lifestyles and pursuing educational objectives. Currently, the Club serves over 3,000 youth at five locations: the Jeffers, McDaniel, Central, First Bank, and Hagerstown units and during the summer at their 168-acre Camp Guy located on the Whitewater River. Since 1957, the Club has been striving to equip young people with the skills they need to succeed in life. For more information, visit www.bgcrichmond.org.

Community Benefit Gives $120,000-Plus to Mental Health and Substance Misuse Programs

Posted April 21, 2021

In the first of two grant cycles this year, Reid Health Community Benefit is giving more than $120,000 to 19 local organizations.

The first cycle of 2021 was focused on Mental Health & Substance Misuse, with $129,342 being awarded to a mix of nonprofits, schools and governmental entities.

Requests were evaluated based on their ability to impact the number of adults who smoke, the death rate due to drug poisoning, mothers who smoke during pregnancy, age-adjusted death rate due to suicide, child abuse rate, non-fatal emergency visits due to opioid overdose, and poor mental health average number of days.

Applications for the second cycle -- Physical Activity, Nutrition, and Weight -- are open until May 20. Those will be evaluated based on their ability to impact access to exercise opportunities, adults age 20 and older who are obese, adults 20 and older who are sedentary, child food insecurity rate, and food insecurity rate.

The awards for the first cycle include:

  • $11,250 to Birth to Five to support the Healthy Families program.
  • $11,250 to Boys & Girls Clubs of Wayne County for its Prevention Plus programming.
  • $3,750 to Brighter Path to provide scholarship opportunities for children and adults with disabilities for the therapeutic benefits of equine therapy.
  • $5,250 to Children's Advocacy Center of Randolph County for body safety education for students and adults in all Randolph County schools.
  • $5,090 to Genesis of Richmond to support group-based programming.
  • $5,000 to Independent Living Center of Eastern Indiana for supplies and administrative costs for the local ramp program.
  • $10,875 to JACY House to support personnel costs and program materials for MBF Prevention Education programs in Reid's service area.
  • $2,000 to Love Makes Cents/NATCO Empowerment Center for the implementation of Your Financial Future, a program designed to teach individuals ages 16-30 basic financial skills.
  • $1,300 to Monroe Central Schools for a Sensory Pathway in the halls for Randolph County fourth-sixth-grade students to support social and emotional learning as part of the student environment.
  • $2,900 to Northeastern Elementary School for the development of a sensory room to assist with brain breaks, self-regulation, and classroom re-entry to support the social and emotional learning environment.
  • $7,500 to Preble County Arts Association for art workshops for first responders as a means of self-care and stress relief.
  • $7,000 to Randolph Eastern School Corporation to expand the Leader in Me program to seventh and eighth grades.
  • $7,500 to Servants at Work to build wooden ramps for those with financial need in Reid's service area.
  • $2,500 to Senior Opportunity Services to provide individuals in Wayne County with homemaker services.
  • $11,247 to The Journey Home to support staffing for the Harm Reduction Veterans Outreach Team.
  • $12,480 to The Shepherd's Way (Cross Road Christian Recovery Center) to support implementation of the Wellness Action Recovery Plan for Addictions: Finding Freedom from Unwanted Patterns program.
  • $9,200 to Wayne County Sheriff's Department for DARE programming for Nettle Creek, Western Wayne, Centerville-Abington, Seton Catholic and Northeastern Wayne schools.
  • $11,250 to Whole Family Community Initiative to support the cost of an on-site counselor for the women participating in programming at The House of Ruth.
  • $2,000 to YMCA of Darke County for the Physical Training for Change (PT4C) program that works with adults on probation for drug-related charges to infuse healthy activity as an outlet.

Community benefit is the basis of the tax-exempt status of not-for-profit hospitals. Community benefit is defined as programs or activities that improve access to health services, enhance public health, advance health knowledge through research and education, and/or relieve the burden of government to improve health.

