Violation of constitutional law

Talk of the Town: Just Talk: Government & Politics: Violation of constitutional law
By Elliott on Sunday, May 09, 2004 - 08:02 pm: Edit Post

Is anyone else appauled at the blatant disregard our city government has for the constitution .The city actually facilitated a religious event on the steps pf the municipal building on National Day of Prayer (which is wrong in and of itself) this should not be tolerated .


By Gary on Monday, May 10, 2004 - 07:02 pm: Edit Post

Get a life! Find something else to complain about!


By Jonathan I. King on Monday, May 31, 2004 - 02:49 pm: Edit Post

Elliott, you my friend are incorrect, now before you go and tell me what I just said is unconstitutional, maybe you should read the Constitution. I just got back from a trip to Washington D.C., the nations capital, just in case you didn't know, and inside the Capital Building there are four pictures chosen by various founding fathers and people of importance in the early stages of our country. All four share a common Christian theme. Now, you may say, "Okay, Jon, what is your point, that's unconstitutional too." Well, Mr. Elliott here is my point, those great founding fathers probably knew a little more about the Constitution then you do, and if they didn't think showing the Christian faith inside the capital was wrong, then maybe, just maybe it isn't.....

Amendment I

"Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances."

Assembling on the steps of the Municipal Building in Richmond, Indiana, for the National Day of Prayer is not a law established by Congress, now is it? It's not a law of any kind, nor was the meeting etablished by the Congress of the United States. Therefore, you are incorrect, and if I may say so myself, you don't know anything about the U.S. Constitution. Actually, the Constitution is in favor of the little meeting that took place on the steps "... Congress shall make no law respecting an esablishment of religion or PROHIBITING THE FREE EXERCISE THEREOF; OR ABRIDGING THE FREEDOM... OR THE RIGHT OF THE PEOPLE PEACEABLY TO ASSEMBLE..." Pay close attention to the words in caps.
Sir, don't try to pretend like you know the Constitution frontwards and backwards just because you have watched C.N.N. a few times. Don't be fooled by other people's lies, go out and do the investigating for yourself. I have confidence in your ability, to understand and interpret the facts for yourself.

In closing, you sir, are wrong in every sense of the word, and in fact you are misleading people as to what the Constitution really says. Read it sometime, you might find that the people on C.N.N. make mistakes from time to time.


Jonathan I. King


By Rev. Ras I on Wednesday, July 14, 2004 - 12:27 am: Edit Post

Actually the Constitution isn't worth the paper it's written on, the US Patriot act is the new law of the land. Thank "President" Bush for that little bit of state sanctioned terrorism.


By @jÜÑ_Ø®Ñj on Wednesday, July 14, 2004 - 05:05 pm: Edit Post

I don't have a problem with the Patriot Act, then again, I'm not a partisan Bush-hater either. Funny how people who hate Bush seem to just automatically hate policies under his administration. Even the worst of people are right some of the time. Ummm, hello?

Secondly, I would like your explanation of how the Patriot Act is "state santioned terrorism".

@jÜÑ_Ø®Ñj


By Greg on Wednesday, July 21, 2004 - 08:59 pm: Edit Post

Hi, Jon

Actually, you might want to take another look at the Constitution-- you have to look at all the amendments, though, instead of just the first.

Technically, until the 1860's, the Bill of Rights didn't apply to state and local government. The 4th Amendment, for example, kept federal law enforcement from searching without a warrant but didn't apply to local police. The 14th Amendment (which gave black people the vote) was the first to specifically address states-- the Supreme Court has interpreted the 14th's prohibition on states abridging rights to mean that the Bill of Rights (or most of it, anyway) must apply on a state level. It's called "incorporation".

So, even though the 1st Amendment only mentions the actions of congress, it now governs the actions of all forms of American government. Hence, the city government is in violation of the Constitution by making an effort at "establishing a religion".

So, sir, don't act like you understand the Constitution forwards and backwards, just because you watch Fox News a few times.

Go out and do the investigating for yourself.


By Get over it! on Tuesday, August 10, 2004 - 10:22 pm: Edit Post

Question? Why is this always such a big deal? I could understand if they forcefully made someone stand at their gathering and accept what was being said as gospel, oops better not use that term, might offend someone. These people gathered in a peaceful fashion in order to recognize National Day of Prayer. They weren't there trying to make the government of the City of Richmond take Christianity as it's offical religion denouncing all others, they were simply there recognizing, what to them was, a special day across the country. They didn't kill anybody, let's move on, shall we. Maybe if a few more people in this country found religion, which ever one suits them mind you, maybe this country would be stronger and more united than what it is. May be those people would think twice before they committed murder, or stole something, or took the drugs from the guy on the corner. This country was founded by relgious people, and I for one think this country is a pretty dag gone good place to live, so why is it so wrong to have religon in our daily lives, which for some of us may include our politics? To be completely honest somebody should contact PETA, because this horse has been beat to death too many times.


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