In 2010, the Affordable Care Act added new requirements for tax-exempt hospitals in the areas of community health needs assessment (CHNA), implementation strategy, billing and collections, and reporting. In 2014, the IRS issued final rules implementing these requirements. The goals of these provisions are to ensure tax-exempt hospitals are meeting the health needs of their communities and to ensure greater transparency and accountability.

Grants, along with other specific outreach and requirements to meet Reid Health's not-for-profit status, have put more than $179 million back into the community in the past five years. A committee of Reid's governing board and community members reviews grant requests. The grants are awarded as part of the health system's efforts as a mission-driven, not-for-profit organization.

Recovery Church Richmond Celebrates 2 Year Anniversary

Posted April 21, 2021

Supplied Flyer: Recovery Church Richmond 2 Year Anniversary

You are invited to celebrate with Recovery Church Richmond on Tuesday, April 27th from 5:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. as they celebrate their 2 year anniversary. The Church is located at 1004 North A Street, Richmond. Free dinner begins at 5:30 p.m., testimony and crosses begin at 6:30 p.m. with cake and giveawyas at 7:30 p.m. Questions? Call 765.204.2175.

First Bank Richmond Celebrates IU Day with $10,000 Matching Gift for IU East Cares Crowdfunding Campaign

Posted April 21, 2021

In celebration of IU Day today, Indiana University East launched its IU East Cares Crowdfunding Campaign.

As the Indiana University community celebrates IU Day, First Bank Richmond is celebrating IU East with a $10,000 matching gift opportunity for alumni and friends of the campus for gifts made to the Chancellor's Fund. The Chancellor's Fund supports programs and initiatives to provide unique educational opportunities for IU East students.

First Bank Richmond will match all gifts, up to $500 per donor, given to IU East today, April 21. The total $10,000 matching gift amount is selected as a way to honor the 10,000 IU East alumni.

"First Bank Richmond does so much for the IU East campus and the community," said Vice Chancellor of External Affairs Jason Troutwine. "This year IU Day is back and we are excited to connect with our alumni, campus and community. We are thankful First Bank Richmond is providing a match gift as part of sharing our celebrations, joy and connections as an IU family."

This is also Campus Campaign week for the university, the annual fundraising initiative among faculty and staff for important programs and scholarships on the IU East campus.

First Bank has provided similar match programs in the past for IU Day, which have been well received by the campus community and friends.

Gifts can be made at crowdfunding.iu.edu/iu-east-cares.

LifeStream's Aging Well Conference Rescheduled to 2022

Posted April 21, 2021

LifeStream Services has rescheduled the 17th Annual Aging Well Conference to Thursday, June 2, 2022. This decision was made out of an abundance of caution to help protect the community from the ongoing pandemic and the threat for severe infection for older adults, the event's primary audience.

The Aging Well Conference will be held at the Horizon Convention Center in Muncie. The event is designed for older adults, caregivers, wellness enthusiasts, and health professionals to learn how to make positive changes in their lives and the lives of others. The conference includes a resource fair, light breakfast, lunch, keynote speaker, and educational breakout sessions.

Registration and sponsorship/resource fair information will be released early spring 2022. Those who would like more information or to receive registration information to their home/email may contact Angie Jenkins, Outreach Coordinator, at 765-759-1121 or ajenkins@lifestreaminc.org.

Special thanks to our sponsors: Healing Hands Home Health, Heaven Sent Home Healthcare, Reid Health Alliance Medicare, Community Hospital Anderson, Heart to Heart Hospice, Henry Community Health, Humana, Guardian Medical Monitoring, and Silver Birch of Muncie.

Reid Health – Connersville Opens to Public for Financial Assistance

Posted April 21, 2021

Patients needing financial assistance now can access it at Reid Health - Connersville.

The office on the first floor of the facility at 1941 Virginia Ave. will be open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Facemasks will be required to enter the building, and the office will practice social distancing.

Anyone with questions can call (765) 983-3184 or (855) 753-7125.

Newly Sworn-In Police Officers Bring Reid Health's Total to 17

Posted April 13, 2021

Supplied Photo:  Reid Health President/CEO Craig Kinyon (right) swears in four new police officers (from left) Scott Jackson, Cory Jenkins, Billy Terhaar, and Scott Roberts.A process that began more than a year ago is moving into its final phases now as another quartet of Reid Health security officers were sworn in as police officers Monday.

Officers Scott Jackson, Cory Jenkins, Scott Roberts, and Billy Terhaar took their oaths in front of family on the main Reid campus, joining the 13 others who have preceded them since the department's creation in February 2020.

The four will take part in the eight-week training course at the Indiana Law Enforcement Academy next month.

"All of the guys have done really well," said Randy Kolentus, Chief of Police for Reid Health. "It's no surprise they've been successful.

To complete the transition from a security force to a police department, another eight team members will need to be sworn in and sent off to the academy. Kolentus is hopeful that four of those will go in August.

In all, the makeover is running slightly ahead of the two-year timeframe that Kolentus originally estimated for completing the change.

"We're ahead of schedule. Hopefully, COVID will stay down and we'll be able to finish yet this year." -- Randy Kolentus, Reid Health Chief of Police

"We're ahead of schedule. Hopefully, COVID volumes will stay low and we'll be able to finish yet this year," he said.

Reid began to transform its security team to a police department early last year, joining other health systems around the state. The move is intended to enhance the security and safety of those who use Reid services.

The change reflects the growth of the health system and the accompanying increase in the need for police assistance. When the intention to establish the department first was announced, Kolentus noted the Richmond Police Department responded to Reid calls almost 900 times in 2019.

The former Security Department has grown from nine officers in 2016 to more than 20 team members today as Reid's geographic footprint has increased and its number of staff has risen to some 3,400 people.

"It's always so nice to see the families come out to support our officers and help them celebrate," said Jennifer Ehlers, Reid Health Vice President/Chief Quality Officer. "I've very proud of this team. They provide outstanding service to our patients, their families, and our staff."

2021 Student Research Day Award Winners

Posted April 13, 2021

Indiana University East held Student Research Day on April 2. The annual event features the work of on-campus and online undergraduate students and for the campus to celebrate their achievements.

This is the second year in a row the event was held virtually under COVID-19 safety and health guidelines. Student Research Day presentations were held on Canvas throughout the day.

The keynote address by Katelyn Brown, D.D.S., B.S. and B.A. '16, and awards presentation was held on Facebook Live at https://www.facebook.com/events/3756379024476213. Brown is an associate dentist and practices locally in Richmond. She completed her doctorate from the IU School of Dentistry in July 2020.

Student presentations included independent scholarship from courses, independent studies, summer research programs, Honors Program projects and creative endeavors. Honors Program students will also have the option to present at the Mid-East Honors Association (MEHA) Conference. The annual Student Showcase included works of art from students in the 2020 summer and fall semesters, 2021 spring semester, and Senior Capstone exhibits. Merit monetary awards are given annually through the sponsorship of Stagg Safety of Richmond, Robert Warfel, president.

Award winners received $200 for first place, $150 for second, $100 for third and fourth $75. Funding provided for by the Office of Academic Affairs. Winners this year were:

Oral Presentation Award Winners
  • First Place: Austin Haus, humanities and music double major, Richmond, Indiana, "Evolution of Technique and Composition With the Piano."
  • Second Place: Makenna Gunckel, elementary education major, Arcanum, Ohio, "The Benefits of Delaying Kindergarten Entrance Age."
  • Third Place: Hannah Buehner, Spanish and communication studies double major, "Las Jarchas: Sharing Timeless Truths with Future Generations."
  • Fourth Place: Renee Cooper, elementary education major, Richmond, Indiana, "Two-Way Immersion Schools."
Poster Presentations
  • First Place: Kyle Raihala, mathematics major, Richmond, Indiana, "Analysis of the Cycling Network's Safety in Trier, Germany Using Arc GIS Pro."
  • Second Place: Sandy Zimmerman, history major, Virginia Beach, Virginia, "Magic and Ritual Beliefs as Justification for Murder, Enslavement, or Wrongful Death."
  • Third Place: Jonathan Kerby-White, mathematics major, Bloomington, Indiana, "Limits: The Fundamental Concept of Calculus."
  • Fourth Place: Katharine (Kat) Sterrett, business administration major, Manilla, Indiana, "The Balance Sheet and Financial Disclosures."
Honors Showcase

Four-way tie for first place:

  • Donovan Chang, mathematics major, Seoul, South Korea, "Hitting Times on Star-Shaped Graphs."
  • Shannon Dice, general studies major, Connersville, Indiana, "Rural Indiana Treasures."
  • Calev Isaacson, mathematics major, Phoenix, Arizona, "Modeling Quantum Gravity."
  • Tatyana Whited, business administration major, Brownsburg, Indiana, "Breaking Down Barriers and Building Bridges: Bringing More Women Into the Study of STEAM." Whitehead received the Vanguard Award, given to the senior honors thesis that displays extraordinary vision and social impact.

Earlham College's Men's Basketball Holds Mulch Sale

Posted April 12, 2021

Earlham College's Men's Basketball team will be selling mulch as well as the labor to spread it as an annual fund raiser. Questions should be addressed to Shane Cleveland at 207-206-6270 or clevesh@earlham.edu. Download .pdf form for printing.

Supplied Flyer:  Earlham College Men's Basketball Mulch Sale

IU East Virtual Business Speaker Series Presenter Discusses the Effect of Opiates on American Religion

Posted April 12, 2021

Indiana University East's School of Business and Economics Business Speaker Series presents Daniel Hungerman, Ph.D., a professor of economics at the University of Notre Dame.

Hungerman will virtually present "Opiates of the Masses? Deaths of Despair and the Decline of American Religion" at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, April 13 on IU East Facebook Live at https://www.facebook.com/events/440864203864652.

The lecture is part of IU East's School of Business and Economics Business Speaker Series. The presentation is free and open to the public.

A question and answer period will follow Hungerman's presentation. Viewers will be able to submit their questions via the comments section on Facebook Live.

Hungerman's discussion is based on his research and paper co-written with Tyler Giles, graduate student at the University of Notre Dame, and Tamar Oostrom, assistant professor of economics at The Ohio State University.

In recent decades, the U.S. death rates from poisonings, suicides, and alcoholic liver disease have dramatically increased. The researchers show that the initial rise in these deaths of despair was preceded by a large decline in organized religion, and that both trends were driven by white middle-aged Americans. Using the repeal of blue laws as an exogenous shock to religiosity, they confirm that religious practice can have significant effects on these mortality rates. Their findings show that cultural factors such as organized religion can play an important role in our understanding of deaths of despair.

The Business Speaker Series is sponsored by the Charles Koch Foundation. Co-sponsored by Delta Mu Delta, IU East Center for Economic Education, and the IU East Business and Economic Research Center.

Koenig Offers Fleet of Mobile Service Technicians with New Mobile Response Team

Posted April 8, 2021

Koenig Equipment is excited to announce the company-wide offering of its Mobile Response Team, a fleet of mobile, agricultural service technicians ready to serve ag customers when and where they need it.

"We have spent the previous planting and harvesting seasons piloting the service at a few of our stores," said Matt McConnell, Director of Product Support at Koenig Equipment, "which gave us the opportunity to perfect the process for this season. Our technicians are ready to come to you, in the field, in order to minimize downtime and keep you running during this busy time of year."

The Koenig Mobile Response Team consists of certified technicians with fully equipped service trucks to ensure customers receive the quality service they need right in the field. With the Mobile Response option, Koenig Equipment can offer faster response times due to more technicians ready to serve customers, the convenience of not needing to bring equipment to the shop, and the quality service provided by a collective 306 years of technician experience.

Requesting service from the Mobile Response Team is easy. Simply call the Service Department at your local Koenig location, or schedule service online via our website, and request that the technician comes to you. The Mobile Response Team dispatchers will then find the technician best equipped to meet each customer's needs and send them to the designated service location. To find the nearest Koenig location, visit koenigequipment.com/locations. To schedule service online, visit koenigequipment.com/service/schedule.

"Healing In Nature" Art Exhibit at Reid Health

Posted April 8, 2021

Supplied Photo: Claudia Edwards in McDowell Gallery, Reid Health, Richmond, IndianaCurrently on display in the MacDowell Gallery at Reid Hospital is a photography exhibit by Claudia Edwards titled "Pacha Mama: Healing in Nature." Edwards was born in Peru and has lived in the US for over 23 years. She currently resides in Richmond and is the Executive Director of the Preble County Art Association in Eaton, OH.

Pacha Mama (meaning Mother Nature) is the inspiration for her creative work in which she seeks a deeper connection to her inner self through the healing energy of landscape. Her exhibit includes breathtaking panoramic scenes from nature as well as more industrial subjects such as bridges, trains, and local architectural.

The MacDowell Gallery is located on the second floor of the hospital and the current exhibit will be on display through May 9.

Renovations Underway at Two Reid Health Facilities

Posted April 8, 2021

Work to make room for expanded services has begun at two Reid Health facilities on Richmond's north side.

A project at the Reid Orthopedic Center, 1400 Highland Road, started with selective demolition in the former surgery area, which will be turned into more clinic space for physicians.

There will be 16 new exam rooms, two procedure rooms, physician pods, and two nursing areas. The work also will make a better path to the radiology area by eliminating a maze through the corridors.

"The construction will provide additional room for our service line to grow, offering much-needed services to our patients," said Monica Schlichter, Musculoskeletal Service Line Director for Reid Health.

"We are extremely excited to have a hand surgeon, sports medicine surgeon, primary care sports medicine physician, and our perioperative program join us in addition to our new walk-in clinic to be able to take excellent care of our patients by providing those services right here in Richmond."

According to Jeff Cook, Director of Engineering and Environmental Services at Reid, other improvements coming to the facility include new HVAC equipment to replace older units, a larger main lobby/waiting area, and a reworking of the check-in area for the Reid Pain Management and Reid Podiatry practices.

"We are extremely excited to have a hand surgeon, sports medicine surgeon, primary care sports medicine physician, and our perioperative program join us in addition to our new walk-in clinic to be able to take excellent care of our patients by providing those services right here in Richmond." -- Monica Schlichter, Musculoskeletal Service Line Director

The project is expected to be completed in January.

A couple of miles south, an addition is being built at the facility that houses several Reid practices at 1434 Chester Blvd.

The new area will allow Reid Dermatology to have its own suite while also making room for new physicians coming to Reid ENT, Cook said.

"We are excited to be welcoming new ENT and Dermatology providers into our practices this summer," said Carmela Benge, Director of Surgical Specialties for Reid Health. "With the new construction, the Dermatology practice will move out of the current ENT space into their own wing on the south side of the building, providing room for the addition of new providers and staff.

"This expansion will allow us to continue to provide quality care to our patients and allow our patients to be seen in an appropriate timeframe."

That project should be wrapped up in July.

Reid Health Sets up COVID-19 Vaccine Clinics For Colleges, Richmond State Hospital

Posted April 8, 2021

Reid Health is expanding its COVID-19 vaccination efforts this week, partnering with local colleges and Richmond State Hospital to stand up special clinics for those institutions.

On Thursday, two of the three planned sites will open, including one for the state hospital on its campus and another serving Indiana University East and Ivy Tech Community College Richmond on the IU East campus.

These special clinics are not open to the general public. They are solely for the use of students, faculty, staff, and patients of the institutions.

"We are excited to be able to offer this service to our local colleges and the Richmond State Hospital," said Thomas Huth, M.D., Vice President of Medical Affairs for Reid Health. "We want to do everything we can to ensure as many people as possible get vaccinated.

"The quicker we can get shots in arms, the quicker we can move past this pandemic."

Scheduling for the clinics was set up to ensure both doses of the Pfizer vaccine can be administered before classes at the colleges end for the semester.

"We are hopeful that faculty, staff, and students will take advantage of this opportunity to receive their COVID-19 vaccinations," said Jason Troutwine, Vice Chancellor for External Affairs at IU East. "We appreciate Reid Health and the Indiana Department of Health offering this opportunity to our campus community."

"We are excited to be able to offer this service to our local colleges and the Richmond State Hospital. We want to do everything we can to ensure as many people as possible get vaccinated." -- Thomas Huth, M.D., Vice President of Medical Affairs for Reid Health

Getting students, faculty, and staff vaccinated is critical for a return to in-person instruction next school year.

"I am thrilled that Ivy Tech Community College is partnering with IU East and Reid Health to bring a COVID vaccine clinic to our students and employees," said Lori Handy, Interim Chancellor for Ivy Tech Richmond. "Ivy Tech is planning to be back with face-to-face options for anyone who is looking for on-campus classes this fall and vaccination clinics like this will help make that a reality."

"The quicker we can get shots in arms, the quicker we can move past this pandemic."

The third location -- at Earlham College serving that school and Bethany Theological Seminary -- will open next week.

"We are so fortunate to have a strong community partner in Reid Health," Earlham President Anne Houtman said. "With their expertise, oversight, and coordination, we will greatly accelerate the distribution of the vaccine to our campus community and take a step closer toward business as usual.

"The pandemic has posed significant challenges for higher education, especially residential liberal arts colleges like us. Hands-on, in-person learning experiences are at the heart of our work in the classroom and beyond. Reid has worked with us to address some of those challenges, and this partnership has been a key factor in keeping our campus community safe and healthy. We are eager to get back to what we do best with Reid's support and commitment to the health and safety of our region."

"I would like to take the time to thank Dr. Huth and the COVID team at Reid hospital for working with Richmond State Hospital to provide vaccinations for our clients and staff members. The process of getting approval was smooth and everyone was helpful and nice." -- Paul Stanley, Richmond State Hospital Superintendent

"You did a wonderful service for the community of Wayne County, and we look forward to working together in the future."

"We are grateful to Reid Health for partnering with us to offer easy access to safe and effective vaccines," said Jeff Carter, President of Bethany Theological Seminary.

"Our students, faculty, and staff have been patient, diligent, and resilient throughout the pandemic. We have maintained what we call 'Golden Rule Practices' -- wearing masks, washing hands, maintaining social distance, and now, getting vaccinated. As a result of these efforts, we have had very few cases of COVID in our community. Having a vaccination clinic within walking distance will be a great benefit as we work to keep everyone healthy and safe."

Over the past several weeks, Reid staff has worked with the schools and the state hospital as well as the Indiana Department of Health to plan for how the clinics will run. Reid will provide the vaccine and operate the sites while the IU East School of Nursing and Health Sciences and Ivy Tech School of Nursing will provide staffing by students and faculty to administer the vaccine at the colleges.

"I would like to take the time to thank Dr. Huth and the COVID team at Reid hospital for working with Richmond State Hospital to provide vaccinations for our clients and staff members," said Paul Stanley, Richmond State Hospital Superintendent. "The process of getting approval was smooth and everyone was helpful and nice.

"You did a wonderful service for the community of Wayne County, and we look forward to working together in the future."

Nominations Now Accepted for the LifeStream Golden Hoosier Award

Posted April 8, 2021

LifeStream Services is seeking nominees age 65 or older for the LifeStream Golden Hoosier Award. The community is encouraged to nominate those special volunteers who consistently go above and beyond demonstrating passion and commitment to service in their community.

The nominee must be age 65 or older and currently reside in Blackford, Delaware, Fayette, Franklin, Grant, Henry, Jay, Madison, Randolph, Rush, Union, or Wayne county. The individual must have completed at least three years of volunteer experience after reaching 60 years of age, positively impacting members of the community, an organization, or faith-based organization through volunteer efforts.

A special committee will choose the top 50 nominees and choose the winner of the LifeStream Golden Hoosier Award. This individual will then be nominated for the state of Indiana's prestigious Golden Hoosier Award, which is the highest honor a senior citizen can receive from the state.

Nominations are due no later than April 16 to Laura Bray, LifeStream's Volunteer Services Administrator. Additional information and a nomination form can be accessed by visiting www.lifestreaminc.org/goldenhoosier. Questions? Please call 765-759-3372 or email lbray@lifestreaminc.org.

This award is sponsored by Reid Health Alliance Medicare.

Now Open For Public Walk-Ins: Reid Health and Iu East Are Partnering to Offer a COVID-19 Vaccine Clinic For Campus, Community

Posted April 8, 2021

In an effort to get the COVID-19 vaccine to as many people as possible in the Indiana University East campus community, the on-campus clinic is now open to the public to walk-in and receive the first dose of the vaccine. This includes IU East faculty, staff, students, members of their family and friends, and the public.

Reid Health and Indiana University East are partnering to offer the COVID-19 vaccine clinic from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Thursday, April 8, at the Student Events Center (SEC). Parking will be available at the SEC and the Whitewater Parking lot. Those participating in the clinic should plan to also receive their second dose on Thursday, April 29, from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. at the same location.

Reid Health, IU East and Ivy Tech Community College are working in collaboration with the Indiana Department of Health to provide the vaccinations. The Pfizer vaccine will be distributed. Reid Health will administer and operate the clinics. The IU East School of Nursing and Health Sciences and Ivy Tech School of Nursing will provide staffing by nursing students and faculty.

Walk-in participants will need to bring identification to the clinic in order to receive the vaccine. Anyone who has pre-registered for an appointment should plan to arrive at their scheduled time.

Any faculty, staff or students or walk-in participants are invited to attend the on-campus clinic. This includes those who do not live in Indiana.

Anyone who has previously received a COVID-19 vaccination - either one dose or two doses - will not need to register for the vaccination offered at IU East. It is advised for faculty, staff and students who have received their first dose of a vaccination to return to the same site location for the second dose.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Who is eligible to receive the COVID-19 vaccination at IU East?
    Anyone that is over age 16+ in order to receive a vaccination in Indiana. The vaccination is available to non-Indiana residents.
  • If the first dose has been received at another site location, could I attend the clinic at IU East?
    It is recommended for any faculty, staff, student, or community member who has received the first dose of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccination to return to the same site for their second dose.
  • Which vaccination will be distributed?
    Reid Health will distribute the Pfizer vaccination at the clinic. Participants should plan to receive both doses of the vaccination at IU East.
  • I am not available on April 8th, what should I do?
    Please schedule a vaccine with your local provider. Information about other vaccine locations can be found at vaccine.coronavirus.in.gov/en-US/.
  • Already scheduled somewhere else?
    No problem. If you want to switch your appointment to one at the IU East clinic, simply schedule through the link sent from the state via email or text. Then, call 211 to cancel your existing appointment.
  • Do I have to get my vaccine at IU East?
    No, you don't have to get your vaccine at the on-campus clinic. This clinic is another option to help ensure students, faculty, staff and the community have more access to the vaccine as quickly as possible.

For further questions and answers related to COVID-19 vaccinations, visit covid.iu.edu.

Additional information can be found at reidhealth.org/covid-vaccine.

Masks Are Still Required at Reid Health Facilities

Posted April 6, 2021

Despite the lifting of Indiana Gov. Eric Holcomb's statewide mandate, masking is still required at all Reid Health facilities.

Holcomb recently announced his order that people wear masks in public places because of the COVID-19 pandemic would expire on April 6. In its place, the governor has issued an advisory, urging everyone to continue masking when around other people outside of their household.

Guidelines from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention continue to call for masking in healthcare settings, even for those who have been fully vaccinated against the virus.

Guidelines from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention continue to call for masking in healthcare settings, even for those who have been fully vaccinated against the virus.

"Although the rate of spread is down from the peaks seen a few months ago and the number of people who have been vaccinated has increased, the pandemic is not over," said Craig Kinyon, Reid Health President/CEO.

"We will continue to take necessary precautions to ensure the safety of our patients, their family, and our team members while maintaining our ability to meet our communities' healthcare needs."

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